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Old 09-07-2006, 05:36 PM   #1
Dark X PSX
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Registered: Jun 2004
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GRUB Prob and some newbie questions


I just installed SUSE 10.1 yesterday with no problems. But one has accured.

When I try to boot Windows with Grub, I get this message:

chainloader (hd1,0)+1

So I restarted, logged in as root, and changed the hd1 to sda1 (Which is what it should be...)

Here is what the menu.1st has in it for Windows:

title Windows XP Pro
chainloader (sda1,0)+1

When I tried booting XP again, I got this message:

chainloader (sda1,0)+1
Error 23: Error while parsing number

Here is the HDD info for the hard drive that XP is on:

Disk /dev/sda: 164.6 GB, 164696555520 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 20023 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 20022 160826683+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

GRUB is on my other HDD with SUSE:

Disk /dev/hdd: 123.5 GB, 123522416640 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 15017 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hdd1 1 262 2104483+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/hdd2 * 263 2873 20972857+ 83 Linux
/dev/hdd3 2874 15017 97546680 83 Linux

Does anyone have any clues as to how I can get XP to boot?

I've tried searching, but I've just gotten confused by what I found.

I was able to figure out how to mount my NTFS partition though lol.

questions ^_^

1. How do I get Numb Lock to start on boot?
2. How do I set my user as a root user so I don't have to log in as root to edit certain files?

I was thinking about posting this in General, but I really wasn't sure if it belonged there.

Thanks in advance!
 
Old 09-07-2006, 05:57 PM   #2
homey
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Registered: Oct 2003
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Quote:
So I restarted, logged in as root, and changed the hd1 to sda1 (Which is what it should be...)
nope!
In grub speak, that should still be hd something

Normally, it would look like this...
Code:
title Windows
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
But since you are doing a mix and match of sd and hd drives, you may need something like this...
Code:
title Windows
rootnoverify (hd1,0)
map (hd0) (hd1)
map (hd1) (hd0)
chainloader +1
 
Old 09-07-2006, 07:29 PM   #3
Dark X PSX
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Thanks dude, it worked ^_^.

If you were here right now, I would kiss you XD.
 
Old 09-07-2006, 08:02 PM   #4
homey
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I'd pass on that at any rate!
 
Old 09-07-2006, 09:25 PM   #5
JimBass
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As to your root question, the answer is simple, don't do it!

Doing that would destroy the beautiful and highly effective permissions system within linux. It would degrade the security of your system to a level no higher than what you find in windows. Coming fresh from win, I remeber being upset that I couldn't run all over the OS, editing every file I wanted. You'll soon outgrow that.

When you as a user have unlimited power over the system, anything you do or spawn from something you do will also have unlimited power. That is how things like spyware have so much effect in win world. With you running as/with administrator (root) rights, everything can be effected. Under the linux system, you the user don't have the write to edit files in the /etc directory for example, so even if you ran or were tricked into running a malware type script, it won't be able to do anything besides screw up your personal files, but it can't touch the much more important system files.

That is also why you'll see running as full time root is very highly discouraged by most of the senior members here.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 09-08-2006, 05:45 PM   #6
Dark X PSX
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I don't even get spy/adware in Windows, haven't had anything in over a year. I watch what I install heh.

I understand what you're saying, but, it's annoying when I have to edit a file that Linux won't let me edit unless I'm signed in as root. I just wanna be able to edit the files when I need to, so is there a way that I can give my user temp root? I remember with Fedora Core, I could sign in with my username and when I wanted to edit something, I could give my user temp root, all I had to do was enter the password somewhere, and when I was done, close the root thingie (I think that's how it worked, can't remember, it's been a long time lol).

I know when I want to install a program, it asked for the root password, I enter it and let Linux install it. But it never ask me for the password when I want to open some text files, like the menu.1st file. That's what really annoys me.
 
Old 09-08-2006, 06:48 PM   #7
JimBass
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That is entirely different. The program you are thinking of is called sudo. It allows you to give your user pasword (depending on how you configure it), and that gives you root permissions just for that command. You can install sudo on every distro, then config it. That will accomplish what you are looking for.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 09-08-2006, 06:49 PM   #8
homey
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You may be thinking of sudo
or you can run a command as root like this...
Code:
su - -c "ntpdate ntp.nasa.gov ; hwclock --systohc"
You will need the root user password.
 
Old 09-08-2006, 11:31 PM   #9
AwesomeMachine
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That's scary that you actually believe that.
 
Old 09-09-2006, 12:49 AM   #10
masonm
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You don't log in as root or with root permissions. If you're going to do that you may as well just run a default windows installation.
 
  


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