LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-15-2016, 09:49 AM   #1
alaios
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: Aachen
Distribution: Opensuse 11.2 (nice and steady)
Posts: 2,185

Rep: Reputation: 45
Filesystem and filetype between windows and linux


Dear all,
We have some big data sets on a linux machine, running linux filesystem. We would like to copy files from that linux pc on an external device (ssd hard disk).

What should be the filesystem on the external ssd disk and what file type (raw files, big zip file, unique iso file) that would allow the best compatability between windows and linux? By compatability I mean mounting the hard disk with the copied files on a computer (linux or windows) and copying the files on the current-new local system (and not accessing the external disk files directly).

What would be your suggestion for the file system and the file type for the data sets.

I would like to thank you in advance for your reply
Regards
Alex
 
Old 08-15-2016, 11:19 AM   #2
smallpond
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Distribution: CentOS 6 (pre-systemd)
Posts: 2,609

Rep: Reputation: 702Reputation: 702Reputation: 702Reputation: 702Reputation: 702Reputation: 702Reputation: 702
Some issues affecting your choice are: file size, filesystem size, filenames (character encoding, special chars, length), character encoding of text in files, permissions and other metadata. FAT32 supports large files and long names and is compatible with many recent Windows systems.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-15-2016, 12:08 PM   #3
alaios
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: Aachen
Distribution: Opensuse 11.2 (nice and steady)
Posts: 2,185

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by smallpond View Post
Some issues affecting your choice are: file size, filesystem size, filenames (character encoding, special chars, length), character encoding of text in files, permissions and other metadata. FAT32 supports large files and long names and is compatible with many recent Windows systems.

file size... what do you mean? Yes there might be file sizes over 2 GB. Filenames all english characters.
All files are binary files and encoding if there is text is English. Permissions we do not care actually nor for metadata.
 
Old 08-15-2016, 12:21 PM   #4
Timothy Miller
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Arizona, USA
Distribution: Debian & Fedora mostly
Posts: 2,022

Rep: Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios View Post
file size... what do you mean? Yes there might be file sizes over 2 GB. Filenames all english characters.
All files are binary files and encoding if there is text is English. Permissions we do not care actually nor for metadata.
Might there be file sizes over 4 GB?
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-15-2016, 12:23 PM   #5
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,258

Rep: Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios View Post
file size... what do you mean? Yes there might be file sizes over 2 GB.
FAT32 is limited to 4 GB, so if you have files larger than that it might be a problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios View Post
Filenames all english characters.
Different filesystems have different rules about allowable and inallowable characters in filenames. For example, NTFS does not allow the following characters in filenames:
< > : " / \ | ? *
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-15-2016, 01:12 PM   #6
hydrurga
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Distribution: Linux Mint 18 MATE
Posts: 1,209

Rep: Reputation: 341Reputation: 341Reputation: 341Reputation: 341
As long as you don't care about Linux file permissions being saved, NTFS is the way to go (both Linux and Windows have good read/write access and it can cope with large files).

However in order to determine the best file types, you need to give more details of what kinds of data files you are planning to move, and which Windows programs will be accessing them (to see, for example, if they will be importable without further processing).
 
Old 08-15-2016, 06:35 PM   #7
Doug G
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2013
Posts: 593

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
As long as you don't care about Linux file permissions being saved, NTFS is the way to go
fat32 won't preserve linux file permissions either. I would also use ntfs for compatibility with windows.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 03:34 AM   #8
alaios
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: Aachen
Distribution: Opensuse 11.2 (nice and steady)
Posts: 2,185

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 45
is not ntfs buggier and less compatible with linux?
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:23 AM   #9
Timothy Miller
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Arizona, USA
Distribution: Debian & Fedora mostly
Posts: 2,022

Rep: Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539Reputation: 539
Not really. NTFS support is very good in modern linux.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:55 AM   #10
jpollard
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Location: Washington DC area
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Slackware
Posts: 4,599

Rep: Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241Reputation: 1241
The usual problems with NTFS are caused by Windows - Windows no longer really shuts down (it uses something between hybernate and sleep modes), which leaves the filesystem mounted. That leaves the filesystem corrupted when removed.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 03:55 PM   #11
beroal
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2016
Location: Ukraine
Distribution: ArchLinux
Posts: 18

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
You can install an Ext2/Ext3/Ext4 file system driver on Windows. I used an Ext3 partition in Linux and Windows for several years without any hassle. But I don't recommend Ext3 for big files.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 08:48 PM   #12
Doug G
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2013
Posts: 593

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by beroal View Post
You can install an Ext2/Ext3/Ext4 file system driver on Windows. I used an Ext3 partition in Linux and Windows for several years without any hassle. But I don't recommend Ext3 for big files.
You can, but personally I don't trust the available ext windows drivers. I haven't used one recently but a couple years ago I installed a driver on a dual boot machine, and not long after ended up with a couple trashed files on the ext3 filesystem.
 
Old 08-17-2016, 10:32 PM   #13
mrmazda
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2016
Location: USA
Distribution: several
Posts: 93

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
If you can transfer files across a LAN rather via directly attached USB or eSATA HD or SSD, then you have much flexibility, including use of NAS as the HD or SSD to transfer those files to.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wine filetype association with linux application simone.garza Linux - Software 0 07-23-2007 09:55 AM
Which filesystem is best linux and windows? effekt Linux - Newbie 7 01-31-2007 09:45 PM
Windows / Linux shared filesystem? corfe Linux - General 8 08-23-2006 12:52 AM
Filesystem for Windows and Linux stevenh Linux - Newbie 8 03-27-2006 07:22 AM
HD filetype conversion (Linux won't read) goofytoad Linux - Hardware 7 01-10-2006 06:17 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:39 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration