LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-04-2004, 07:55 PM   #46
youngstorm
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: USA
Distribution: Fedora 21, RHEL 5,6&7, Windoze 7
Posts: 235

Rep: Reputation: 31

Hi Paul,
I'm back from supper. Try this.
Once you have mounted the partition,
do "cd tmpdir"
if you get no errors you can
do "cd etc"
if you get no errors you can
do "cd sysconfig"
if you get no errors you can
do "ls"
to see if you can see the file
do you see it?
then do "pico firstboot"
if not, do you see any other files?
name some.

Michael
 
Old 06-04-2004, 10:59 PM   #47
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Motub,

Thanks...I just know that it's VERY annoying to try to help one of us (newbies) especially since I know nothing about Linux.

I really want to get this to work for no other reason than I can't now...does that make sense? I don't like to give up so if you guys don't mind...I'm gonna keep going.

Also, when I tried to "man", I get unknown command or something similar to that. I hadn't heard about "CD" yet so I'll give that a try.

Youngstorm,

Cool beans dude...I've give that a go and report back. It probably won't be until Saturday however so if I don't hear back from you during the weekend, I'll read and learn until we get to talk again.

Both of you...my many thanks! If I'm every made a millionaire, expect large amounts of compensation.

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-05-2004, 09:09 PM   #48
motub
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: The Netherlands
Distribution: Gentoo (main); SuSE 9.3 (fallback)
Posts: 1,607

Rep: Reputation: 46
The problem with your commands is that they're not in the $PATH$-- if the PATH statement is even created yet.

When you type a known command, Linux (like every other OS) looks in several directories known to commonly hold such binary executables.

For instance, you can type "notepad" in a Windows Run box because Windows looks in C:\Windows\, C:\Windows\System, and a couple of other places to see if the notepad executable is there. Since Notepad normally lives in C:\Windows (or C:\WinNT), the executable is found without need for further input from you. If it was not found, you would have to type the full pathname before the executable name (and stick the .exe on the end) in order to run the program.

For Linux, the usual $PATH$ statement-- $PATH$ is an environment variable, which can be configured (thus, "variable") for the environment of a particular OS-- consists of the standard binary directories:

/bin
/sbin (root only)
/usr/bin
/usr/sbin (root only)
/usr/local/bin

and whatever additional directories individual programs have added when installed (if they install to an unusual location, the way Java does), so that they can be found when run with just the binary name.

Your problem is that even if your $PATH statement exists, the directories where the statement is telling the shell to look don't exist (or rather, the directories are not mounted to the locations in the $PATH statement). So nothing can be found.

However, if you found the /etc/ directory, you should be able to find the other common directories listed above (you'd find common commands like man and the like in /bin, which should be a folder in the same directory where you found /etc/).

Chroot is sounding better and better to me with each second. But how are you doing about maybe downloadind burning a copy of Knoppix?

Last edited by motub; 06-05-2004 at 09:10 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2004, 12:10 PM   #49
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Well...

Since I live six miles beyond the middle of nowhere and Verizon can't seem to keep our phone working when it rains (and it NEVER quits raining)...I was without the internet for the entire day Saturday.

Apparently, the phone-gods have smiled gently down upon me this day (Sunday) and I'm back.

To update...I will hopefully have a copy of Knoppix this evening. I have a friend who is downloading it for me today and if all goes well, I'll be able to use it tonight at some point.

Thanks for the continued patience everyone

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-06-2004, 11:40 PM   #50
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Woo Hoo...I am typing this from a working Knoppix CD.

I'm ready for my tutorial to resume!

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-07-2004, 03:56 AM   #51
motub
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: The Netherlands
Distribution: Gentoo (main); SuSE 9.3 (fallback)
Posts: 1,607

Rep: Reputation: 46
Yahoo! Now you will learn the true power of the Live CD distributions (Knoppix was originally created as a fancy, fully-functional system rescue disc).

By the way, if you want to give this up and just install Knoppix, you can do that, too .

But OK, here's what we want to do... We want to start from the beginning of all this to make sure we know what we're doing-- we've wandered far afield in our travels .

OK, the original problem was that you could not boot into your newly installed FC1 system, because the Firstboot Wizard, responsible for final configuration options, would not run.

There are two proposed solutions to this:

1) get the boot process to skip the Firstboot Wizard and just go on;
2) Try to correct the error so that the Firstboot Wizard will run properly.

I'm aiming for #2, as I strongly suspect that the Firstboot Wizard may finalize some important settings that the system should not be run without setting.

So let's try to get it working.

You were previously advised to edit the XFree86 configuration file, and that's a good place to start, as the most likely reason that the Firstboot Wizard is not able to run is that it is not able to be displayed (because your X settings are not working; supported by the fact that you couldn't do a graphical install in the first place).

So we need to see the contents of two files:

1) your bootloader configuration file (either grub.conf or menu.lst, both found in /boot/grub/); and

2) the XFree86 config file (found in /etc/ or /etc/X11/; named XF86Config or XF86Config-4).

For the following two steps you will need root access, but since the first one takes place in a file manager, you can use one of the minor advantages of the KDE desktop environment. Look in your Kicker (that's the proper name of the "K-menu", analagous to the Start Menu in Windows, on the end of your panel, where there's a "K" icon), and look in System Tools for "File Manager (Super User)". When you select this entry, you may be given a password dialog; there is no root password for Knoppix, so just leave it blank and hit OK. This should get you to the root access version of Konqueror, KDE's file manager and web browser (don't browse the web while root, please!). Now being a Live CD and not installed to the HDD, Knoppix (like all other Live CDs) does some legerdemain to make the filesystem look like it's on your HDD, but we don't care about that. What we want is to see the location of the mount point for your HDD partitions, and create one if necessary (that's why we need root access; if we just wanted to look, we could do that as a user, but you might as well learn the lay of the land now, and get a little practice in with the tools you will have available to you under Linux).

You should be in root's home directory, which is called /root/. The idea behind this is that if there was a problem with the /home section of the filetree, and root had to log in to fix it, it wouldn't do much good if root's home directory was in /home with the other borked files, as then root couldn't log in either (since all your personal config files are in your home directory).

So go up a level to the Knoppix / (filetree root). Then go down to /mnt/. Are there folders there representing the various HDD partitions (there should be)? If so, you're done here; just make a note of the names of the folders. If not, we'd have to create one, which is probably a big pain on a Live CD, but hopefully could be done (if necessary, which it probably is not) via the normal means of choosing File=>New=>Directory from the menu. If this seems to be necessary, and seems to be possible, name the directory something like FC1. Leave the FM (file manager) open; we'll be needing it later.

Now open a console (Konsole, since it's KDE) and type su and hit Enter. Normally you would need root's password, but this has not been set for Knoppix, so no worries there.

Your prompt will change from a "$", indicating user access, to a "#", indicating root access, and all commands typed into this terminal will be performed as if root had requested them (this is why you never need to log in as root under Linux, unless the system won't boot, or your user account is borked). Requests performed from the desktop, the panel or any other console/Konsole/terminal will still be performed with user access.

So su to root and type mount /mnt/hdb3 (or whatever the name of the mount point is). If that doesn't work, try mount -t ext3 (I assume the filesystem is ext3, if not use the appropriate one, such as ext2 or reiserfs) /dev/hdb3 /mnt/hdb3.

This should mount your half-finished FC partition. We also want to mount your /boot partition, if that was created as a separate partition from the main filetree, but first we have to find out if that was done or not.

So back to the file manager that you left open, and head over to the mount point you just mounted hdb3 to. See if there's a /boot directory, and if so, are there any files in it. If so, then go to the /grub directory, find menu.lst or grub.conf (whichever exists), select it and right-click, then choose Open With.... and choose a text editor (I like Kate, but you can use Kedit if you want; KWrite is a bit too much for this job). The file will open in a text editor.

If there are no folders or files in /boot, we'll have to mount that separately, but atm we don't know what partition it's on. Best guess is obviously /dev/hdb2, as that's the only possible choice (/boot is not on any partition formatted as Linux Swap, and hdb2 is the only other Linux fs available).

So mount /dev/hdb2 the same way you mounted /dev/hdb3, and follow the steps above to open up the grub config file in a text editor.

Now browse to the /etc folder in /mnt/hdb3 (or whatever the mount point is for hdb3) and look for either XF86Config, or XF86Config-4 in /etc/ itself or look for one of these same two files in /etc/X11/.

When you find one, right-click it, and open it in a text editor the same way you did before.

Select the text of each of the open files and post them here using Mozilla or the user-access Konqueror Web Browser, and then we'll go further (or youngstorm will be back and will have instructions for how to disable this firstboot thing ).
 
Old 06-07-2004, 12:26 PM   #52
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Motub,

You warned me "not to browse the web while root".

Once I log-in as root, how do I unlog-in as root?

I've printed out your instructions as I'm now booted up in Knoppix and typing from there at the moment.

I'm going to look around a bit and hopefully get your reply before I continue but if not...I'll head up to the wife's PC to reply if I need help.

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-07-2004, 12:47 PM   #53
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
I cannot log in in the File Manager as SU. Leaving the password blank doesn't work..

Suggestions?

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-07-2004, 01:02 PM   #54
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
I found this in the Knoppix Security Text

"You can create valid passwords using "sudo passwd [username]" from the Shell, individually"

Does that help?

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-07-2004, 06:55 PM   #55
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Up we go

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-07-2004, 11:22 PM   #56
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Ok...did a little more digging and I was able to figure out how to get to the places you needed me to get to.

When I went to /mnt/ there were drives in there. In /mnt/hdb3 (where my Fedora Core 1 system is loaded...there is NOTHING in the /boot/ folder and in /root/ there are three (3) files:

anaconda-ks.cfg
install.log
install.log.syslog

Here what I found in /mnt/hdb2/grub. It's the "menu.1st" file:

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd1,1)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/hdb3
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/hda
default=0
timeout=10
splashimage=(hd1,1)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
password --md5 $1$d1/UEApl$aVi/IWhqONCIcXtEKAmJJ/
title Fedora Core (2.4.22-1.2115.nptlsmp)
root (hd1,1)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2115.nptlsmp ro root=LABEL=/ hdd=ide-scsi rhgb
initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2115.nptlsmp.img
title Fedora Core-up (2.4.22-1.2115.nptl)
root (hd1,1)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2115.nptl ro root=LABEL=/ hdd=ide-scsi rhgb
initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2115.nptl.img
title DOS
rootnoverify (hd0,1)
chainloader +1hr

And finally...in /mnt/hdb3/etc, there was neither an XF86Config or XF86Config-4. I was able to find the following in /mnt/hdb3/etc/X11:

# XFree86 4 configuration created by pyxf86config

Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Default Layout"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection

Section "Files"
# RgbPath is the location of the RGB database. Note, this is the name of the
# file minus the extension (like ".txt" or ".db"). There is normally
# no need to change the default.

# Multiple FontPath entries are allowed (they are concatenated together)
# By default, Red Hat 6.0 and later now use a font server independent of
# the X server to render fonts.

RgbPath "/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/rgb"
FontPath "unix/:7100"
EndSection

Section "Module"
Load "dbe"
Load "extmod"
Load "fbdevhw"
Load "glx"
Load "record"
Load "freetype"
Load "type1"
Load "dri"
EndSection

Section "InputDevice"
# Specify which keyboard LEDs can be user-controlled (eg, with xset(1))
# Option "Xleds" "1 2 3"

# To disable the XKEYBOARD extension, uncomment XkbDisable.
# Option "XkbDisable"

# To customise the XKB settings to suit your keyboard, modify the
# lines below (which are the defaults). For example, for a non-U.S.
# keyboard, you will probably want to use:
# Option "XkbModel" "pc102"
# If you have a US Microsoft Natural keyboard, you can use:
# Option "XkbModel" "microsoft"
#
# Then to change the language, change the Layout setting.
# For example, a german layout can be obtained with:
# Option "XkbLayout" "de"
# or:
# Option "XkbLayout" "de"
# Option "XkbVariant" "nodeadkeys"
#
# If you'd like to switch the positions of your capslock and
# control keys, use:
# Option "XkbOptions" "ctrl:swapcaps"
# Or if you just want both to be control, use:
# Option "XkbOptions" "ctrl:nocaps"
#
Identifier "Keyboard0"
Driver "keyboard"
Option "XkbRules" "xfree86"
Option "XkbModel" "pc105"
Option "XkbLayout" "us"
EndSection

Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Mouse0"
Driver "mouse"
Option "Protocol" "IMPS/2"
Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice"
Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
Option "Emulate3Buttons" "yes"
EndSection

Section "InputDevice"
# If the normal CorePointer mouse is not a USB mouse then
# this input device can be used in AlwaysCore mode to let you
# also use USB mice at the same time.
Identifier "DevInputMice"
Driver "mouse"
Option "Protocol" "IMPS/2"
Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice"
Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
Option "Emulate3Buttons" "no"
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
VendorName "Monitor Vendor"
ModelName "CM615"
DisplaySize 330 250
HorizSync 31.0 - 70.0
VertRefresh 50.0 - 99.0
Option "dpms"
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "Videocard0"
Driver "radeon"
VendorName "Videocard vendor"
BoardName "ATI Radeon 9800"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Videocard0"
Monitor "Monitor0"
DefaultDepth 24
SubSection "Display"
Depth 24
Modes "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
EndSubSection
EndSection

Section "DRI"
Group 0
Mode 0666
EndSection

K...I hope some of this helps a little.

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-08-2004, 04:04 PM   #57
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Up we go again...

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-09-2004, 07:47 PM   #58
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Uhmmm....guys?

Help?

What have I done to offend thee?

Regards,
Paul
 
Old 06-10-2004, 10:50 AM   #59
youngstorm
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: USA
Distribution: Fedora 21, RHEL 5,6&7, Windoze 7
Posts: 235

Rep: Reputation: 31
Hi Paul,
I do most of my posting at work. Normally this
is not a problem but my boss has been out
so I've been very bussy. And right now
I'm not sure what Motub is planning to do
about your problem. I can walk you through
turning off firstboot but I was concerned
it might cause problems with me telling
you to do one thing and Motub telling you
another.
Do want me to do that while Motub is away?

Michael

Last edited by youngstorm; 06-10-2004 at 10:51 AM.
 
Old 06-10-2004, 04:55 PM   #60
Paul Fox
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Edmond WV
Distribution: SuSE 9.2 Professional, Fedora Core 1, Knoppix 3.4
Posts: 49

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Just so you know...I have been able to get around the "firstboot" problem a few times using the interactive setup. When it comes to "firstboot", I simply say "no" and the boot procedure continues as normal. The bad things is that AS SOON AS I LOG-IN as root, the computer locks up TIGHT once again.

As far as the help...don't worry...I'm trying everything I can and really appreciate your assitance.

Just hang in there and keep trying!

Regards,
Paul
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fedora Core 4 newbie problem EvilAngel Fedora - Installation 8 11-24-2005 02:07 PM
Uninstalling Fedora Core 3 : Newbie darkknight1984 Fedora 1 02-12-2005 10:17 AM
SQL Server on Fedora Core ! Newbie Help nitinku5021a Linux - Software 3 07-04-2004 06:47 AM
2 Newbie questions about Fedora Core 2 hahler2 Fedora 6 06-16-2004 02:56 PM
Fedora core 1 newbie help please bumble Fedora 0 06-01-2004 03:27 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:32 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration