LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-20-2002, 12:52 PM   #16
finger51
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 22

Rep: Reputation: 15

Quote:
Originally posted by jglen490
I submit to you that Linux has no more of a steep learning curve than any other OS. It is different from the "other famous OS", which means that if you are new to Linux but have become reasonably conversant in Windoze, you need to climb the OS learning curve again -- but the Linux curve isn't any more steep than the learning curve for DOS/Windoze, it's just that because it is different, you must climb again.

Linux is not rocket science, although it is used in rocket science !

Sorry-

I've got to STRONGLY disagree. I've worked as sysadmin for 4 years, I'm running 2 linux machines at home- one as email/web server and one as workstation.
The server is GREAT. I love Apache and Qmail. I'd suspect that the learning curve on a server would be far more advanced than on a common workstation, I found the opposite to be true.

The workstation is just that. WORK. flash website? sorry, you're running linux. want to use that rio? sorry, you're running linux. want to install that software? sorry, you running the WRONG DISTRO of linux. Or, the header files for you kernel are not in the 'expected location' - what the hell is that!?

ultimately I blame KDE and the fact that since linux is open source, there are few ENFORCED 'standards'. Standards for where key files are located. Standards for how devices are organized.

I'd be more inclined to put my mother in front of an XP machine than any distro of linux.
 
Old 11-22-2002, 04:57 PM   #17
sleepindaqwg
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2001
Location: N.E. Kansas USA
Distribution: MDK 9.1
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
To the very "newbie" newbies................ You might want to try the distro of Lycoris. VERY easy to install and use and even looks a little like XP. It does real well at finding the correct hardware in your system and from what i have played with in it, it's all pretty straight forward too. give it a shot
www.lycoris.com
 
Old 11-22-2002, 05:34 PM   #18
silent1_22
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
A good O/S to start w/for newbies

I will have to try lycoris and see how much easier it is than Mandrake 9.0. I'm a very newbie newbie. I've only used linux 5 times and that's including the last 3 days i've started using mandrake 9.0. It has recognized all my hardware and is running smooth. I even got the apache server running w/cgi/perl and mysql (well still trying to get the mysql to work with nuke php). Under mandrake in KDE 3.0 everything is coming along.

my system:
AMD XP 1800
512 DDR ram
3 hard drives:
80GB 7200rpm maxtor
13GB 5200rpm Wester Digital
3GB not even sure what this was is
Nvidia Geforce4 Ti4200 (which is working great thanks to this site)
Soundblaster Audigy platinum
Yamaha CD/RW 16x10x40
Creative DVD 8x
Haupgage TV tuner card (which works great as well)

And everything was recognized right the only thing now is learning how to install non-rpm files. Which i'm learning quite fast. Another good thing about mandrake is it comes with a software control panell where you can install and uninstall software quite easily for linux.

I'm a
 
Old 11-22-2002, 07:33 PM   #19
stickman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2002
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 1,552

Rep: Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally posted by finger51
Sorry-
I've got to STRONGLY disagree. I've worked as sysadmin for 4 years, I'm running 2 linux machines at home- one as email/web server and one as workstation.
The server is GREAT. I love Apache and Qmail. I'd suspect that the learning curve on a server would be far more advanced than on a common workstation, I found the opposite to be true.

The workstation is just that. WORK. flash website? sorry, you're running linux. want to use that rio? sorry, you're running linux. want to install that software? sorry, you running the WRONG DISTRO of linux. Or, the header files for you kernel are not in the 'expected location' - what the hell is that!?

ultimately I blame KDE and the fact that since linux is open source, there are few ENFORCED 'standards'. Standards for where key files are located. Standards for how devices are organized.

I'd be more inclined to put my mother in front of an XP machine than any distro of linux.
I tend to agree with jglen490. The learning curve for Linux is not any more steep than for any other OS. It's all a matter of familiarity. Most new computer users invest time learning Windows or OS X because that's primarily what is available in stores. When they encounter something other than Window or OS X, they automatically assume that the app is broken because that's not the way it works on their OS of preference. Personally I happen to find OS X very frustrating and inefficient in spite of the fact that mouse only has one button! I spend more time on Linux, Solaris, and OpenBSD so I'm not that comfortable with a Mac.

In addition, you can't blame KDE for some a lack of standards. It's one of the top layers on the cake. It's up to the distro creators to make an effort to conform to standards, whatever those may be. Some distro creators prefer different standards- ie, BSD vs SysV init scripts. What's even more annoying is having to configure a Unix system to accomodate some broken standard in Windows.

Some Windows apps have similar problems- ie, installing under C:\ instead of in the "Program Files" directory. You can't really blame that on Microsoft though. It's that app builder that decides the defaults.
 
Old 11-22-2002, 09:53 PM   #20
Mark_Grieveson
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Distribution: SuSE Personal 8.1
Posts: 15

Rep: Reputation: 0
Easy, Window-like OS

The first Linux OS I tried was a free version of Corel Linex 1.1. It was very easy to use. The problem was it was old, and Corel was no longer providing support for upgrading it. However, Xandros took over the Corel Linux OS, and I imagine that it is just as easy and more up to date.

The problem with up to date Linux distributions, is that if you install them on older computers (ie, with ISA modems or sound cards), you may run into problems. I ran into this issue with SuSE 8.1, and ultamitely had to get a PCI modem and sound card for it to work. So, if you have an older computer, beware. Ask if it supports ISA ports. Also, many internal PCI modems are winmodems (meaning, they don't work with linux). A hardware PCI modem will cost over $100 (Canadian), whereas an equally good ISA modem will be $20 to $50 or so.
 
Old 11-23-2002, 03:31 PM   #21
chilibowl
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2002
Location: woodstock-kingston ,ny usa
Distribution: Started out Ma R dhat 6.0 , then Suse 8.2 , 9.2 ,10.open suse , KNOPPIX 2.73 &5.1 DVD any Live dis
Posts: 147

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Anybody out here in LinuX Land Familiar with a MOTOROLA EXTERNAL MODEM Model #3512 CODEX ,It has 4 readFOUR inputs on the back and one connection for a NIC -network or router interface and a hookup to a phone or isdn line. Quite exotic,difficult to set up..... It should be HAYES Compatible
 
Old 05-19-2003, 11:36 PM   #22
crusheroz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2003
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Triple Boot

I noticed a few poeple here triple boot with what I am trying to do. XP (Primary) and Mandrake 9.1 with Redhat 9.0, cant seem to make them run, is there a trick to this? I am loading them with Grub for Redhat and Lilo with Mandrake and one knocks the other one out. Please understand that I am new to the linux community and am willing to learn and eventually make Windoze my secondary OS rather than my depended on OS. Not to familiar with editing the .configs to make them work. I have worked with the file system and editing some but not a lot. I hope that someone can help.
Thanks
 
Old 05-20-2003, 02:47 AM   #23
jt1020
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: root@localhost
Distribution: Fedora Core 5, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 537

Rep: Reputation: 30
you can remove Lilo and just configure Grub to point to Mandrake and you shall be able to tripple boot...

you can configure grub by editing grub.conf
 
Old 05-20-2003, 09:13 AM   #24
bubba169
Member
 
Registered: May 2002
Distribution: Manjaro
Posts: 175

Rep: Reputation: 31
First I use Win98SE, RedHat 7.2, Mandrake 8.2 all on one harddrive (a 60 Gig) hda1=Win98SE 20 gigs (Fat 32), hda2=RedHat 7.2 19.5 gigs(EXT3), hda5=Mandrake 8.2 19.5 gigs (EXT 3), hda4=Linnux swap 1 gig and hda3= an extended partition that houses hda5 with mandrake 8.2 on it. As was said earlier only use one bootloader Grub or LILO I use Grub at like it.

bubba169
 
Old 05-20-2003, 09:31 AM   #25
bubba169
Member
 
Registered: May 2002
Distribution: Manjaro
Posts: 175

Rep: Reputation: 31
The tricky part for me was where it says (hd0,x) the x part will be one number less than your hdax number for example hda5 will me shown as (hd0,4) look at my Mandrake entry to see what I mean here's my Grub.conf file:

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You do not have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /, eg.
# root (hd0,1)
# kernel /boot/vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/hda2
# initrd /boot/initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/hda
default=0
timeout=30
splashimage=(hd0,1)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
title Red Hat 7.2
root (hd0,1)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.7-10 ro root=/dev/hda2 hdc=ide-scsi hdd=ide-scsi
initrd /boot/initrd-2.4.7-10.img
title WIN98SE
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
title Mandrake 8.2
root (hd0,4)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.18-6mdk ro root=/dev/hda5 hdc=ide-scsi hdd=ide-scsi
initrd /boot/initrd-2.4.18-6mdk.img



Bubba169
 
Old 05-20-2003, 01:13 PM   #26
yodaonroids
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2002
Distribution: Mandrake for now
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
I found that my mandrake system may have been a bit more difficult to install then my win2k but all of my hardware runs better and the drivers where already loaded for me. I downloaded mandrake 9.1 from linux iso and it took longer to burn the cds then to configure the os, apps, and hardware. Never have I been this happy with an os linux or otherwise.
 
Old 05-21-2003, 05:56 AM   #27
DecimalPoint
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: not-SuSE anymore
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
In my opinion, the learning curve for Linux is easily much steeper then for Windows. That's because Windows gives you access to everything you need to access (or that MS will let you access) through a centralized point-and-drool interface. With Linux, you don't know what's really under the hood until you dig through a lot of hard-to-find docs, try to remember a lot of strange command switches and make a lot of mistakes.

I came to windows from Unix and found windows exceptionally easy to learn.

As far as the easiest Linux for newbies, you might want to investigate the smaller names. Although they aren't hard to install, I wouldn't recommend Slack, SuSE, or Debian for first-timers. I've heard Mandrake is good, and the base versions of RedHat (although I just hate to plug RedHat out of principle).

Last edited by DecimalPoint; 05-21-2003 at 05:57 AM.
 
Old 05-21-2003, 08:01 AM   #28
jt1020
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: root@localhost
Distribution: Fedora Core 5, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 537

Rep: Reputation: 30
In my experience... the easiest to install is defintitely Mandrake... Red Hat is a close second.... any of the two will be easy for newbies... although i disagree with DecimalPoint some of my friends who are just newbies installed Slackware and they seem to be doing well... Slack is also easy to install but is no doubt a little harder to configure... plus, Slack is a one of the stable distros...
 
Old 05-21-2003, 10:05 AM   #29
bubba169
Member
 
Registered: May 2002
Distribution: Manjaro
Posts: 175

Rep: Reputation: 31
My very first distro was Vector Linux 1.8 which was Slackware based I installed it and then had to learn about uncommentting lines, creating symlinks, startx, all that good stuff. I then went to Redhat, then Mandrake botnh of these did the "hard stuff" for me like setting up the symlinks for my cd-roms, setting up my sound card & NIC all through a GUI installer it was pretty easy and painless but I still think back to the very first time I heard sound coming from my Vector Linux box I thought it was so cool. So I don't think Slack is too bad it just takes a little more desire to learn to get it all setup.

My $0.02

Bubba169
 
Old 05-21-2003, 03:43 PM   #30
destry
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Texas
Distribution: Win2000, Lindows, Xandros, Mandrake?
Posts: 40

Rep: Reputation: 15
chilibowl-easy to use Linux distros

chilibowl, the two easiest to use Linux distros are Lindows 3.0 (soon to be 4.0) and Xandros 1.0 (soon to be 2.0). These two LInux Distributions will configure most modems, even the hsxxx series, get you on line with kppp modem configure, cd burner, cd player, limited scanner support and both have online updates. We have run most Linux distros and have had hair pulling experiences with all but these two.

destry
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trying to help the newbies... Agentvenom Linux - Hardware 11 10-15-2005 01:04 PM
Is Slackware The Friendliest Forum? Slack1_more Slackware 26 07-19-2005 01:53 PM
the best user-friendliest Linux distros? madskillz Linux - Newbie 9 10-05-2003 11:10 AM
What's best for newbies? dmedici Linux - Newbie 6 08-23-2003 09:29 PM
Newbies BetaPhil Linux - Software 8 05-28-2001 11:44 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:37 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration