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Old 06-23-2005, 09:31 AM   #16
craigevil
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Quote:
Originally posted by Granden
craigevil, I dont think debian is that hard as gentoo, gentoo need a lot more of reading to get it work, much compiling etc. Debian is a great os for the person that wanna learn linux and not compile everything. The most you ever would like you can use the apt-system for in debian. Gentoo have a similair system I think. But just the installation of the debian is very easy compared to gentoo in my oppinion.

Never tried gentoo the idea of compiling all my apps just doesn't sound like fun. I am relatively new to Linux. I only installed Debian in November 2004. The lack of GUIs for all the config settings was kinda confusing at first, then I realized all it takes is knowing which text file to edit. Icewm is a great desktop, the config files are very simple.

Apt is awesome, it makes installing apps simple.


My advice is pick the distro based on what you want and need. If you really want to learn how Linux works then Debian, Slackware or Gentoo are the way to go.

If you just want a distro that "Just Works" and that has GUI for everything then get Ubuntu, MEPIS, or PCLinuxOS. You can still learn how Linux works it just takes a little digging.
 
Old 06-23-2005, 09:50 AM   #17
zord
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@Dark_Sniper*:
> as long as i can get internet on linux then it would be alot easier so i can look up doc's. And download stuff. And also read up thing that would help me to learn Linux.

If you have a dhcp server/router it is really easy.
In Slackware it would work like this: At the beginning you run the command 'network' to detect you're ethernet card. During the installation, you're asked to configure you're network. Just choose the option to use dhcp, and you're online.
If you use dsl without a router, it's also no problem. use the script 'adsl-setup', it asks a few questions about you're provider, it's nameserver and so on.
afterwards you can use 'adsl-start' and 'adsl-stop' to connect/disconnect.

Isdn can get a little bit tricky, I have no experience with that, but I'm sure someone else here could help you with that.


> And Suse i couldnt even Mount that thing when i tried it was hard
Which thing?
 
Old 06-23-2005, 10:21 AM   #18
slackist
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You are on a summer break and want to take a dip into the Linux pond, correct?

If that is the case I'd suggest Knoppix if your machine has the capability to boot from a CD.

With Knoppix you will get a live CD, so no install worries and awesome hardware detection so chances are your network, printer, digital camera etc will work off the bat or very easily.

knoppix will give you a good taste of what Linux can do without making you read too much first and taking up the summer break time

If you are happy to spend the summer digging a little deeper and learning Linux from the ground up then slap in a Slackware install disk and have at it!

Good luck and have a happy summer
 
Old 06-23-2005, 06:14 PM   #19
Dark_Sniper*
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yea but the router part i'm runing cable modem to a router which goes to my mac airport and my linksys wireless pci card. And yes i what to learn something new this summer. And linux is what i want to learn. But the internet part to me is hard. becuase i dont know half the stuff you guys are talking about doing.
 
Old 06-23-2005, 06:57 PM   #20
Electro
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I suggest buying a wired PCI network card (aka NIC). A wired NIC is the easiest to use and setup in Linux. Wireless PCI NIC are for lazy people that do not want to wire a room. Wireless networking is very, very, very risky. For novice user, it can be very dangerous if you do not use wep or wap, VPN (virtual private network), and setting up only MAC address access. I do not suggest buying patch or RJ-45 cable at the computer store because it is very costly. Making your the patch cable by yourself is easy and much cheaper. Setting up Linux to access the internet is much easier than you think. You just need to setup to use dhcpd to set an IP address and set the gateway address.

Gentoo is much easier than people think when getting programs. It uses a python program called emerge. It uses a file called an ebuild that tells how to install the program and what it requires. After it finds the required programs, it will then install it for you. The Gentoo documentation is very thorough.

Again, I strongly suggest staying away from SUSE because installing nVidia graphics software has problems.
 
Old 06-23-2005, 07:00 PM   #21
Dark_Sniper*
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yea i hace a cat5 calbe and i do have a wire card thats whats connected to it. I have the computer with linux wired. the wire running from room to room. But how do i set up my router or computer so that i can set it up in linux as you say.
 
Old 06-24-2005, 01:43 AM   #22
speel
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pclinuxos enough said
 
Old 06-24-2005, 01:56 AM   #23
Dark_Sniper*
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thats not enogh said taht means nothing to me. I dont know that much im trying to learn this stuff.
 
Old 06-28-2005, 09:49 PM   #24
Dark_Sniper*
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ok well i still dont know what to put in teh 2nd hdd that uses LILO as a bootloader so i can dual boot between the hdd's. I was thinkin Gentoo but which one " minimal" "Universal" or mandrake Offiacl 10.1 or SUSE 9.1 i dont know r something esle help i wwant to learn soon.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 03:05 AM   #25
Nz_Boy_2004
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Gentoo, the install alone is really good way to learn linux i learnt quite alot from the install its self but i would of screamed if i didnt have my experence from Slackware , My reccomendation is Download Slackware learn all teh basics etc then move onto Gentoo, or if you read the documentation of Gentoo and prnt it off etc you could survive the instal without thinking of suicide much , Do you rekon gentoo will ever include a menu or gui install i hope not its all apart of its charm :P.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 03:07 AM   #26
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O and for the install use the universial dont even attempt a stage 1.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 10:19 AM   #27
Dark_Sniper*
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well see my other choose was ubuntu but when i tried to install it would do everything when installion is happen it came up with this error say can not compltete process becasue of network or bad cd burn i know my cd is good. So i dont know what esle to try and as far as Slackware goes i dont really want to go into it that much. ANd if you say gentoo is goin to be a pain to install then i will wait when i know a little more. But for know i dont know what i want to put on the 2nd hdd.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 12:13 PM   #28
Eagle_Seven
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I wouldn't give up on SuSe just yet, despite what these people say........

Yes, Yast tends to make the initial install smooth and easy. However, the way you learn with Suse is through problems. In my experience with Suse, Yast was very poor at fixing problems, and so I had to fix them manually. However, since it still installed ok at first, I could get online for help, when needed, while I was working with the CLI. For example, you're having problems mounting.......I had problems with GRUB and LILO = couldn't boot the system for a week. But if you can get it, its not bad to try out and get your feet wet in.

It sounds though, you should go with an Ubuntu Live CD or Install disk. You can order them here:http://shipit.ubuntulinux.org/

SuSe, Mandrake, Ubuntu = Wading Pool, with extension --> slow paced

Gentoo, Slackware = Thrown off the boat in the middle of the Atlantic

free of charge. That should get you going with a basic setup, and also GNOME so you won't be stranded in a Black and White CLI desert, like slackware, forced to learn or die, lol.

Last edited by Eagle_Seven; 06-29-2005 at 12:18 PM.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 12:32 PM   #29
Dark_Sniper*
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i have ubuntu live and install they work fine i dont know y its not workin but ill find a way. So what your sayin is SuSe mit be a good one to learn with question i want to use a bootloader so i have a menu so i can pick which on ei want will SuSe let me do this or no. And Mandrake i have it 10.1 so this one too is a good one to learn with. But as i said i want to be able to have that menu if i can i will upload SuSe if not Mandrake 10.1.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 12:42 PM   #30
craigevil
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1) Easy to install distros with GUI installers, MEPIS, PCLinuxOS, Xandros, Mandriva
2) Easy to learn and use right out of the box distros see number 1, plus Ubuntu

MEPIS and PCLinuxOS come with multimedia and browser plugins like java and flash installed. Xandros 3.0.1 OCE does as well.

You can use Knoppix or Kanotix to install a working Debian system.

It all depends on how much time and effort into learning the in's and out's of Linux.
 
  


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