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Old 01-29-2015, 12:55 PM   #1
Harnett_M
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Smile Hello just began my education into Linux


Hello everyone I'm Harnett_M and I've just started a new course at my school about Linux.So far we've only learned about who created the original Linux kernel, but I'm eager to learn all I can and am appreciative of any help your willing to offer.
 
Old 01-29-2015, 12:57 PM   #2
peterhen
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hi nice to meet you

linux was first developed by Linus tarvolds in the 1990s
 
Old 01-29-2015, 01:19 PM   #3
Harnett_M
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Thank you for responding

Thanks for the info I saw that the distribution you're using is Ubuntu. How do you like it?
 
Old 01-29-2015, 01:23 PM   #4
peterhen
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This isn't the latest version but runs pretty smoothly but I would recommend the mint Distribution
 
Old 01-29-2015, 01:32 PM   #5
Fred-1.2.13
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Tons of stuff out there on Linux. Just start searching for things that come up in your class that prompts more questions. What distribution are you using in class? That is where I would start, then read the forum for that distro, you will be surprised what you pick up! Welcome to the wonderful world of Linux!
 
Old 01-29-2015, 01:42 PM   #6
Harnett_M
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Question Thanks

Thank you for the Welcome.
Our Professor says that he will briefly explain the different distributions, with the exception of Fedora, however the class is only 4 weeks long and combined with learning Mac as well. Personally I don't feel like it's nearly enough time to adequately learn it, but I'm going to try my best What distribution would you recommend as a good starting point to someone that's only used Windows prior.
 
Old 01-29-2015, 09:36 PM   #7
frankbell
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Here are some resources you might find useful:

Going Linuxis a podcast with many other available resources.

About dot com has a good Linux site oriented to new and intermediate users.

Linux Voice is a new Linux magazine that posts useful articles. Magazine issues are made available under a Creative Commons license nine months after publication dates.

Welcome to the wonderful world of Linux and Open Source.
 
Old 01-30-2015, 09:52 AM   #8
TxLonghorn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harnett_M View Post
What distribution would you recommend as a good starting point to someone that's only used Windows prior.
Linux Mint and Ubuntu are great first distributions.
Please be aware that these linux distributions (distros) have expiration dates. You should pick a version which is still supported. The latest Mint version is 17.1 and is supported (with security updates, etc) until April, 2019. The latest Ubuntu version is 14.10 and is supported until July, 2015. The latest LTS (Long Term Support) version of Ubuntu is 14.04.1, supported until April, 2019. Some other common distros recommended for beginners are PCLinuxOS and Zorin. I really like Korora (based on Fedora) with the Cinnamon desktop.
The nice thing is that when the support ends, the upgrade to a new supported version is free and easy - much easier than installing Windows, I hear. (I wouldn't know firsthand.)
 
Old 01-30-2015, 09:57 AM   #9
fatmac
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Welcome aboard. Take a look here to get an idea of what is available to you distro wise.
http://distrowatch.com/
 
Old 01-30-2015, 11:05 AM   #10
Fred-1.2.13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harnett_M View Post
Thank you for the Welcome.
Our Professor says that he will briefly explain the different distributions, with the exception of Fedora, however the class is only 4 weeks long and combined with learning Mac as well. Personally I don't feel like it's nearly enough time to adequately learn it, but I'm going to try my best What distribution would you recommend as a good starting point to someone that's only used Windows prior.
I'm a Slackware guy, but the Linux Mint suggestion is a good one to start with. http://www.linuxmint.com/

Go with the default Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" - Cinnamon release http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

You want the first one in the list: Cinnamon 32-bit 64-bit An edition featuring the Cinnamon desktop

Stick with it and you will learn a lot! It helps if you have a spare machine to play with that way you don't have to mess with dual booting and you can focus on Linux.

Last edited by Fred-1.2.13; 01-30-2015 at 11:06 AM.
 
Old 01-30-2015, 12:01 PM   #11
Harnett_M
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Wow Thank you guys so much for all the info and links. I'm sharing them with my class right now and I can tell you that we really appreciate it.

I'll admit I wasn't expecting as much of a response as I'd gotten. It's my first try with the forums and I wasn't sure what to expect, but I'm really glad with how nice and informative everyone seems to be.

Thanks again
 
Old 01-30-2015, 12:55 PM   #12
InterceptorF
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Thumbs up Welcome to the fray.

Welcome to Linux. I suggest you learn to code with it. Since it is written in C, try to learn that as well as C++ and also some JAVA. You don't have to be a super code monger but you should at least learn how to do some "hello world"'s and math code... the easy stuff just so you understand the compilers, libraries and the API's. I use Ubuntu server 14.04 currently but have used Redhat and SUSE in the past. Really makes no difference but there subtle differences - Debian can be a steep curve to learn off the bat but once you get past the freakiness of its sudo and some other quirks, its a solid nice distro. Ubuntu is very well documented and is a debian version. I like that when you try to run something and it can't it will tell you what program needs to be installed and the syntax for the apt-get to get that program installed and working so you aren't getting flustered trying to make things run and fall into a rabbit hole... Desktop Ubuntu is fairly easy to start learning because there's a GUI for the web and such but you will need to start learning cli commands and directory/file system stuff to learn to get around. Look at the books & reviews here and in the LQ forums, ask questions and pick something that fits your study style. Know how to use gzip, gunzip, ifconfig, useradd, ping and those type of commands. Look in /proc and cat the flat files there to see what they are showing. Find the /var/log directory and cat the log files so you can see what the system can tell you. Learn Apache web server and how to modify the the .conf for it.There also mySQL, PHP, and a slew of programs you can learn once you get comfy with the basic's. Enjoy.
 
Old 01-30-2015, 09:08 PM   #13
fenario
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GNOME Flashback

Hi Harnet

Welcome to this forum. I would also recommend Ubuntu 14.04 as it is a long term support version. best to install the flashback desktop variant; easier to tweak. That is on the Ubuntu Gnome DVD. First thing to install is the synaptic package manager with the terminal command: sudo apt-get install synaptic. It's a great app to find, install and update software; better than the software center (dumbed down version). Once you open synaptic navigate down to gnome-session-fallback, right click, choose mark for installation. It will compute what other dependancies you need and download them as well to be installed. Once installed you log out and, if available, at the login screen you can choose GNOME Flashback (Compiz). Also requires "compiz" to be installed. Good fun.
 
Old 02-03-2015, 02:56 AM   #14
bert07
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Hi,

I just uploaded "UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook (4th Edition) 2010" to my website. This might be very helpful.

http://www.beebab.be/que/Linux.pdf

Good luck!
 
Old 02-03-2015, 03:02 PM   #15
nemestrinus
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Welcome. Yes, Linux is wonderful.
So many different distro's out there! I started with Slackware in the mid 1990's, it seemed pretty difficult to learn stuff but I had lots of helps via forums like these. Many other distro's have come and gone but Slackware has remained, true to its original mission, and longer than any other. Although I have tried several others I always come back. It is true that others such as Ubuntu and Mint Linux are quite popular and may be easier if you are just starting out. Even Slackware is much "easier" than it used to be.
 
  


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