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Old 10-24-2005, 12:51 PM   #16
usaf_sp
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I recently switched to Linux. Specifically SuSE 10. I have tried all sorts of distros, but the easiest for me to learn was both Mandriva and SuSE. I am going to get flamed for this: The others, expecially Debian based required lots of configuration for my hardware, not the easiest for beginners. Each distro has its merrit.

The reason I recommend SuSE is:

1. It manages the RPMs (automated package installs)
2. Online update check for updates in security, kernel upgrades, software changes, etc. (Mandriva requires a license for these if you get the free version)
3. It found all my hardware and was able to use it. I had lots of trouble getting my tv card to work in the other Distros.
4. Integrated help and documentation. Infact the guide is in pdf format on the install DVD.

If you are using RedHat, then you should know how RPMs work.

The only problem with SuSE is that it often has graphics card/monitor problems.

Ubuntu is cool, but it comes on a single CD and requires downloading all the extra software you want instead of putting in the cd/dvd.
 
Old 10-24-2005, 03:57 PM   #17
jocom
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Registered: Oct 2005
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no srry im really a newbie

i still dont fully understand what a RPM is
and also dont know what a kernel is
could u tell me what a kernel is?????????
 
Old 10-24-2005, 04:23 PM   #18
Netizen
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Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Texas
Distribution: Slackware and Ubuntu
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Quote:
Originally posted by jocom
no srry im really a newbie

i still dont fully understand what a RPM is
and also dont know what a kernel is
could u tell me what a kernel is?????????
http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/k/kernel.html

You might want to spend some time here reading up on Linux...

http://www.tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/html/index.html

You can find more guides here..

http://www.tldp.org/
 
Old 10-24-2005, 04:55 PM   #19
beeblequix
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From one to another --

.rpm
As stated above, RPM is a package management system. Files take this form:
wine-20050524-1fc3winehq.i386.rpm .
When you obtain this file your Redhat Package Manager will be able to take this file and determine all those complicated bits in order to install it properly on your system (like, where to put it, what dependencies it has, if it's a "broken package",....). The thing that sucks about these package management systems is that if you have a distro that can't make use of the .rpm you'll have to look elsewhere for that file but in a different form. I know, I know. If you have a non-redhat based distro but want to use .rpm files just install alien (at least in cases of Debian). Then you can convert the .rpm into a .deb or whatever (?). Maybe someone with more experience could correct my statement...

.run and .sh
Some programs take a different form which can be more generic and even executable. Files that end in either .run or .sh are shell scripts. Browse filefront.com and you'll find "Enemy Territory 2.56", a free multiplayer game (sequel to RTCW but FREE). This is it's filename: et-linux-2.56-2.x86.run .
This one can be installed just by typing the filename (provided it has correct executable permissions set).

.deb
Files ending in .deb. Same difference as .rpm only it's designed for Debian distros.


KERNELs
Kernels in linux are analogous to different builds of Windows. Example -- LInux had Kernel 2.4.27 then released Kernel 2.6.8. Microsoft had Windows version 5.0 build 2195 (aka Windows 2000), a few years later released version 5.1 build 2600 (aka Windows XP).
Does that help or hinder?


Last edited by beeblequix; 10-24-2005 at 04:58 PM.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 01:54 AM   #20
tkedwards
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Registered: Aug 2004
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Quote:
(Mandriva requires a license for these if you get the free version)
Ahh no, menu->System->Configuration->Packaging and you'll see the update program there. It is, and always has been free and doesn't require any kind of 'licence'. Mandriva does have some kind of paid update service 'Mandriva Online' if you want it but its optional - you still get the same updates from the free mirrors.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 01:58 AM   #21
tkedwards
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Quote:
.rpm
As stated above, RPM is a package management system. Files take this form:
wine-20050524-1fc3winehq.i386.rpm .
When you obtain this file your Redhat Package Manager will be able to take this file and determine all those complicated bits in order to install it properly on your system (like, where to put it, what dependencies it has, if it's a "broken package",....). The thing that sucks about these package management systems is that if you have a distro that can't make use of the .rpm you'll have to look elsewhere for that file but in a different form. I know, I know. If you have a non-redhat based distro but want to use .rpm files just install alien (at least in cases of Debian). Then you can convert the .rpm into a .deb or whatever (?). Maybe someone with more experience could correct my statement...
RPM is a basic package install/uninstall system. All modern distros have package management systems which use software repositories to automatically resolve dependencies, Suse has YAST, Mandriva has urpmi/RPMDrake, Fedora and Centos have yum. Distros which use .deb packages use apt/Synaptic and Gentoo has portage for its 'ebuild' packages. Slackware relies on the user to resolve dependencies themselves.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 03:37 AM   #22
Eerath
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If I were you, I'd use a deb distribution. Using Synaptic is much easier than faffing around with rpms. Mepis is my favourite, but Ubuntu is well worth downloading too.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 03:57 AM   #23
reddazz
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Quote:
Originally posted by Eerath
If I were you, I'd use a deb distribution. Using Synaptic is much easier than faffing around with rpms. Mepis is my favourite, but Ubuntu is well worth downloading too.
APT and Synaptic also work on RPM based distros (even on Slack based distros using *.tgz files). Also rpm based distros have their own package managers e.g. smart, yum, urpmi so there is no need to faffe around with manual installation of rpms. Debian packages can face similar problems to rpms if installed manually, so this whole debs are better than rpms thing isn't accurate.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 06:18 AM   #24
thick_guy_9
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everybody likes to help a newbie...:-)

here are my 2 cents.

You can use any distro you like, but if you are a newbie, it is better for you to use a distro which has :

1. good community support
2. extensive package (or easy to make your own)
3. freedom (the GPL stuff)

Centos (or if you can afford, RHEL, but why would you want to?), SLACKWARE, Ubuntu, Debian (this is difficult) all have good community support (or you can find what you are looking for), good packages and give you the freedom to install what you like (unlike cripple-ware SuSE).

I suggest you go for Ubuntu if you have a reasonably fast machine (Athlon XP / P4) AND a broadband. Otherwise go for slackware.
 
Old 10-25-2005, 07:04 AM   #25
AntonyW
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Thumbs up

As one newbee to another Ive recently tried Mandriva and I am at present trying Fedora core 4. Both installed with no problems for me and both came free with a magazine from Linux Format. I now have almost everything running under Linux that I need and am seriously considering finally ditching Windows at long last.

AntonyW
 
Old 10-26-2005, 04:26 AM   #26
jocom
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hie again

i tried downloading fedora core 4 but it gives the wrong md5sum after downloading... anybody knows what to do?

after that i tried downloading SuSe 10.0 but my downloading speed then was only 3Kb/s
normally it is above 80Kb/s...anybody knows what to do?

i hope so...
lots of thanks

your everlasting newbie,
jocom
 
Old 10-26-2005, 04:41 AM   #27
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally posted by jocom
hie again

i tried downloading fedora core 4 but it gives the wrong md5sum after downloading... anybody knows what to do?
Download it again.
 
Old 10-26-2005, 05:28 AM   #28
jocom
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i tried to download it again but it gave the same wrong md5sum

i dont understand but i suppose it will give again the same wrong md5sum
what to do?

jocom
 
Old 10-26-2005, 05:33 AM   #29
SkyEye
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Quote:
Originally posted by jocom
hie again

i tried downloading fedora core 4 but it gives the wrong md5sum after downloading... anybody knows what to do?
Well, you could try a different download site. There are quite a lot of places who provides downloadable isos.

Quote:
Originally posted by jocom
your everlasting newbie,
jocom [/B]
So you are thinking to be a Newbie forever?

Last edited by SkyEye; 10-27-2005 at 01:17 AM.
 
Old 10-26-2005, 08:44 AM   #30
jocom
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Unhappy

Quote:
Originally posted by jocom
your everlasting newbie,
jocom [/B]
So you are thinking to be a Newbie forever? [/B][/QUOTE]

i dont hope so but im afraid i will

:S:S:S:S:S:S:S

jocom
 
  


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