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Old 08-24-2011, 12:50 AM   #1
BulldogJim
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Fresh start w/ Linux


Hey, all.

I want to set up a Linux home network between a P-4 Windows machine with a new 160mg (secondary) hard drive and another used P-4, also with a new HDD (1-TB). I would like to do a LAMP install on the server and a Ubuntu-WinXP dual boot on the desktop.

I have a factory Fedora disk that I plan to load onto the 1-TB server with LAMP components plus several partitions for old file backups. Then I would like to install Fedora and Ubuntu on the new drive on the desktop unit.

Is there an optimum sequence for doing this, and an optimum partition scheme for the server that will include b-u files and LAMP stuff? I'm asking because I understand advance planning is pretty important when starting out with Linux.

Thank you in advance for your input.

Jim D.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 01:10 AM   #2
chrism01
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You don't want Fedora on your server, it's basically RedHat's R&D distro, each version only lasts about a year and tends towards instability.
Use Centos : free version of RedHat's Enterprise Linux.
Wikipedia has articles on each if you want more info.

Please post the cpu/RAM/disk space for each system to help people help you better.
Do clarify if you want dual or triple boot on the desktop; you imply XP+Fedora+Ubuntu ...


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Old 08-24-2011, 02:38 AM   #3
BulldogJim
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Thanks for the reply. I know about Centos, and I thought about that.

My system specs are:
  • P4. 2.8ghz desktop and server
  • 2g ram ea.
  • Desktop: 1Tb Windows Hdd, 160gb blank drive for triple boot
  • Server: 1Tb blank drive

The only reason I considered Fedora is because it came with the text I just bought: "A Practical Guide to Red Hat and Fedora" by Mark Sobell.

I plan to serve up some personal websites I'm building and host a database I built in MS Access. Plus back up some smaller old HDDs.

Thanks again.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 09:19 AM   #4
DennisC31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BulldogJim View Post
Thanks for the reply. I know about Centos, and I thought about that.

My system specs are:
  • P4. 2.8ghz desktop and server
  • 2g ram ea.
  • Desktop: 1Tb Windows Hdd, 160gb blank drive for triple boot
  • Server: 1Tb blank drive

The only reason I considered Fedora is because it came with the text I just bought: "A Practical Guide to Red Hat and Fedora" by Mark Sobell.

I plan to serve up some personal websites I'm building and host a database I built in MS Access. Plus back up some smaller old HDDs.

Thanks again.

If you plan on reading up then I would say go with Fedora, CentOS, or shell out the $100 and get a copy of Red Hat that you can use yum with (thats what the $100 really buys you). CentOS and RedHat unfortunately stay WAY behind the times -- check out the version of the gcc compiler on them with the most recent version and you will see what I mean.

That gives RH great stability but sometimes there are new features you want in newer versions of software such as the gcc.

Last edited by DennisC31; 04-11-2012 at 06:26 PM.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 11:04 AM   #5
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BulldogJim View Post
The only reason I considered Fedora is because it came with the text I just bought: "A Practical Guide to Red Hat and Fedora" by Mark Sobell.
The version of Fedora that came with that book is Fedora 12, which is not supported anymore.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 12:26 PM   #6
BulldogJim
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I am aware that the version of Fedora in that book is not the latest version. The main reason I bought the book was not for the Fedora CD but because of the positive reviews for the book itself here on LQ.

I also thought I might have better results installing Fedora from a factory CD than installing my preferred distro, Ubuntu, from a home-made ISO.

Thank you for your response.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 01:49 PM   #7
TobiSGD
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I just wanted to point out that you can't install software from the repositories with that version. Of course you can use Fedora (and I would recommend that, if it is mentioned in the book), just use the latest version. By the way, i doubt that that version of Fedora is special in any way, it is just a pressed ISO, instead of a burnt ISO.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 02:16 PM   #8
DennisC31
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BullDogJim:

If you have any book in hand, you have the skills to make your choice of distro work. =)

Reading is a forgotten skill these days. Actually reading a book -- especially a technical one -- and studying it is also a forgotten skill.

Read 1 book and you will know what you are doing.

Read 2 and you will be able to be safe and not just dangerous.

Read 3 and well... you can call yourself an expert.

Last edited by DennisC31; 04-11-2012 at 06:33 PM.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 05:07 PM   #9
IglooDude
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Is the book Fifth or Sixth edition? The Sixth edition just hit shelves in the last couple days (I just saw it at B&N today), and it apparently comes with Fedora 15 rather than 12 which I gather is bundled with the Fifth edition version.
 
Old 08-24-2011, 09:56 PM   #10
chrism01
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Quote:
shell out the $100 and get a copy of Red Hat that you can use yum with (thats what the $100 really buys you).
Actually, Centos and Fedora use yum also, unless Fedora 15(?) has moved onto something else.
They just use different repos instead of the RHEL ones.
No need to pay for updates at all.
Also, the version nums of pkgs are not the whole story; see the update/patch nums also. RH backport a lot of stuff, so read the release notes if you really want to the fine details.

The manuals for RHEL/Centos v5 & 6 are here http://www.linuxtopia.org/online_boo...ion_index.html as are others. Free to read; enjoy.
 
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Old 08-24-2011, 10:31 PM   #11
frankbell
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You don't need a "server" distro to run a home server or the LAMP stack.

Pretty much any main stream distro with Samba will work just fine. I'm partial to Slackware or Debian.
 
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:55 PM   #12
BulldogJim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
You don't need a "server" distro to run a home server or the LAMP stack.

Pretty much any main stream distro with Samba will work just fine. I'm partial to Slackware or Debian.
My reason for wanting to install server software on a separate PC is mainly to learn how to adapt my Access database to work on a commercial server via MySql and Php/Python.

If I don't really need to install a server distro to do that, but just a LAMP stack, then I could basically use my second PC as a Linux machine and my primary PC as a Windows box, then share files between them. Right?

Am I over-thinking all this?
 
Old 08-26-2011, 09:11 PM   #13
bentbrewer
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You may just be. You can install any desktop distro and turn it into a server. Creating a lamp is easy and there are lots of guides that walk you through the process. Just do a google search - LAMP + MyDistro + Version.

However, I think the exercise in a headless install is worth the effort. There are some neat trick you can learn and you know what you are talking about when things aren't working as they should on the server. I would try any server edition you like and read, as the prior post indicated.
 
  


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