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Old 10-19-2007, 09:34 AM   #1
lin_myworld
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Registered: Oct 2007
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From begineer to advance user


I am a begineer in Linux
i want to that what u expect from a advance user..i.e. whether he is master in shell scripting or what else..
 
Old 10-19-2007, 09:45 AM   #2
saikee
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I think an advance Linux user doesn't say he/she is an advance Linux user.

Thus you may get yourself into whole lot of trouble for nothing, by not able to admit being advance.

A knowledgeable person is one who realises how little he knows.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 09:56 AM   #3
lin_myworld
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saikee View Post
I think an advance Linux user doesn't say he/she is an advance Linux user.

Thus you may get yourself into whole lot of trouble for nothing, by not able to admit being advance.

A knowledgeable person is one who realises how little he knows.
well but what should a person should know to start developing applications 4 linux and started adding to the code of some preexisting source codes
 
Old 10-19-2007, 11:35 AM   #4
RAdams
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That's not a measurable objective; there's way too many variables. Every application is different, and the learning curve for some components are much steeper than others. In general, to develop apps, you should be familiar with some sort of language, how it compiles and interacts with the OS, its limitations, etc. You have to have an objective before you just start cranking out apps. For where you are in your learning process, I would suggest becoming very familiar with how the operating system works, and what makes your particular distribution different from others, and what is in common. It would probably behoove you to study the following:

Objective C
Basic Assembly Code/Concepts
BASH & Shells in general
Python
RPM Packaging Concepts
DEB Packaging Concepts

Join a few developer communities. Their mailing lists/IRC channels can give you good insight on how development works.

Good luck as you learn.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 11:36 AM   #5
Dinithion
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Well, first of all you need to take your time. It will take time to be an advanced user. I don't even know what you consider a advanced user. I have been using slackware since 2003, and I'm not consider my self advanced yet. Like saikee said, "I think an advance Linux user doesn't say he/she is an advance Linux user." When you start studying and working with GNU/Linux, you will realise that its a huge topic, and you start "comparing" yourself to more experienced users.

This is not a correct way to become a advanced user, I'm not even sure if it's a good way, but it's my way. You have to be really interested in the topic and curious how things work. You could use a mainstream distro to get familiar with with the filesystem and start deprogram your brain from Microsoft. But one thing is for sure, you wont get advanced by using packetmanagers and gui-only applications.

You will most likely have to narrow your field also. Maybe you want to be a kernel hacker, a programmer, a system administrator and fokus on one of those topics. It's hard to be good at everything, although not impossible. So as you get better, learn how to install programs from sourcecode, learn how to recompile your kernel, set up a server with dhcp, dns, mail. Read howtos, spends hours reading from the Internet and tldp. Try out various distros. Try it out on other computers. I find it really educational to help others.

To summer up:
It takes time, interest, work and effort. If the interest is there, it's an "easy" and fun task. Good luck
 
Old 10-19-2007, 04:41 PM   #6
schenke
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It really depends on your interest: Linux Warrior (Developers) and Linux Supporter(User& Customer&Speccification Provider)

Advanced user might not have to know how to program in Linux platform. Everybody can code, if you know how to think in logical way. Additional, many Linux "warriors" are doing that everyday, the number of such software is beyond your imagination. If you feel lack of some functionalities, google around, you will find some package is already there ready for you. To make it work, i think, that is the first step into Linux world. Another thing is that you have to say goodbye to your beatiful GUI or fancy mouse for a while. (Just kidding)

Try to build your own email server, your own DNS server, web server, etc., a lot of fun!

Enjoy the journey!
 
Old 10-19-2007, 06:58 PM   #7
I_like_TUX
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I have to say this is an interesting topic. For me, beside reading alot and using command-line and config. scripts; I found that answering questions for other newbies also helps. It refresh my knowledge and I gain more by trouble-shooting new problems.
 
Old 10-19-2007, 09:15 PM   #8
mrrangerman
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Well I would have to agree with everyone on this topic, I've been working with Linux on a regular bases now for two year. I dabbled with it for three years prior to that. I think linux is like a ice-burg, what you see on the surface is nothing compared to what underneath. I think someone can know how to use Linux in a profitiant way and never really understand it, If you know what I mean. I will say this, I have learned more about computing working with Linux than ever with windows, I'm not bashing windows at all, so lets not let this thread run off that way. What I'm saying is, I've had to do allot more research working with Linux and therefore have learned more because of it.


saikee

Good to see ya (well you know what I mean) figured I'ld wander over hear and take a look at this forum. A bit more activity here but I think with the new changes being made at the home forum more will stop by.
 
Old 10-20-2007, 04:40 AM   #9
saikee
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I am sure experienced Linux users post here for a variety of reasons.

They gained the knowledge freely from others over a period of time in the forums. It is logical that they don't see the knowledge being a personal property and willing to pass on to others

If they know the answer and post it the OP will save time and labor to have his/her problem solved. That is pure charity.

At a personal level a Linux user can keep up to date by posting his/her opinion on the subject. If his/her view gets challenged then he/she can improve his/her knowledge, as learning from one's mistakes is a natural learning process.

Posting also help to keep a Linux user focused. One may understand the solution but to write something out to convince others requires a higher level of the understanding of the subject. For a start if a user is not confident that his solution cover all possibilities he would have to word it carefully. He/she must give sufficient thought to the subject before writing a reply out. They are exceptions of course like "I remember seeing a solution somewhere so why not Google it"

---------------
mrrangerman,

Nice to see you here. Apparently what we learn in the home forum proves very useful here.

Last edited by saikee; 10-20-2007 at 04:42 AM.
 
Old 10-20-2007, 02:47 PM   #10
lin_myworld
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Registered: Oct 2007
Location: India
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.04
Posts: 93

Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAdams View Post
That's not a measurable objective; there's way too many variables. Every application is different, and the learning curve for some components are much steeper than others. In general, to develop apps, you should be familiar with some sort of language, how it compiles and interacts with the OS, its limitations, etc. You have to have an objective before you just start cranking out apps. For where you are in your learning process, I would suggest becoming very familiar with how the operating system works, and what makes your particular distribution different from others, and what is in common. It would probably behoove you to study the following:

Objective C
Basic Assembly Code/Concepts
BASH & Shells in general
Python
RPM Packaging Concepts
DEB Packaging Concepts

Join a few developer communities. Their mailing lists/IRC channels can give you good insight on how development works.

Good luck as you learn.
well u have tell me something similar i want to hear...
thanks 4 it...

what do u mean by objective C....i know c language..and gr8 thing is that i m interested in phyton 2..so i start buildin up my concepts

can u tell me some verygood sources (must read 4 begineers ) related 2 all d things u have listed..u know there r lot of books in internet...and i toogh 2 judge wid which one 2 start...

tell me something about basic assemly...........concets
 
Old 10-20-2007, 04:40 PM   #11
RAdams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lin_myworld View Post
well u have tell me something similar i want to hear...
thanks 4 it...

what do u mean by objective C....i know c language..and gr8 thing is that i m interested in phyton 2..so i start buildin up my concepts

can u tell me some verygood sources (must read 4 begineers ) related 2 all d things u have listed..u know there r lot of books in internet...and i toogh 2 judge wid which one 2 start...

tell me something about basic assemly...........concets
Here are some recommendations, and Google will give you some more:

PYTHON: http://docs.python.org/tut/

ASSEMBLY: http://drpaulcarter.com/pcasm/ (a really interesting read, no matter how you want to program)

OBJECTIVE C (about): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Objective-C (I recommended it because it's a really great language for devlopment; but of course if "normal" C is more your thing, go for that.)

BASH: http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html and http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

RPM: http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/

DEB: http://liw.iki.fi/liw/talks/debian-p...g-tutorial.pdf (Couldn't find an online version, but this is a great guide)
 
  


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