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Old 10-18-2006, 09:08 AM   #1
flamingvan
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Group permissions


I have 2 servers here. On one of them people that are in the right group can write to files of permission level 755 even if they are not the owner. This seems wrong to me because according to the permission level only the owner should be able to write.

I need to make the second server like the first. Is it possible?

These are web accessible files. Would it be better to make all the files 775? If so, I know I could use umask to do this but I am on solaris and I cannot find a .bashrc file to add it to. There are some files named 'local.login' but adding umask 020 or 0020 does not seem to work. I am testing the results by logging into the server through ftp and creating a directory.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Moses
 
Old 10-18-2006, 09:56 AM   #2
jstephens84
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I believe by using something called suid you can make it where your permissions would be something like 1755 which would say anyone that does something to this file has permissions equal to owner.
 
Old 10-18-2006, 09:57 AM   #3
jstephens84
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This is a good refresher on permissions. http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/linux/..._ugfilesp.html
 
Old 10-18-2006, 10:36 AM   #4
flamingvan
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Success!

Many thanks! I read the tutorial and the chmod g+s spcprjdir command did the trick.
 
Old 10-18-2006, 11:11 AM   #5
jstephens84
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One thing to note about suid is that it can lead to a security issue. say you did a suid on a config file. You could be opening yourself up for a hacker to breach your system. Just be careful about what you use for suid.
 
  


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