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Old 11-07-2001, 08:13 PM   #1
Eskimo
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hard drive partioning


Good evening to all. This is my first posting.
I have a dell inspiron 7500 with 20 gig hd.
Here is my current partiontion map:
c:windoz :
fat 32 3079 mb
extended: 15231 mb which is divided into below:
fat 32 4097.4 mb logical
fat 32 4097.4 mb logical
linux ext2 2052.4 mb logical (want to change to fat32)
linux ext2 2052.4 mb logical
fat 32 2820.2 mb logical (changed from linux ext2)
linux swap 110.7 mb logical
linux ext2 738.3 mb primary
unallocated 29.5 mb primary


I think I missed the first 1024 cylinders, so I was never able to use lilo to boot for the redhat 6, installed on the sytem.
I now need more space for windoz files and will be reinstalling all software after repartioning my hd. i will be purchasing a new version of linux as well.
I need 15 gig of hd for windoz and the rest allocated for linux (this sounds bad)
how should I partition my hard drive so I can dual boot? does it have to be on the first 1024 cylinders of new versions of linux? (which is recommended for newbies seeking easy setups & use)
I have partion magic 6 with boot magic, can this be used to boot to linux?
Any assitance is greatly appreciated.

stumped Eskimo...
 
Old 11-07-2001, 09:06 PM   #2
taz.devil
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Yer in luck, the new versions of LILO boot past the 1024th cylinder. I dual boot my win98/slack machine just fine with a normal windows install and then a plain ol linux install, no special partitioning. The file lilo uses is lilo.conf as you probably know, and the first line in it is 'lba32' minus the quotes, which allows the 1024th cylinder problem, a non-problem. So you have alot more room to work with knowing that. Have a good one....
 
Old 11-08-2001, 03:11 AM   #3
acid_kewpie
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well... i guess that's pretty much what i'd say. new distros (rh72, md80, md81 ss73) no longer have the 1024cyl prob... anythign else inparticular you need to know? i'd personally recommend md81, as the partitioning tools on ther are superb.
 
Old 11-08-2001, 09:57 AM   #4
w0rmh0l3
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I've heard though that Partition Magic 7 is generally more reliable (not sure about 6) than DiskDrake. You're pretty safe either way I'm guessing if you defragment and checkdisk your partitions first.
 
Old 11-09-2001, 10:15 PM   #5
9nine9
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After reading several posts here, I'm still not clear on something. If I put let's say Mandrake on another partition (G:\), will it be able to read and write from/to C:, D:, E:, and F:? I have Win98 on drive C:

Also, what's the modem situation? Do I need two modems before I can get online with Linux? I've got a U.S.Robotics modem now but I heard Linux won't work with that.

 
Old 11-10-2001, 03:34 AM   #6
acid_kewpie
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you probably know this already, but to make it clear, you can't install linux on G:, it doesn't make sense, as X: is a M$ convention, and totally separate to linux and other os's.

But yes, linux can read and write to fat32 drives.

as for modems, you need one listed at linmodems.org. it's all because many manufactors are bastards and won't release the driver spec or their hardware, or write a linux driver. But you don't need two. you just need on linux compatible one!
 
Old 11-10-2001, 01:34 PM   #7
9nine9
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Quote:
Originally posted by acid_kewpie
you probably know this already, but to make it clear, you can't install linux on G:, it doesn't make sense, as X: is a M$ convention, and totally separate to linux and other os's.

But yes, linux can read and write to fat32 drives.
No, I didn't know. And now I'm completely confused. I thought you could install Linux into a separate partition. Each partition gets assigned a drive letter so why can't you put Linux where ever you want to? I have a 40 GB drive. I now have 4 partitions but have room for more.

 
Old 11-10-2001, 06:23 PM   #8
taz.devil
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He says that because Windows uses FAT as it's file system method. Linux needs to have an ext2 or newer even ext3 file system partitioned space and since linux doesn't use MS filesystem type, you won't have a D: E: F: etc. Linux actually uses a more logical method by calling your harddrive (say you have only one) hda your cdrom may be hdb and floppy fp0 etc. and from hda being the disk, linux uses hda1, 2 ,3 etc. to define the partitions. So basically if you have free space, it needs to be converted to ext2/3fs before you can intall on it.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 06:31 PM   #9
TheGrinch
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M$ or linux partioning

The difference is in how M$ assigns each partion a letter. So you have A: Floppy B: Floppy C: HD D: CDROM etc.

In linux you don't get letters for each drive, but a mount point.

It all starts at / (the root of the directory structure)

Basically, you could mount a partition as /home, or /usr, or /home/mydir. The partitions form a seemless tree.

Say something like this

/ -> 500 MB partition
/home -> 5 GB partition.
/home/you -> 5 GB partition.

That way a file being put in /usr would be stored in the / partition. A file for /home/usera would go on the /home partition.
And a file for /home/you/movies would go to /home/you.

For instance, you could mount your windows C drive in linux as /windows_c, that way you would have access to your windows files in linux, or be able to save files from linux in a spot where windows can "see" them.

It's a great concept. No more C: or D:, it all becomes one big tree.

TheGrinch.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:05 PM   #10
9nine9
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Quote:
Originally posted by taz.devil
Linux actually uses a more logical method by calling your harddrive (say you have only one) hda your cdrom may be hdb and floppy fp0 etc. and from hda being the disk, linux uses hda1, 2 ,3 etc. to define the partitions. So basically if you have free space, it needs to be converted to ext2/3fs before you can intall on it.
Ah ha! So how does Windows treat this new space? I have PartitionMagic, which is what I used in the first place to make the 4 partitions that I have. If I make another partition for Linux from some of my free space, does Windows see that as another partition or is it hidden from Windows? I guess this is another way of asking what I asked you in another post. I'm still having a hard time grasping this "mount" concept. Thanks for the help.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:09 PM   #11
TheGrinch
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Quote:
Originally posted by 9nine9


Ah ha! So how does Windows treat this new space? I have PartitionMagic, which is what I used in the first place to make the 4 partitions that I have. If I make another partition for Linux from some of my free space, does Windows see that as another partition or is it hidden from Windows? I guess this is another way of asking what I asked you in another post. I'm still having a hard time grasping this "mount" concept. Thanks for the help.
As far as I know Windows doesn't recognize the linux partitions. Linux is more user-friendly, as it will recognize windows partitions. (That is, if you tell it nicely where they are located, like /dev/hda1 for instance).

TheGrinch
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:16 PM   #12
9nine9
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Re: M$ or linux partioning

Quote:
Originally posted by TheGrinch
For instance, you could mount your windows C drive in linux as /windows_c, that way you would have access to your windows files in linux, or be able to save files from linux in a spot where windows can "see" them.

It's a great concept. No more C: or D:, it all becomes one big tree.

TheGrinch.
I have C:, D:, E: and F:

How would the tree look in Linux if I wanted to have access to all of them? Thanks.
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:25 PM   #13
TheGrinch
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Re: Re: M$ or linux partioning

Quote:
Originally posted by 9nine9


I have C:, D:, E: and F:

How would the tree look in Linux if I wanted to have access to all of them? Thanks.
The thing about linux is, you can make that look the way you want.

You could make it:
/win_c, /win_d, /win_e, /win_f

or if you are into the beatles

/john, /ringo, /paul, /george

It really comes down to how you like it.

The way I did it, was to give the windows drives a linux mountpoint in diskdruid (a utility which is used by Redhat during installation) So when you install linux, you can already decide on the names, /windows_c is just as good as /win_c or anything that works well for you.

Hope this helps,
TheGrinch
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:31 PM   #14
9nine9
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Quote:
Originally posted by TheGrinch


As far as I know Windows doesn't recognize the linux partitions. Linux is more user-friendly, as it will recognize windows partitions. (That is, if you tell it nicely where they are located, like /dev/hda1 for instance).

TheGrinch
So in Windows Explorer, a Linux partition is hidden?

What does "dev" stand for in your example? And in my case, if I put Linux on a partition after F:, where would Linux appear on the tree?

Sorry if these sound like dumb questions but I had a real hard time with "directories" in the first place when I first started out with Windows. When they changed the name to "folders", it made more sense to me. I can understand folders within folders within folders, but I have some kind of a mental block with "directories".
 
Old 11-10-2001, 08:37 PM   #15
9nine9
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Re: Re: Re: M$ or linux partioning

Quote:
Originally posted by TheGrinch


The way I did it, was to give the windows drives a linux mountpoint in diskdruid (a utility which is used by Redhat during installation) So when you install linux, you can already decide on the names, /windows_c is just as good as /win_c or anything that works well for you.

Hope this helps,
TheGrinch
Thanks. I think I'm starting to see some light at the end of the tunnel. So I take it that diskdruid "sees" the Windows partitions during the Linux install? Does Mandrake have a similar utility?
 
  


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