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Old 09-30-2013, 08:18 PM   #1
hamurabi
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Smile Give me one benefit apart from cost to move to Linux


Hello,
This is my first post here. I have been using Windows ever since I can remember simply because it was what I found around me. So I have honed my skills over time and although I can't say I'm near perfection I have customized window so much that I no longer waste time doing mundane tasks like clicking yes etc etc.
The thing is I want to use another operating system just for the fun of it. Obviously I'd rather use Linux than Apple because I'm a guy who likes to tinker a lot. I was a die hard fan of XP and was coerced into windows 7 when my new laptop had no GPU driver for XP. I really hate when operating systems try to hide the processes going on. In fact I have modified my win 7 so much just to get much The thing is every time I look for reasons for using Linux over Windows I am overwhelmed by the one reason : Linux is free.
I will agree that Linux makes sense for users in the cooperate worlds where Microsoft or some other commercial company will charge a lot.
I am a single PC user. How many people who use computers end up managing servers ? Come to think of it paying a few bucks to get Windows for a single user is not a reason to abandon Windows, also given that I have loads of freeware in my computer. I use Sage and Octave for Mathematics for which I don't pay a cent. I use Open Office for documents, foxit for pdf etc etc.
Also I rarely get viruses. Really I think Linux is cool and would like to master it but I am just a guy who is never going to manager a server. Please give me one reason which makes moving to Linux worthwhile which do not have a 'free' attached to it somewhere.
I already have an i5 processor, 6GB Ram, 1GB GeForce 410m (not a PC gamer) with all the benefits that come with along. Give me a reason why I should start using Linux because once I begin I would like to continue for a long time.
I hope this is not taken as any form of slander. I really want to learn Linux (not Ubuntu) but can't convince myself of the benefits. If I ever learn Linux without conviction it will be just to say I know Linux (or a particular distro).
Thanks.

Last edited by hamurabi; 09-30-2013 at 08:56 PM.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 08:32 PM   #2
chrism01
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Why not just put Linux in a VM or dual boot for a while and try it?
If you like tinkering/customising, Linux is 'it' because its FOSS (OSS = open src sw ).
You can tinker all the way down, even into the kernel if you so wish.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 08:44 PM   #3
frankbell
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chrism01's suggestion is a good one. Try before you buy (or don't have to buy, as the case may be).

As for advantages, here are a few that I have found over my years of using Linux. Note that I did not set out to switch; someone gave me a surplus computer and I had wanted to try Linux for some time. I did. And that led me to eventually use Linux as my primary OS.

1. No defragging and minimal disk maintenance required.

2. Minimal or even non-existent concern with viruses and other malware.

3. More robust user security.

4. Faster on comparable hardware.

5. More logical file structure.

6. More configurable; gives the user more control over the behavior, performance, appearance, and functionality of the machine.

7. Easier to configure because of text-based configuration files.

And, finally, although these had nothing to do with why I switched--they are just added benefits:

8. No charge for upgrades for the OS or for applications.

9. Wide variety of desktop environments/window managers so you can choose one that fits your workflow and preferences.

Last edited by frankbell; 09-30-2013 at 08:47 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-30-2013, 08:55 PM   #4
hamurabi
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I've already tried. I have Fedora 13 installed in Virtual Box. Also I was trying to dual boot Slakeware and after going to the very last to select the video card I couldn't fine mine. I am using Lenovo v570. After spending so many hours trying to dog my way through I couldn't get past that window. In fact I had already formatted my HD clean because I wanted to immerse myself completely into Linux and give it a try from all my heart and I am also a determined learner. I have been using Matlab all my life. Because I saw a friend of mine doing some things in multivariable calculus in Mathematica and was blown by the ease and the beauty of Mathematica. I decided to learn it in 3 days and I am now doing all my maths in it.
The thing is I like to know my way. You see I decided to learn Mathematica although I already knew Matlab all my college life just because I thought there was a benefit of ease and aesthetic appeal. With Linux I still have no idea why I should learn it except to exclaim, "I too know Linux !!" just the same way I know Pascal, Delphi, Java, C# and not end up doing anything useful with them since all I need is programming some microcontrollers in C. So I can make a claim that I know Java (intermediate level) and still have no use/need for it.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 09:38 PM   #5
jamison20000e
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Cool

Freedom! Maybe more work (depending on what you want to do) at times but more rewording t!!! Plus, dual boot if you must.

I think VirtualBox is only cool the other way around.

Has anyone ever used all the smilies?

Last edited by jamison20000e; 09-30-2013 at 09:44 PM.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 09:47 PM   #6
suicidaleggroll
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Just one? Linux is faster, lighter, more secure, more stable, more consistent, easier to develop on (this is the kicker for programmers, especially cross-compilation and embedded systems development), more customizable, drivers for just about everything are already built in (as long as you pick a modern and flexible distro), and many more.

I have no issues paying for Windows, I have in the past, I'm sure I'll continue to do so in the future. There are certain cases when I need it, and I don't have a problem paying for it and running it. But even on machines where I've already paid for and installed Windows, I still use Linux 99.9% of the time. I'll switch to Windows when I want to play on Steam or when I need MS Office, but that's about it, and I despise every second I'm in it.

Also, running in a VM is a bit different than running on bare metal. For one, the video driver you select is NOT your machine's video card, it's your VM software. Same goes for the keyboard, mouse, network adapter, etc. All of the devices where the OS would normally interact directly with your hardware are being emulated by the VM software, which makes setup and configuration a bit different.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 09-30-2013 at 09:49 PM.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 09:51 PM   #7
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamurabi View Post
I really hate when operating systems try to hide the processes going on.
Reason 1: I use Slackware because I can configure it to exactly what I want, not less not more. I know any software that runs on my systems and I know for which purpose it runs.

Quote:
I'm a guy who likes to tinker a lot.
Quote:
I have customized window so much
Quote:
In fact I have modified my win 7 so much
Reason 2: As chrism01 and frankbell already pointed out, Linux is perfect for tinkerers (especially if you use a distro without too much automation). Everything is open and you can tinker even with the tiniest screw in the system. If it is not the underlying software it is look (just have a look at the screenshot section) and behavior that you can tinker with. I am not much a guy that needs the shiny things, but for me efficiency and consistency is important. Therefore I use a tiling WM (i3wm) and almost all my programs are configured to use the same keyboard shortcuts as my favorite texteditor, Vim.

Quote:
Obviously I'd rather use Linux than Apple because I'm a guy who likes to tinker a lot. I was a die hard fan of XP and was coerced into windows 7
Reason 3: Openness. With Linux you are not forced into anything. Don't like how the new version of your distribution looks or that it needs more resources than you want? Go ahead, install a different desktop environment on it. Don't like how your audio sub-system works? Go ahead, replace it with something you like. Don't like in which direction the development of your favorite application is heading? No problem, just fork it and do it your way.

Quote:
I've already tried. I have Fedora 13 installed in Virtual Box. Also I was trying to dual boot Slakeware and after going to the very last to select the video card I couldn't fine mine. I am using Lenovo v570. After spending so many hours trying to dog my way through I couldn't get past that window. In fact I had already formatted my HD clean because I wanted to immerse myself completely into Linux and give it a try from all my heart and I am also a determined learner. I have been using Matlab all my life. Because I saw a friend of mine doing some things in multivariable calculus in Mathematica and was blown by the ease and the beauty of Mathematica. I decided to learn it in 3 days and I am now doing all my maths in it.
The thing is I like to know my way.
Reason 4: Support and documentation. Most major distributions have very good documentation and fora for support and distribution agnostic fora, like LQ, do also a very good job. Most software comes with very good documentation. Anyone who is willing to learn can learn, without any restrictions or deliberate obfuscations.

Quote:
Give me a reason why I should start using Linux
We don't need to, you have done that job pretty good yourself already. Just go ahead, install a recent version of any distribution (Fedora 13 is horribly out of date and I never have seen Slackware asking for a videocard) and start to learn.

To correct a misconception:
Quote:
How many people who use computers end up managing servers ?
While Linux is widely used on servers, it is also very good on the desktop and for many other purposes. Do you have an Android phone? You are already running a Linux device. A navigation system? Most likely Linux. A smart TV or digital video recorder? A fridge with Internet access? A Kindle? A modern and somewhat smart portable media player? A Large Hadron Collider or a Space Shuttle ? All Linux. That is the point. Linux can be anything you want it to be.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 10:10 PM   #8
hamurabi
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TobiSGD, your forensic scrutiny is impressive. I have already jacked out my external hard drive looking at all the distros that I have. As I already mentioned I'm not really looking for another Windows, so I guess the choices of distros have been narrowed down. For some unknown reason I seem fond of names like Arch Linux, Gentoo and CentOS. If I'm looking for a distro that will be very fast (make full use of my hardware resources), do all my 3D Math and Physics simulation, allow me the ability to customize it and supports my hardware (Lenovo v570c) (which is one of the deterrents to my migration), what in your opinion is what I should go for.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-30-2013, 10:19 PM   #9
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamurabi View Post
For some unknown reason I seem fond of names like Arch Linux, Gentoo and CentOS. If I'm looking for a distro that will be very fast (make full use of my hardware resources), do all my 3D Math and Physics simulation, allow me the ability to customize it and supports my hardware (Lenovo v570c) (which is one of the deterrents to my migration), what in your opinion is what I should go for.
Go for Arch if you want to be able to set up a fast system that always has the latest software. Go for Gentoo if you want a system that is compiled for your hardware (Gentoo can also be setup to always use very new software). Compiling of larger software will of course take more time than just installing binary packages (like in Arch), but you can optimize software for your usage and your hardware. Both, Arch and Gentoo, are very well documented and recommended for anyone who wants to dive deeper into the system.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 10:21 PM   #10
jamison20000e
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http://www.debian.org/releases/testing/ ;great OS;

Last edited by jamison20000e; 08-14-2014 at 11:13 PM.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 10:22 PM   #11
m.a.l.'s pa
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You can take a Linux installation disk and use it to install Linux on as many different computers as you want to. Can't do that (legally) with Windows.

That and the following reasons that frankbell listed are probably my favorites:

Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post

3. More robust user security.

4. Faster on comparable hardware.

5. More logical file structure.

6. More configurable; gives the user more control over the behavior, performance, appearance, and functionality of the machine.

7. Easier to configure because of text-based configuration files.

9. Wide variety of desktop environments/window managers so you can choose one that fits your workflow and preferences.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 10:26 PM   #12
TroN-0074
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamurabi View Post
I seem fond of names like Arch Linux, Gentoo and CentOS..
The number one reason is that Linux will put you in charge of your system. That is why you should be using Linux. Install only what you want in your computer and use the format/file system of your choice.
Now the distros you mention above they are all great but it can be overwhelming for new comers. Perhaps you should go fo a distro like Linux Mint just so you could have a taste of it.
Good luck to you.
 
Old 09-30-2013, 10:28 PM   #13
hamurabi
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Thank you guys !
 
Old 10-03-2013, 01:19 AM   #14
graeyhat
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One could argue that Linux actually does not cost less than Windows when you convert time spent learning it into currency. Perhaps this "cost" you are referring to is the misconception of what 'free' really means. It's free as in 'freedom' not 'free beer'.
 
Old 10-03-2013, 09:02 AM   #15
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graeyhat View Post
One could argue that Linux actually does not cost less than Windows when you convert time spent learning it into currency.
You forget that learning Windows also needed time, so this can be neglected.
 
  


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