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Old 09-21-2008, 05:13 PM   #31
mhg
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Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Utah
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OK! I am good.

So, the proper procedure would be:
1. Make a directory where I want to mount the new hard drive.
2. Mount the hard drive to that directory.

Without using fstab, after creating the directory, I should be able to use the command "mount /dev/sdb5/home/mike/(directory name)". Is this correct?

Now to commit this to memory!

Thank you very much for your time and effort. I will now copy files, and get to setting up other things.

It is a neat idea,that the directory is actually the drive.
 
Old 09-21-2008, 05:18 PM   #32
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhg View Post
Without using fstab, after creating the directory, I should be able to use the command "mount /dev/sdb5/home/mike/(directory name)".
You need a space between the device and the mount point. You may also want to read the mount man page ("man mount") for more information about mount.
 
Old 09-21-2008, 05:26 PM   #33
mhg
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Well this is not even fun anymore.

I attach my external drive, go to copy a folder to my new directory, and I get the message that I don't have permission. The folders all have a locked icon on them.

IF I have fstab set to rw, why can I not write to it?

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
# /dev/sda6
UUID=1a123196-9a11-42fc-9cec-90e3f8a8945e / ext3 relatime,errors=remount-ro 0 1
# /dev/sda7
UUID=9b419357-bdb8-4f6f-9300-685b61dabc7e none swap sw 0 0
/dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0
/dev/sdb5 /home/mike/backup ext3 auto,rw 1 2

Thank You
 
Old 09-21-2008, 05:28 PM   #34
Robhogg
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Have a look at this debian forum thread.

It has been confusing me, but apparently (with ext2/ext3 partitions), the ownership of the mounted filesystem is determined by the owner of the root of the partition being mounted, so (once the new partition is mounted), set the ownership of the mountpoint as appropriate, i.e.:

Code:
sudo chown <username>:<group> <mountpoint>
By changing the ownership of the mountpoint (/home/rob/Shared) after mounting the partition, I managed to write to the the root partition of an old installation as an unprivileged user. This should only need to be done once.

Edited to add:
Just verified that - I unmounted the partition, set the ownership of the mountpoint to root:root, then remounted, and ls -ld /home/rob/Shared showed the mountpoint to be owned by rob:rob (and I could write to it again).

Quote:
Well this is not even fun anymore.
Aah, the frustration of struggling with an obstinate computer system. Just think how good it will feel in the morning, though.

Good fortune,
Rob.

Last edited by Robhogg; 09-21-2008 at 05:49 PM.
 
Old 09-21-2008, 05:59 PM   #35
mhg
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I did some linux-google searches, and ended up with this:

mike@mike-desktop:~$ sudo chown -R mike /home/mike/backup
[sudo] password for mike:
mike@mike-desktop:~$

It did unlock those folders.

NOW, I really am good to go.

Thanks. One thing I can say about Linux, there always seems to be someone around willing to help out (very unlike XP)
 
  


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