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Old 01-04-2012, 11:23 AM   #1
Geremia
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FULL LIST of Entering Special Characters with Compose Key?


I have found many lists of compose key sequences for entering special characters, e.g.:
  1. This one
    1. It is lacking, though. E.g., it lacks ← and → ( compose + -> or compose + -< ).
  2. a fuller list: http://fsymbols.com/keyboard/linux/compose/
  3. the most comprehensive I've seen yet: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/GtkComposeTable
Yet none of them are complete. The interrobang ‽, e.g., is not on those lists; its sequence is: comp. + ? + !


Is there a complete list? Why does KCharSelect not say how to enter special characters with the compose key? Or does it? Thanks
 
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:14 PM   #2
David the H.
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Location: Osaka, Japan
Distribution: Debian sid + kde 3.5 & 4.4
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I don't know if there is a "complete" list outside of the configuration files themselves, due to the sheer number of them. On most systems (I believe) you'll find them at one of these locations:

/usr/share/X11/locale/<locale>/Compose
/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/locale/<locale>/Compose

This page offers a short script that will search your locale's Compose file for you (only utf-8 locales supported).

http://www.pixelbeat.org/docs/xkeyboard/

Just hand it the actual character you want to find the mappings for and you'll get a list of the compose sequences defined for it.

If you're interested, I've rewritten it into a more solid bash-based script that can handle multiple input characters at once. I recommend it over the original, of course.

Code:
#!/bin/bash

# List the X compose sequences available to generate the specified character.
# I.E. the keyboard key sequence to enter after the compose (multi) key or
# a dead key is pressed.
#
# This version has been heavily modified by me (David the H.).  It is now
# bash-specific, reduces the need for external tools (only grep is needed),
# and can handle multiple inputs.
#
# Original script info follows.  For the original version, go here:
# http://www.pixelbeat.org/docs/xkeyboard/
#
# Author:
#    P@draigBrady.com
# Notes:
#    GTK+ apps use a different but broadly similar input method
#    to X by default. Personally I tell GTK+ to use the X one by
#    adding `export GTK_IM_MODULE=xim` to /etc/profile
# Changes:
#    V0.1, 09 Sep 2005, Initial release
#    V0.2, 04 May 2007, Added support for ubuntu
#

if [[ -z $* ]]; then
	echo "Usage: ${0##*/} 'character(s)'" >&2
	echo "Multiple characters are supported." >&2
	echo "They don't need to be space-separated." >&2
	exit 1
fi

if [[ $LANG =~ (.*)[.]UTF.*8 ]]; then

	lang="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
	codeset=UTF-8

else

	echo "Sorry, only UTF-8 is supported at present" >&2
	exit 1
	#could try and normalise codeset, and get char with printf %q
	#but would not be general enough I think.

fi

dir=/usr/share/X11/locale #ubuntu

if [[ ! -d "$dir" ]]; then

	dir=/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/locale #redhat/debian

fi

if [[ ! -f "$dir/locale.dir" ]]; then

	echo "Sorry, couldn't find your X windows locale data" >&2
	exit 1

fi

page="$( grep -m1 "${lang}.${codeset}$" <$dir/locale.dir )"
page=${page%%/*}

file="$dir/$page/Compose"

while read -n 1 character; do

	[[ -z $character ]] && continue
	echo "combinations found for [$character]"
	grep -F "\"$character\"" "$file"
	echo

done <<<"$@"

exit 0
Example usage (I have it aliased to "ximkeys"):
Code:
$ ximkeys ←→‽
combinations found for [←]
<Multi_key> <less> <minus>      : "←" U2190 # LEFTWARDS ARROW

combinations found for [→]
<Multi_key> <minus> <greater>   : "→" U2192 # RIGHTWARDS ARROW

combinations found for [‽]
<Multi_key> <exclam> <question>         : "‽"   U203D # INTERROBANG
Be aware though, as the original script header says, that GTK uses its own internal mapping system by default, ignoring the X compose table, so some compositions may be handled differently in GTK apps.

Last edited by David the H.; 01-04-2012 at 02:18 PM. Reason: updated example
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-05-2012, 12:11 AM   #3
Geremia
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by David the H. View Post
I've rewritten it into a more solid bash-based script that can handle multiple input characters at once. I recommend it over the original, of course.

Code:
#!/bin/bash

# List the X compose sequences available to generate the specified character.
# I.E. the keyboard key sequence to enter after the compose (multi) key or
# a dead key is pressed.
#
# This version has been heavily modified by me (David the H.).  It is now
# bash-specific, reduces the need for external tools (only grep is needed),
# and can handle multiple inputs.
#
# Original script info follows.  For the original version, go here:
# http://www.pixelbeat.org/docs/xkeyboard/
#
# Author:
#    P@draigBrady.com
# Notes:
#    GTK+ apps use a different but broadly similar input method
#    to X by default. Personally I tell GTK+ to use the X one by
#    adding `export GTK_IM_MODULE=xim` to /etc/profile
# Changes:
#    V0.1, 09 Sep 2005, Initial release
#    V0.2, 04 May 2007, Added support for ubuntu
#

if [[ -z $* ]]; then
	echo "Usage: ${0##*/} 'character(s)'" >&2
	echo "Multiple characters are supported." >&2
	echo "They don't need to be space-separated." >&2
	exit 1
fi

if [[ $LANG =~ (.*)[.]UTF.*8 ]]; then

	lang="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
	codeset=UTF-8

else

	echo "Sorry, only UTF-8 is supported at present" >&2
	exit 1
	#could try and normalise codeset, and get char with printf %q
	#but would not be general enough I think.

fi

dir=/usr/share/X11/locale #ubuntu

if [[ ! -d "$dir" ]]; then

	dir=/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/locale #redhat/debian

fi

if [[ ! -f "$dir/locale.dir" ]]; then

	echo "Sorry, couldn't find your X windows locale data" >&2
	exit 1

fi

page="$( grep -m1 "${lang}.${codeset}$" <$dir/locale.dir )"
page=${page%%/*}

file="$dir/$page/Compose"

while read -n 1 character; do

	[[ -z $character ]] && continue
	echo "combinations found for [$character]"
	grep -F "\"$character\"" "$file"
	echo

done <<<"$@"

exit 0
Thanks for the excellent script
 
Old 01-05-2012, 02:21 AM   #4
SecretCode
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Registered: Apr 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Kubuntu 11.10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David the H. View Post
I don't know if there is a "complete" list outside of the configuration files themselves, due to the sheer number of them. On most systems (I believe) you'll find them at one of these locations:

/usr/share/X11/locale/<locale>/Compose
/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/locale/<locale>/Compose
Or at ~/.XCompose - if you or somebody or some utility has created this file. (This is the best way to add user customisations - it can include the full locale file.)
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 02-01-2012, 12:16 AM   #5
Geremia
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No ∞ symbol?

I can't find the infinity ∞ symbol. I wonder why.
 
Old 02-01-2012, 04:26 AM   #6
SecretCode
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Registered: Apr 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Kubuntu 11.10
Posts: 562

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geremia View Post
I can't find the infinity ∞ symbol. I wonder why.
Not enough googling?

In your ~./XCompose file, a line like this
Code:
<Multi_key> <8> <8>             : "∞"   U221E # INFINITY
will do the trick
(or whatever other sequences of keys you want to use - some people like <0> <0> - one guy likes <1> <slash> <0> )
 
Old 02-02-2012, 04:46 PM   #7
Geremia
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Registered: Apr 2011
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 208

Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SecretCode View Post
<1> <slash> <0>
Haha thanks
 
  


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