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Old 08-28-2016, 04:52 PM   #31
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForumBot View Post
Thank you for the response.

I created a new user with useradd -m temp. When I ran su temp and then startx,
This is seriously bad practice. You should log out and then log in as a particular user before attempting to run "startx". No wonder you have so many problems! There are oodles of environment variables that aren't set properly if you su without a dash ("su temp" vs "su - temp"). You're going to make a mess of things.

Rather than try and be clever about exactly what the correct procedure is to su to another user, you should log out entirely and log in as the other user.

If this is the sort of stuff you've been doing, there's no telling how messed up your system has gotten. If I were you, I'd start with a fresh OS install. This time, make sure to never run any GUI programs as root.
 
Old 08-28-2016, 05:00 PM   #32
IsaacKuo
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The events happened in this order:
* I ran startx as lithoria
* From within Ratpoison, I ran su root to log in as root.
* From within the above terminal, as root, I ran firefox.
* I opened a new terminal without closing the other one.
* In the new terminal I was already lithoria, so I ran firefox.
* Firefox updated the display quickly.
Needless to say, don't do anything like that again. Besides the problems of running Firefox as root in another user's X session, you switched to root without a dash - meaning a lot of environment variables were pointed to the user's settings. And then when you ran firefox again as the regular user, you messed things up even more, because firefox doesn't start a new process if it has detected it's already running. Instead, it will open a new window with the currently running process...

Time to stop being too clever by half. Try using the software in the most basic way possible, as would be expected of a newbie. Don't use su at all with anything to do with X or GUI programs. You're not doing it right, and this is messing up your system in difficult to fix ways. Just do the more straightforward thing. Log out. Log in as another user. Don't use "su" with any sort of GUI programs. Keep it basic, and see how it goes.
 
Old 08-28-2016, 06:11 PM   #33
Shadow_7
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Quote:
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I edited /etc/group to add lithoria to the video group, which lithoria was not currently in. I didn't notice any changes in Firefox's speed.
You have to log in again for changes to /etc/groups to take affect. And you probably should use usermod instead of editing that file directly.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-29-2016, 11:10 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmazda View Post
'lspci | grep VGA' should be sufficient to see if there is more than just Intel.

Some hardware exposes bugs that other hardware doesn't. This provides an overview, but doesn't help with why Firefox only as normal user. Someone in a Mozilla-specific forum, e.g. on IRC, might be able to provide insight.
Thank you for the response.
 
Old 08-29-2016, 11:15 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
This is seriously bad practice. You should log out and then log in as a particular user before attempting to run "startx". No wonder you have so many problems! There are oodles of environment variables that aren't set properly if you su without a dash ("su temp" vs "su - temp"). You're going to make a mess of things.

Rather than try and be clever about exactly what the correct procedure is to su to another user, you should log out entirely and log in as the other user.

If this is the sort of stuff you've been doing, there's no telling how messed up your system has gotten. If I were you, I'd start with a fresh OS install. This time, make sure to never run any GUI programs as root.
Thank you for the feedback. I haven't run any GUI applications other than Firefox as root, normally run startx as only lithoria, which I log in as, and with a single possible exception, don't know of any errors occurring on my machine. Do you think I should still do a fresh install?
 
Old 08-29-2016, 11:17 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Shadow_7 View Post
You have to log in again for changes to /etc/groups to take affect. And you probably should use usermod instead of editing that file directly.
I didn't know that. Thanks for the feedback.
 
Old 08-29-2016, 11:38 AM   #37
IsaacKuo
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Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
Distribution: Debian 8 Jessie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForumBot View Post
Thank you for the feedback. I haven't run any GUI applications other than Firefox as root, normally run startx as only lithoria, which I log in as, and with a single possible exception, don't know of any errors occurring on my machine. Do you think I should still do a fresh install?
Yes. You do not seem to be aware of the things you have done previously which have messed up your system. However, it is likely that you will continue to do things that will mess up your newly installed system. Some tips to help you not mess up your system in the future:

1) Never use "su" without a dash.

2) Never run any GUI program as a different user than the one which is currently logged in. Log out and log back in before doing so.

3) It is okay to "su -" to root within any terminal (console or graphical) if you wish to run strictly command line programs. But be very aware when you do so about ANYTHING that can affect any files in another user's home directory. In your case, it's probably best to immediately habitually "cd /root/" after every invokation of "su -" just to make sure.

I'll be honest-I personally never use "su -". I only use "su" without the dash and this has never caused me any problem. But I am also very conscious and aware of the potential pitfalls of "su" so I'm always careful to only do the minimum necessary when su'd to root.
 
Old 08-30-2016, 10:51 AM   #38
ForumBot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
Yes. You do not seem to be aware of the things you have done previously which have messed up your system. However, it is likely that you will continue to do things that will mess up your newly installed system. Some tips to help you not mess up your system in the future:

1) Never use "su" without a dash.

2) Never run any GUI program as a different user than the one which is currently logged in. Log out and log back in before doing so.

3) It is okay to "su -" to root within any terminal (console or graphical) if you wish to run strictly command line programs. But be very aware when you do so about ANYTHING that can affect any files in another user's home directory. In your case, it's probably best to immediately habitually "cd /root/" after every invokation of "su -" just to make sure.

I'll be honest-I personally never use "su -". I only use "su" without the dash and this has never caused me any problem. But I am also very conscious and aware of the potential pitfalls of "su" so I'm always careful to only do the minimum necessary when su'd to root.
Thank you for the tips. I'll reinstall Arch Linux.
 
  


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