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Old 11-10-2001, 09:43 PM   #16
TheGrinch
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Quote:
Originally posted by 9nine9


So in Windows Explorer, a Linux partition is hidden?

What does "dev" stand for in your example? And in my case, if I put Linux on a partition after F:, where would Linux appear on the tree?

Sorry if these sound like dumb questions but I had a real hard time with "directories" in the first place when I first started out with Windows. When they changed the name to "folders", it made more sense to me. I can understand folders within folders within folders, but I have some kind of a mental block with "directories".
Let's first of all start with one thing. There are no stupid questions, just stupid answers We all have to start somewhere.

The /dev dir is basically a storage bin for all your devices. A harddisk is a device, so linux drops it in there.

You should try to see Linux and Windows as two seperate things. Windows will not even know Linux excists. Linux won't know about Windows, unless you tell it it's there.

The way Windows partitions drives is with C:, D:, etc. (This is only for the partitions it will recognize, i.e. windows partitions).

Linux sees it differently, it is all one big directory, with files. Everything is a file (or directory)

If you partitioned as follows:
40 GB drive
10 GB Windows C:
10 GB Windows D:
20 GB Linux

Your HD is very likely the first drive on the first controller, making it hda in linux.

Say you would like to mount (use) your windows C: in linux as /win_c

you would type

mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /win_c

In this command you are telling linux to mount a vfat partition (windows) which is on device hda as the first partition (/dev/hda1) Furthermore, you would like to access it as /win_c.

EDIT: for the D: drive, the second partition:
mount -t vfat /dev/hda2 /win_d

to make linux "forget" where it is again. (That is, you're done with the drive).

umount /win_c (Notice, it's not uNmount, but umount.)

I am sure if I fubarred on this, someone will correct me

TheGrinch

Last edited by TheGrinch; 11-10-2001 at 09:54 PM.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 09:46 PM   #17
TheGrinch
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Re: Re: Re: Re: M$ or linux partioning

Quote:
Originally posted by 9nine9


Thanks. I think I'm starting to see some light at the end of the tunnel. So I take it that diskdruid "sees" the Windows partitions during the Linux install? Does Mandrake have a similar utility?
Diskdruid does indeed see your windows partitions. I am not sure about Mandrake, but from what I read they have a nice utility for it too, so I assume it should be ok.

TheGrinch.

PS: I forgot to say this in my last message, Redhat will automagically mount those windows partitions for you when you boot linux, again, not sure if Mandrake will do that for you.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 10:03 PM   #18
9nine9
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Thumbs up Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: M$ or linux partioning

Quote:
Originally posted by TheGrinch

Redhat will automagically mount those windows partitions for you when you boot linux, again, not sure if Mandrake will do that for you.
Thanks alot for your help, Grinch.

Are there any Mandrakers around here who know the answer to that question? I don't think I wanna do the mount process every time I boot into Linux. Too much room for error. :smash:
 
Old 11-11-2001, 05:01 AM   #19
acid_kewpie
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automaounting vfat partitions is a very basic thing, every distro can do it. the partitions just need to be setup properly in /etc/fstab. Things like that aren't developed as a 'nice touch' but taken for granted from the start pretty much. Mandrake does come with supermount aswell, which i don't really like, but it lets you use cd drives the same way as windows, ie open and close them without remounting, and does a better job than windows does too, but i don't like it.
 
Old 11-11-2001, 03:22 PM   #20
taz.devil
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Yea, you are pretty mu correct that the Linux partitions are hidden from windows, although, you can download special utilities to view them in a DOS mode command prompt or in Internet Explorer. In my case, so I could see the Linux tree from windows, I downloads LTools and when you run the LTools server you would then open IE 5/6 or what have you and as the address (which is in the readme of the download) type http://localhost and you can view everything that way. It's handy but you really can't write to it, some tools let you but it's still dangerous. /dev is just the directory where all of your devices such as mouse, hda1,2,3 etc. are found. With Partition magic, you need to make a root (designated by '/') directory/partition and a /swap maybe 100-200MB. Use two of your exrta part's to do that and install linux on them. The mounting is fairly simple. In linux you have a device and a mount point. An example would be /dev/hda1 /c-drive or whatever you want to name it. That's how the /etc/fstab works. So the actual device, which is the partitioned of windows is hda1 (for example) and the point you wish to mount it in the Linux tree is /c-drive. Hope I haven't conflustered you more. Hope it explains things some more. Have a good one.
 
Old 11-11-2001, 03:24 PM   #21
taz.devil
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Sorry, somehow I jumped threads and posted here....D'oh!
 
Old 11-11-2001, 09:57 PM   #22
9nine9
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Quote:
Originally posted by taz.devil
Hope I haven't conflustered you more. Hope it explains things some more. Have a good one.
LOL! I'm gonna have to sleep on all this stuff for a few nights and let it work it's way through my brain. Thanks for the help.
 
Old 11-13-2001, 11:21 AM   #23
Thymox
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Don't worry. The concept of mounting, mountpoints, filesystems, etc, is normally one of the hardest things for recent converts to get to grips with. Here's a not-quite-so-short intro:

Basically, Microsoft (in all their wisdom) have decided to put on the blinkers and refuse to even acknowledge that other OSs exist. Windows will only 'see' partitions that are formatted as FAT (either Fat16 or Fat32, more commonly referred to as VFAT in the Linux world). Linux uses a different type of file-system, called ext2 (or ext3, but this is still fairly new). Luckily for us, the nice people who develop stuff for Linux have allowed us the freedom to not only see, but also to write to various different file-systems (including VFAT).

Now, onto 'mount-points':

Have you ever noticed that if you add a second harddisk to windows (this is presuming that it has one partition, and that is VFAT formatted) it will assume that it is D:. What if you have lots of links on your desktop to programs that resided on your old D: (second Win partition on the 1st HDD, or on a CD?)?. The links will still point to files on D:, but now D: is a different thing completely. Annoying?

Linux (and most other Unix based OSs) use hierachical (spelling?) directory structures. That is, it acts like a true tree with only one root (/) and many brances (the subdir coming off from /). The /dev directory represents the hardware in your computer. Therefore, if you have only 1 harddisk, but 5 partitions on it, you will see the files:
/dev/hda
/dev/hda1
/dev/hda5
/dev/hda6
/dev/hda7
/dev/hda8
. You will probably also see /dev/hdb as this is might be your CD drive.

Now, these partitions have filesystesm (presuming that they're already formatted). You don't mount a partition, but you mount the filesystem. So, if Windows resides on /dev/hda1 (which is likely) then you would first make a directory onto which you would mount the filesystem. mkdir /mnt/win_c. Then you would do the actual mounting. mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c. Then, when you move into the directory /mnt/win_c you should see all the files that you would normally associate with your C drive.

Now, I personally find that this works better for me:

/mnt/win/c = C:
/mnt/win/d = D:
/mnt/win/e = E:

You can still mount these, but rather than:
mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c
you would use:
mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /mnt/win/c.
 
Old 11-16-2001, 05:35 PM   #24
9nine9
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Quote:
Originally posted by Thymox
Therefore, if you have only 1 harddisk, but 5 partitions on it, you will see the files:
/dev/hda
/dev/hda1
/dev/hda5
/dev/hda6
/dev/hda7
/dev/hda8
. You will probably also see /dev/hdb as this is might be your CD drive.
Thanks. This clears some things up for me. But why is it hda1, 5, 6, 7 and 8?

Here's what I have - C:, D:, E:, and F: and then I have R: (CDRom) and W: (CD Writer). So how would Linux see these?

(I designated my CDRom and CDR(Writer) as R: and W: so I could make more partitions if I wanted to without having to worry about changing the drive letters for the two CD drives.)

Thanks again.
 
Old 11-16-2001, 05:50 PM   #25
acid_kewpie
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cd drives appear the same as hard drives, assuming its IDE, it'll just be hdX, but no partition number, as you mount the entire device...

the numbers.. right i guess it's cos a disk can have 4 primary partitions and then howeever many etended ones... so hda[1-4] are from primaries only, 5+ if for the otehrs. yeah?

if you want to write cdr then you'll need to learn about scsi emulation.. but that's anotehr issue...

and how you chose your windows drive letters is up to you.. nothing to do with linux!
 
  


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