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Old 09-29-2003, 12:31 PM   #1
skate
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Question Gentoo Install...?


I have Gentoo Linux 1.4 for i686 in 2 cd-s and when i boot it from the cd i dont know how to install it on my HDD.....what must i type to go in the gentoo setup....for install...? and how to configure my X for Gentoo~?
 
Old 09-29-2003, 01:26 PM   #2
Demonbane
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After you boot the live CD, read whats on the screen in front of you..

direct quote from the live CD:

"View installation instructions by typing "links /mnt/cdtom/install.html" or "links http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-install.xml" for the latest version from the gentoo.org website"
 
Old 09-29-2003, 01:50 PM   #3
daveo
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Quote:
Originally posted by Demonbane
After you boot the live CD, read whats on the screen in front of you..

direct quote from the live CD:

"View installation instructions by typing "links /mnt/cdtom/install.html" or "links http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-install.xml" for the latest version from the gentoo.org website"
exactly, you'll not be able to install Gentoo correctly when NOT reading any manuals.....If you didn't look for a manual, you have downloaded a i686 install, for what kind of machine ? processor speed ....?
 
Old 09-29-2003, 03:52 PM   #4
skate
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i read the manuals but i dont understand it....can you tell me!
 
Old 09-29-2003, 04:17 PM   #5
bosewicht
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i have tried to install gentoo 3 times and all three times my video drivers are all messed up. I get errors when i try to
xfree-drm and the ati drivers don't cover it......i really wanted gentoo, but i ran out of options too...it's a tough install
 
Old 09-29-2003, 10:27 PM   #6
Demonbane
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IMO if you can't follow the installation procedures then you shouldn't be using Gentoo..
But anyway I'll briefly summarize the procedures for you so at least you know where to start, refer to the documentation on the gentoo website for detailed, step by step instructions:

1.Partition your harddrive using fdisk(you need at least a swap and a root, swap is not essential but nice to have one), then initialize the partitions with whichever filesystem you prefer, then mount the root in /mnt/gentoo.

2. Extract the stage3 bz2 tarball, and the portage snapshot from the cdrom to /mnt/gentoo (you're doing a GRP install). GRP files(software packages) to /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage, then chroot to the /mnt/gentoo.

3. Edit the /etc/fstab file to reflect your configuration.

4. Emerge(install) the kernel sources and genkernel utility using "emerge", then compile the kernel with genkernel(or do it yourself manually)

5. Install a system logger and cron daemon, and other pacages if desired (like rp-pppoe, filesystem utilities etc)

6. Create a standard user account, then setup the network settings(hostname, IP etc).

7. Edit /etc/rc.conf to change keymap and clock settings if necessary.

8. install a bootloader, then creat a bootdisk in case something bad happens

9. lastly install packages with emerge (Xfree86, kde, gnome etc) then you're done.

Last edited by Demonbane; 09-30-2003 at 01:49 AM.
 
Old 09-30-2003, 01:44 AM   #7
linuxetcx11
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A linux newbie should never try to install Gentoo
trust me, Don't even BOTHER

It would be like asking my grandma to go snowboarding, It's just not happening

Redhat 9 is the path i would recommend
 
Old 09-30-2003, 02:38 AM   #8
daveo
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Quote:
Originally posted by linuxetcx11
A linux newbie should never try to install Gentoo
trust me, Don't even BOTHER

It would be like asking my grandma to go snowboarding, It's just not happening

Redhat 9 is the path i would recommend
If you exactly follow the intructions in the manual, it will be a peace of cake. Aftherwards, you won't bothering about any installed dependencies, which of course also is handled in RedHat, but to keep a machine "up-to-date" Gentoo is the solution

When installing a program in Gentoo, it's automatically downloading the "source" by default, compile it and install it for you. That's what you'll want not if you would like to have a "stable" system, and again I don't say that redhat isn't stable .... it's just a little bit to commercial .
 
Old 09-30-2003, 05:41 PM   #9
godfather82
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Angry beginners CAN install gentoo

i disagree in saying that beginners shouldnt attempt to install gentoo. the manual is very specific on how to setup everything. if you can follow instructions you should have no problems.
 
Old 09-30-2003, 06:35 PM   #10
viniosity
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gentoo has its uses

For a newbie (and I still consider myself one) I think that going through a gentoo install can actually be quite useful and fulfilling. I learned a lot in the process of installing it for the 4th time (on the same machine...) I consider myself better prepared to handle problems in Debian because of it and have actually learned to appreciate some of the other distros that are easier.

If you've got the time to kill and the desire to learn (and the hard drive you don't mind reformatting..) then it couldn't really hurt to go through a gentoo install, right? (assuming you have the patience to carefully read the install instructions!) But, if you can't afford to spend the time and effort to learn linux then either stick with windows, go with an easier distro, or buy a mac.
 
  


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