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Old 04-17-2013, 02:32 AM   #1
mnyakiti
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Lightbulb Getting started with Linux


I have been a user of Windows and also exposed to Sun Solaris and I would want to get started with Linux. How can I get started and fast track on the use of Linux
 
Old 04-17-2013, 02:34 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
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install a Linux distribution, e.g. mint, and just plain use it. Nothing beats getting your hands dirty.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:03 AM   #3
Keith Hedger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
install a Linux distribution, e.g. mint, and just plain use it. Nothing beats getting your hands dirty.
I'm not sure mint is the one to 'get your hands dirty' on as its based off of ubuntu and a lot of the underlying structure/configuration of the system is hidden, not that I,m knocking either distros, both are good if you just want to install linux and go ( I started my linux use on debian/ubuntu ), but if you want to learn the nuts and bolts and HOW and WHY stuff works instead of just clicking a few configuration buttons then I would go for Slackware, it comes in both 32 and 64Bit, is well supported with it's own forums and is very stable.

I would also use Xfce instead of KDE both of which are supported by slack.
 
Old 04-17-2013, 05:06 AM   #4
Snark1994
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hedger View Post
I'm not sure mint is the one to 'get your hands dirty' on as its based off of ubuntu and a lot of the underlying structure/configuration of the system is hidden, not that I,m knocking either distros, both are good if you just want to install linux and go ( I started my linux use on debian/ubuntu ), but if you want to learn the nuts and bolts and HOW and WHY stuff works instead of just clicking a few configuration buttons then I would go for Slackware, it comes in both 32 and 64Bit, is well supported with it's own forums and is very stable.

I would also use Xfce instead of KDE both of which are supported by slack.
OTOH, if everything breaks because you don't understand how things work then Linux can be a frustrating experience. Mint/Ubuntu are more willing to hold your hand a bit to get you used to the major differences between Windows and Linux, until you're ready to start looking at the nuts-and-bolts of what's going on.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:34 AM   #5
Keith Hedger
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"What doesn't kill our system makes us stronger"

We learn by doing, the poster said he wanted a fast track to learning linux, blowing up your system is a FAST way to learn, having accidentally deleted a 1TB drive I now make regular backups, I have learned!
 
Old 04-17-2013, 06:03 AM   #6
acid_kewpie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hedger View Post
I'm not sure mint is the one to 'get your hands dirty' on as its based off of ubuntu and a lot of the underlying structure/configuration of the system is hidden, not that I,m knocking either distros, both are good if you just want to install linux and go ( I started my linux use on debian/ubuntu ), but if you want to learn the nuts and bolts and HOW and WHY stuff works instead of just clicking a few configuration buttons then I would go for Slackware, it comes in both 32 and 64Bit, is well supported with it's own forums and is very stable.

I would also use Xfce instead of KDE both of which are supported by slack.
I find endless distro fights infront of new users much more distracting that the choice of distro. Mint is popular, mint is fine. If you have 7 pairs of sandals and a neck beard, so is slackware.
 
Old 04-17-2013, 07:12 AM   #7
Keith Hedger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
...If you have 7 pairs of sandals and a neck beard, so is slackware...
What? I no unerstand, you implying I'm a hippy? that's fighting talk!

I bow out gracefully and start to put out the flames
 
Old 04-17-2013, 08:22 AM   #8
michaelk
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Moved: This thread is more suitable in Linux - Newbie and has been moved accordingly to help your thread/question get the exposure it deserves.
 
Old 04-17-2013, 08:51 AM   #9
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Mint is good for fast starts, but if you want to become more familiar or confident with Linux I suggest trying to install LFS on another partition sometime. I think you could also build LFS even when you're in Mint. You just have to pretend that Mint was the system that your boot cd started. It's also easier to copy-paste stuffs from your LFS book to the terminal. Also try Slack.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:12 AM   #10
acid_kewpie
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nope nope nope. LFS is not an appropriate suggestion here.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:21 AM   #11
konsolebox
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@acid_kewpie and why is that?
 
Old 04-17-2013, 09:28 AM   #12
TobiSGD
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Because LFS is anything but for the new user. You need to be proficient with the commandline and should at least have the knowledge mentioned on the prequisites page of the LFS manual. Otherwise all you get from LFS is learning how to copy and paste commands that you don't understand and that is definitely not the goal of LFS.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:33 AM   #13
acid_kewpie
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yes, it also is part of leading to death by choice. Pick a distro, use it. that'll do for a *START*... longer term, plenty of scope for LFS.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:02 AM   #14
konsolebox
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Haven't I said that he could have Mint for a start? And also:
Quote:
I suggest trying to install LFS on another partition sometime.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Otherwise all you get from LFS is learning how to copy and paste commands that you don't understand and that is definitely not the goal of LFS.
Not really. Depends on one's perception but I believe something could be learned out of it other than those obvious and apparent.

Well those are everyone's opinion. The choice is still up to the user.

Last edited by konsolebox; 04-17-2013 at 10:06 AM.
 
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:39 AM   #15
Lennie
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Ubuntu/Mint is a good way to start learning Linux - but don't stay there forever if you really want to learn Linux. I broke Ubuntu several times a month first half year with Linux. That made me good at installing it. Then I realized I didn't learn anything new by just reinstalling it every time I broke it, so then I started to learn how to fix it when I broke it.

I started to read about LFS quite early, and made the decision I will one day build it. I went back and read about it again and again, finding out what more I needed to learn before I was ready to start building. (It took me a little more than 1,5 year to become ready.)

I learned very much from running Arch, keeping it updated and reading a lot. Their wiki is the best, and good documentation is most important.

So if you really want to learn Linux - then read a lot. But at the same time - don't forget to have fun. Have fun breaking it, and have fun fixing it.
 
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