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ajhart 07-13-2011 05:30 PM

Find directory older than x and mv directory with sub files command
 
Hi guy's, I'm quite new to linux but I have configured a simple ftp server and it's working great. I have a FTP-Shared folder with upload and download subfolders. Under upload's and download's I have identical category subfolders like mp3's, movies, software etc. in both. As the guy's upload, I would like to create a line crontab where I can move all the content under /FTP-Shared/upload/mp3/* older than 14 day's to FTP-Shared/downloads/mp3/ recursively (Like in cp command), but the timestamp must be searched on the first directory and not sub files example: /mp3/Club Dance/CD1/Hallo world.mp3

This is how far I got:
[root@clients ~]# /usr/bin/find /FTP_Shared/upload/Mp3s/ -depth -mindepth 1 -mtime +14 -type d -exec mv -f {} /FTP_Shared/download/Mp3s/ \;

This command moves the directory and files, but it is not recursively

Any ideas would be great!!
Thanks in advance

theNbomr 07-13-2011 06:35 PM

If you manually type the command part:
Code:

# substitute the appropriate source directory, of course
mv -f {} /FTP_Shared/download/Mp3s/

what happens that you think is deficient? mving a directory by definition also moves all of its subdirectories; no recursion required. You would need only to iterate over all found directories that meet the time criteria, and the find command should do that.

--- rod.

ajhart 07-14-2011 01:16 AM

If I use the mv command manually, it works. It is only when I use the find command where it finds all the files and folders timestamp and moves them accordingly. It does not move the like in the manual command (recursion). Could I maybe use the grep command to find the 1st directory and the get the timestamp of that and then try to move it with all subdirectory’s and files?

Regards

theNbomr 07-14-2011 09:44 AM

Okay, maybe what is happening is that find is reporting the found directories in a depth-first order, so the lower directories are being moved first. To diagnose, insert the 'echo' command in front of 'mv', so you can see what is happening:
Code:

/usr/bin/find /FTP_Shared/upload/Mp3s/ -depth -mindepth 1 -mtime +14 -type d -exec echo mv -f {} /FTP_Shared/download/Mp3s/ \;
This is generally good practice when developing such scripts, to make sure you've got everything right before you start actually affecting the filesystem. Actually, now that I see your find command includes the -depth option, I think this is the problem. Remove that, and use breadth-first recursion.

--- rod.

ajhart 07-15-2011 06:24 AM

Thanks for the advice, I'll have a look into that.


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