LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-02-2011, 06:26 AM   #1
Wassock
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 1
Unhappy Getting started - really!


I've been here before - I am retired, not a computer specialist, and I very much like the look of Linux. I have tried installing just about everything, from Red hat through to Susie 11. They install, but nothing works, and I can't understand the technical abbreviations.
I have just tried to download the technical guide offered, but it won't do it as I don't have a company.
What DO I do? I am so frustrated ... it has been four years since I started trying, and I am no further forward!
 
Click here to see the post LQ members have rated as the most helpful post in this thread.
Old 03-02-2011, 06:34 AM   #2
kindofabuzz
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Memphis, TN
Distribution: Linux Mint 13, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 230

Rep: Reputation: 42
what do you mean nothing works?
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-02-2011, 06:39 AM   #3
unSpawn
Moderator
 
Registered: May 2001
Posts: 27,543
Blog Entries: 54

Rep: Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
What DO I do?
Given your previous thread I'd say start by telling us:
- what exact brand and model computer you have,
- which Linux distribution (or Live CD?) you are currently using, and
- what printer brand and model computer you use.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-02-2011, 09:33 AM   #4
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
Susie 11.
It's "SUSE", not Susie.

Quote:
I can't understand the technical abbreviations.
What technical abbreviations?

Also, are you interested in learning how Linux works inside?
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-02-2011, 10:13 AM   #5
Ignotum Per Ignotius
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Wales, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 67
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 40
If you've been trying for several years and getting nowhere, then I'd say it sounds like you could do with a walk-through in person from someone familiar with Linux.

My suggestion to you is to find out whether there's a Linux Users' Group in your area. (I see that you're registered as posting from Poland --- do any of these groups hold meetings near you?) Failing that, you can try posting questions here, but you will have to ensure you ask simple, clear and specific questions if you are to receive help. (There are guides here explaining how best to ask your question.)

...Hope this is helpful --- good luck!

P.S. I like the handle by the way: "wassock" is a great British word I've not heard since my youth...
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-02-2011, 10:22 AM   #6
devUnix
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
Posts: 557

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
I am so frustrated
Yes, you are!

Well, what do you want to do?

Do you want to use Linux or do you want to understand some advanced concepts of it?

Does no distribution of Linux work on your computer system? List your system configuration such as Motherboard, Processor, RAM (Main Memory), Hard-Disk Capacity or if you have any other removable storage device such as a USB / Flash Disk or Pendrive, etc.

Can you use Windows OS on your system? If yes, then you have three choices:
  • Remove Windows and install only a Linux OS
  • Keep Windows, and perform a Dual-Boot System activities by installing a Linux OS side by side on a separate (free) partition of your Hard-Disk.
  • Keep Windows, install a Virtual Machine (install VirtualBox and then configure a Virtual Machine (VM)) on it and then install a Linux OS on this VM. That way, you can work in Windows and also launch your Linux OS at the same time. But it requires a good amount of RAM / Main Memory (I would suggest at least 512 MB of RAM, it works- I am doing it on my system).

We are here to help you out. But, please, explain what problems you are facing. We will help you really get started!


Download some documents from www.tldp.org the first document that you sould look at is introduction to Linux available on the said website in PDF and other formats.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-03-2011, 01:43 AM   #7
Wassock
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
First of all, thanks to you all: some good advice, I'm sure!

The machine is Dell 5150C, 200Gb HDD, 3Gb DDR RAM. I use Windows XP Pro, s/p3, mouse and KYBD on bluetooth, internet on a 2MB Sagem modem. I have installed a double-boot system (SUSE 10.1) so I can go back to XP if needed. Printer Brother DCP-115C. I'd like, some time, to be able to run some small BASIC programs in Linux if possible. Otherwise, no special needs (yet).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-03-2011, 02:31 AM   #8
tommcd
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Philadelphia PA USA
Distribution: Lubuntu, Slackware
Posts: 2,230

Rep: Reputation: 287Reputation: 287Reputation: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
... I am retired, not a computer specialist, and I very much like the look of Linux. I have tried installing just about everything, from Red hat through to Susie 11. They install, but nothing works, and I can't understand the technical abbreviations. ...
What DO I do? I am so frustrated ... it has been four years since I started trying, and I am no further forward!
My suggestion would be to start over with Ubuntu. It is at least as beginner friendly as Suse, if not more so. Plus there are a TON of beginner websites and tutorials for getting started with Ubuntu. Here are some of my favorites:
The free Ubuntu manual: http://ubuntu-manual.org/
The psychocats site: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/
And for dual booting with Windows, plus lots of other great stuff: http://members.iinet.net/~herman546/index.html
And here is a dead simple guide to installing Ubuntu 10.10: http://www.howtoforge.com/the-perfec...verick-meerkat
Note: You do not all of the software that they install in that tutorial. Much of that stuff is redundant. Use only what you need or want.
As others have said, it would be a GREAT help if you could please tell us what model computer you have. Also, please tell us what exactly does not work.

I am not a computer specialist either. In fact, I have no technical background at all. I bought my first computer 8 years ago. I was 42 years old. At that time I was so clueless I did not even know what Internet Explorer was! I had no idea how to even use the Windows computer I had purchased.
So I started doing some reading. I managed to figure out how to use Windows XP. I had to read "Windows XP for Dummies!!!.
I did more and more reading. Eventually I found out about linux. I started with Ubuntu. I continued learning more about linux. Now I run Slackware, Ubuntu, and several other linux distros.
Nobody taught me this stuff. I taught myself everything I know. Rest assured, you can too.
Write back if you need more help.

Last edited by tommcd; 03-03-2011 at 02:34 AM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-10-2011, 09:39 AM   #9
devUnix
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
Posts: 557

Rep: Reputation: 46
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
First of all, thanks to you all: some good advice, I'm sure!

The machine is Dell 5150C, 200Gb HDD, 3Gb DDR RAM. I use Windows XP Pro, s/p3, mouse and KYBD on bluetooth, internet on a 2MB Sagem modem. I have installed a double-boot system (SUSE 10.1) so I can go back to XP if needed. Printer Brother DCP-115C. I'd like, some time, to be able to run some small BASIC programs in Linux if possible. Otherwise, no special needs (yet).
Your system configuration sounds great to me. It is much better than mine.

So, what have you learnt so far? Is there any problem at hand that you are facing?

Get familiar with Terminal which is found on a Desktop Version of Linux, i.e. under GUI mode also called X-Terminal. This Terminal functions much like a typcial Unix / Linux Console (or Konsole) and has many other advanced and sophisticated functionalities. In fact, it is a shell and you execute commands / tools / programs / scripts by typing their name at the Shell Prompt / Command Prompt.

Initially, you should become familiar with these basic commands:

ls
ls -l
ls -lt
ls -ltr
ls -a
ls -al
cd (or cd ~)
cd ..
cd dirName
mkdir
rmdir
rm -i
rm -r
mv
cp -i
cp -r
cat fileName
cat fileName1 fileName2
cat > fileName
grep 'Search Pattern' fileName
grep -i 'Search Pattern' fileName
ps
ps -ef (or ps ef)
top
last


When you know how to use them then move on to VIM Editor: vi or vim commands.

I am not mentioning what the above commands do.

You get a short description of each of them by typing (for example):

rm --help
grep --help

To get detail information:

man rm

To get yet more detailed information:

info cp

To get any confusion cleared, hit this URL in your web browser's address bar:

www.linuxquestions.org

and enjoy learning Linux without getting frustrated!

I do not generally advertise it, but just to show you some simple and easy to use very important commands, please, consider visiting my blog: www.unix-linux-dev.blogspot.com

 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-10-2011, 09:57 AM   #10
djsmiley2k
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Coventry, UK
Distribution: Home: Gentoo x86/amd64, Debian ppc. Work: Ubuntu, SuSe, CentOS
Posts: 343
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by devUnix View Post
....

rmdir
rm -i
rm -r
...
Be VERY careful with these 3, these are commands to remove files. Can cause disaster (you can cause disaster in other ways too but this is the easiest way break things )
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-10-2011, 10:10 AM   #11
devUnix
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
Posts: 557

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsmiley2k View Post
Be VERY careful with these 3, these are commands to remove files. Can cause disaster (you can cause disaster in other ways too but this is the easiest way break things )

Well, I would not call rmdir a disaster! Let the OP figure it out why.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-10-2011, 10:52 AM   #12
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,622
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
I've been here before - I am retired, not a computer specialist,
Its nice to see your spirit at this age!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassock View Post
I have tried installing just about everything, from Red hat through to Susie 11. They install, but nothing works, and I can't understand the technical abbreviations.
Now that you have landed here, there no need to panic, yes I mean that.
Red Hat and Suse are not much suitable for newbies, they need a some configuration to be done by the user.

For a newbie I would recommend Linux Mint: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=1581
Like Suse and Red Hat, it is another distribution of Linux, but it is much simpler, yes but you can't escape commands, Linux lives and breathes in them, but trust me, on Linux Mint installing and configuring softwares would be much easier than Suse or Red Hat.

I also recommend you NOT to use Ubuntu, the latest versions of Ubuntu are known for bugs and newbie section here gets filled up with people complaining and reinstalling their systems, when they suddenly stop working. The only version I have found to be stable of Ubuntu is 9.04, I am scared of newer versions of it.

You said that you don't understand the Linux abbreviations, I assume that you mean commands, again have faith in me, they
are easy to understand, if and only if, you are interested.

Now it is VERY necessary for you to ASK the EXACT question. Simply saying "it doesn't work", is not helpful, you need to provide what, when, how etc. info in the first post of your threads.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-10-2011, 12:08 PM   #13
djsmiley2k
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Coventry, UK
Distribution: Home: Gentoo x86/amd64, Debian ppc. Work: Ubuntu, SuSe, CentOS
Posts: 343
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by devUnix View Post
Well, I would not call rmdir a disaster! Let the OP figure it out why.
For some reason, some random libs require empty dirs that they may of created...
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-11-2011, 12:25 AM   #14
tommcd
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Philadelphia PA USA
Distribution: Lubuntu, Slackware
Posts: 2,230

Rep: Reputation: 287Reputation: 287Reputation: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
For a newbie I would recommend Linux Mint
I also recommend you NOT to use Ubuntu, the latest versions of Ubuntu are known for bugs ...
But Mint is based on Ubuntu. It seems likely then that whatever problems exist in Ubuntu would be inherited by Mint.
I think the reason that beginners may seem to have an easier time with Mint is that Mint includes multimedia codecs, proprietary drivers, and has some extra GUI configuration tools to make using the system easier.
From my experience, I have not had any problems with Ubuntu 10.04 or 10.10.
 
Old 03-11-2011, 12:28 AM   #15
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,622
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Mint is based on Debian and Ubuntu as they say: http://www.linuxmint.com/about.php
You might be rare lucky case, but if you constantly monitor the newbie section here, you'll get an idea what I am talking about.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] No sound in KDE when started by startx while working fine when started by kdm/gdm arj1singh Ubuntu 2 12-14-2010 12:55 PM
Started nautilus as root....problems started Chaosbringer Suse/Novell 0 11-05-2008 04:00 AM
Getting started jkline Linux - Software 3 01-26-2006 01:58 AM
Help Getting started reddog64 Linux - Newbie 9 04-18-2004 11:45 PM
Just started ...new here edhan LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 7 09-22-2003 09:48 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:36 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration