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Old 07-16-2006, 02:29 AM   #1
Free_beer
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FC 5 "Hardware Profiles" & "FAT32"


Do you have Linux and Windows installed on the same machine? What is the best way to access and transfer files between the OSs? That is, how do you make the same filesystems and files accessible when you are running either OS?

There are some considerations to note:

* Linux supports Windows types of partitions (e.g. FAT, FAT32, etc), but
* Windows does not recognize Linux types of partitions (e.g. ext2, ext3, etc)

I recommend creating a separate partition that is accessible to both Windows and Linux. I'll refer to this as a "share" partition. It must be of type FAT32 (same as vfat) or FAT to be accessible and writable by both OSs (NTFS is not yet an option as Linux does not support writing to NTFS partitions). To make the share partition visible and writable by both OSs, do the following:

1. Create a FAT32 partition that you want to be visible by both OSs. I don't explain how to do that here. I believe you can create the FAT32 partition in Windows using Start->Run->Administrative Tools->Computer Management->Disk Management. Many Linux installation programs (e.g. Red Hat) allow you to create FAT32 partitions during the installation process.
2. For Windows, you don't have to do anything to make the FAT32 partition accessible. The OS will automatically detect it and assign it a drive letter (e.g. E
3. For Linux, do the following steps to make the FAT32 partition accessible:
1. Create the directory that serves as the mount point (e.g. mkdir /osshare). The mount point is the location in the filesystem where you want this FAT32 partition to appear.
2. Put an entry in the /etc/fstab file for the share partition. Be very careful in editing this file, as it's used at system startup! For an example, check out the /osshare entry in my /etc/fstab file. The umask option determines the permissions for all filesystems on the partition.
3. Upon your next reboot into Linux, the share partition should get mounted automatically. If you wish to mount the FAT32 partition immediately, use the mount command, e.g.: mount /osshare

Once you've set up your share partition, you can use it for transferring files between the OSs.

Last edited by Free_beer; 07-17-2006 at 12:20 AM.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:39 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
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what's a Hardware Profile?

what have you done to see this new drive? are you just expecting it to magically appear? have you put an entry into /etc/fstab for it or tried using the mount command to access it?
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:40 AM   #3
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by the way is there a certain order i should install my partitions? I was thinking something like this (correct me if im wrong...)

1. Windows XP
2. FC 5
3. Fat32
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:44 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie
what's a Hardware Profile?

what have you done to see this new drive? are you just expecting it to magically appear? have you put an entry into /etc/fstab for it or tried using the mount command to access it?
Hardware profile lets you put your hard drive in other computers. This is good for the hard drive so the computer's chipset will not be a problem when booting up (OS here). Windoze actually has this incorperated as an option and it works.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:46 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie

what have you done to see this new drive? are you just expecting it to magically appear? have you put an entry into /etc/fstab for it or tried using the mount command to access it?
Do i use GEDIT or something to make an entry? Even if thats the case, I wouldn't know what to put....
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:55 AM   #6
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can't see what these hardware profiles would achieve... sounds like a way to get around windows shortcomings...

you'd add an entry to fstab in an editor, saying somethign like
Code:
/dev/hdb1    /mnt/fat32    vfat    defaults   0 0
where hdb1 is the partition in question and /mnt/fat32 is an empty diretory whereyou wish to mount the drive.

as for partitions, fc5 won't have a single partition. at the least i'd suggest a small primary partition, about 100mb to hold /boot and then another single partition to hold an LVM strucutre for other data. shouldn't matter where the paritions are, but for conformity keep /noot as primary and as near the physical start of the disk as posisble.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 02:59 AM   #7
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http://www.geocities.com/i_t_xpert/1212.JPG

About the FAT32, i guessing it would probly be better if I created the Fat32 with Windoze, then make an entry in fstab to mount the FAT32 using: /dev/hdb1 /mnt/fat32 vfat defaults 0 0

right?

Last edited by Free_beer; 07-16-2006 at 03:06 AM.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 03:00 AM   #8
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linux detects chipsets at boot, there is no configuration required for things like that. no 2 dozen reboots or anything.
 
Old 07-16-2006, 03:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie
linux detects chipsets at boot, there is no configuration required for things like that. no 2 dozen reboots or anything.
Awesome, I couldn't tell if that was the case cuz my ATI card had display issues FC 4 right after GRUB loaded. For the record, i had to use text install cuz GUI didn't work so i should've known from the start FC 4 was going to be a pain. Just got FC 5, so no more "boot: linux nofb" hopefully. Thanks for the info. I'll keep you posted, PEACE!!
 
Old 07-16-2006, 07:29 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie
can't see what these hardware profiles would achieve... sounds like a way to get around windows shortcomings...

you'd add an entry to fstab in an editor, saying somethign like
Code:
/dev/hdb1    /mnt/fat32    vfat    defaults   0 0
where hdb1 is the partition in question and /mnt/fat32 is an empty diretory whereyou wish to mount the drive.

as for partitions, fc5 won't have a single partition. at the least i'd suggest a small primary partition, about 100mb to hold /boot and then another single partition to hold an LVM strucutre for other data. shouldn't matter where the paritions are, but for conformity keep /noot as primary and as near the physical start of the disk as posisble.
The code you told me to put in fstab did not work. This is what my fstab looks like:
Code:
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 /                       ext3    defaults        1 1
LABEL=/boot             /boot                   ext3    defaults        1 2
devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0
proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0
sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 swap                    swap    defaults        0 0
/dev/hdb2    /mnt/fat32    vfat    defaults   0 0
Is there n e other way to mount the FAT32 partition. (When I created the FAT32 partition with windows XP, i did not give it a drive letter (C: , H)
 
Old 07-17-2006, 12:18 AM   #11
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Success!!!

So you have Linux and Windows installed on the same machine. What is the best way to access and transfer files between the OSs? That is, how do you make the same filesystems and files accessible when you are running either OS?

There are some considerations to note:

* Linux supports Windows types of partitions (e.g. FAT, FAT32, etc), but
* Windows does not recognize Linux types of partitions (e.g. ext2, ext3, etc)

I recommend creating a separate partition that is accessible to both Windows and Linux. I'll refer to this as a "share" partition. It must be of type FAT32 (same as vfat) or FAT to be accessible and writable by both OSs (NTFS is not yet an option as Linux does not support writing to NTFS partitions). To make the share partition visible and writable by both OSs, do the following:

1. Create a FAT32 partition that you want to be visible by both OSs. I don't explain how to do that here. I believe you can create the FAT32 partition in Windows using Start->Run->Administrative Tools->Computer Management->Disk Management. Many Linux installation programs (e.g. Red Hat) allow you to create FAT32 partitions during the installation process.
2. For Windows, you don't have to do anything to make the FAT32 partition accessible. The OS will automatically detect it and assign it a drive letter (e.g. E
3. For Linux, do the following steps to make the FAT32 partition accessible:
1. Create the directory that serves as the mount point (e.g. mkdir /osshare). The mount point is the location in the filesystem where you want this FAT32 partition to appear.
2. Put an entry in the /etc/fstab file for the share partition. Be very careful in editing this file, as it's used at system startup! For an example, check out the /osshare entry in my /etc/fstab file. The umask option determines the permissions for all filesystems on the partition.
3. Upon your next reboot into Linux, the share partition should get mounted automatically. If you wish to mount the FAT32 partition immediately, use the mount command, e.g.: mount /osshare

Once you've set up your share partition, you can use it for transferring files between the OSs.
 
  


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