LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-08-2009, 08:45 PM   #1
L1nuxn00b703
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: 15
fdisk vs parted


Hi all,

what the difference between fdisk and parted? when do i use one or the other? Thanks.
 
Old 09-08-2009, 09:12 PM   #2
j_jerry
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Distribution: fedora 11
Posts: 318

Rep: Reputation: 46
man fdisk , man parted

man can explain a lot better than us!
 
Old 09-08-2009, 09:13 PM   #3
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,615
Blog Entries: 26

Rep: Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986Reputation: 1986
Hi,

You could 'man command' to understand;

Quote:
excerpt 'man parted';

GNU Parted - a partition manipulation program
SYNOPSIS
parted [options] [device [command [options...]...]]
DESCRIPTION
This manual page documents briefly the parted command. Complete documentation is distributed with the package in GNU Info format; see below.

parted is a disk partitioning and partition resizing program. It allows you to create, destroy, resize, move and copy ext2, ext3, linux-swap, FAT and FAT32 partitions. This is useful for creating space for new operating systems, reorganising disk usage, and copying data to new hard disks.
Quote:
excerpt 'man fdisk';
fdisk - Partition table manipulator for Linux
SYNOPSIS
fdisk [-u] [-b sectorsize] [-C cyls] [-H heads] [-S sects] device

fdisk -l [-u] [device ...]

fdisk -s partition ...

fdisk -v
DESCRIPTION
Hard disks can be divided into one or more logical disks called partitions. This division is described in the partition table found in sector 0 of the disk.

In the BSD world one talks about `disk slices' and a `disklabel'.

Linux needs at least one partition, namely for its root file system. It can use swap files and/or swap partitions, but the latter are more efficient. So, usually one will want a second Linux partition dedicated as swap partition. On Intel compatible hardware, the BIOS that boots the system can often only access the first 1024 cylinders of the disk. For this reason people with large disks often create a third partition, just a few MB large, typically mounted on /boot, to store the kernel image and a few auxiliary files needed at boot time, so as to make sure that this stuff is accessible to the BIOS. There may be reasons of security, ease of administration and backup, or testing, to use more than the minimum number of partitions.

fdisk (in the first form of invocation) is a menu driven program for creation and manipulation of partition tables. It understands DOS type partition tables and BSD or SUN type disklabels.
Now, if you have read the above underlined for understanding then what don't you understand? If this is homework you will have to note your references.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fdisk, parted, and gparted lawrence_lee_lee Linux - Software 3 06-15-2008 08:26 AM
Parted & Fdisk Problems whitts Linux - Software 2 05-03-2007 02:14 AM
fdisk/parted/cfdisk: command not found indole Linux - Software 2 02-17-2005 12:08 PM
fdisk, parted questions? darkleaf Linux - Software 2 10-14-2004 04:07 AM
workaround for parted bug using fdisk and resize2fs carneros Linux - Newbie 2 10-05-2004 12:52 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:15 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration