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Old 01-12-2012, 05:06 AM   #31
AnanthaP
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Quote:
What will be a good one for me and my 10 year old to use? Looking to start out with a GUI, but also using command line. My child is interested in learning how a computer works, aside from just pointing and clicking.
Do you think the distro is very important in this case?

I think what your child (he/she) really needs first is to go through some simple concepts about computers in general first. Usually this means parts of a computer, connection of computers (networks), server based .v. local storage, hardware, languages - OS, utilities, packages, programmes etc.

I dont know your background or your child's capability (some kids can open a watch and others have been to fall into an oilcan) but you should consider a exposure to a guru.

Its like hanging about cars.

OK.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 06:36 AM   #32
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnanthaP View Post
I think what your child (he/she) really needs first is to go through some simple concepts about computers in general first. Usually this means parts of a computer, connection of computers (networks), server based .v. local storage, hardware, languages - OS, utilities, packages, programmes etc.
IMHO, learning about those things could easily bore/discourage a great majority of children (and adults). Let him/her use a computer first (ideally to do things they like to do) and once/if they like it you can discuss/encourage to learn about the underlying mechanisms (not the other way round).
 
Old 01-12-2012, 06:53 AM   #33
corp769
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
IMHO, learning about those things could easily bore/discourage a great majority of children (and adults). Let him/her use a computer first (ideally to do things they like to do) and once/if they like it you can discuss/encourage to learn about the underlying mechanisms (not the other way round).
I honestly think the same way.... I know if I was a younger kid, and my parents started talking/teaching me about more advanced, complicated things like so, I would be confused, and wouldn't want anything to do with it.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 07:18 AM   #34
playmania
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Family Friendly Linux Version

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Originally Posted by autophil View Post
I started with Ubuntu but I only started to learn how things work when I started to use Slackware. Then I never looked back. I wouldnt exactly call it Family Friendly, but itll teach you a thing or two.
Ubuntu is the best solution for me also! My kid wants also to learn more about computers and web programming and he also likes Ubuntu, although i find it not user friendly.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 07:19 AM   #35
k3lt01
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Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
IMHO, learning about those things could easily bore/discourage a great majority of children (and adults). Let him/her use a computer first (ideally to do things they like to do) and once/if they like it you can discuss/encourage to learn about the underlying mechanisms (not the other way round).
+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by corp769 View Post
I honestly think the same way.... I know if I was a younger kid, and my parents started talking/teaching me about more advanced, complicated things like so, I would be confused, and wouldn't want anything to do with it.
+1

Let the kids get into using the system before they start dissecting and analysing it. Pushing to hard and to soon can easily destroy anyones enthusiasm especially a childs.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 09:22 AM   #36
snowpine
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Originally Posted by k3lt01 View Post
Is there anything else you want?
Respectfully let's not get hung up on a minor detail of 4 Ubuntu releases ago. The bigger question: Is Ubuntu a "Family Friendly Linux Version"? I say the answer is "Yes. (One of many.)"

Let's not give the OP the misconception that Linux culture is all about "my distro is better than your distro" bickering.

Last edited by snowpine; 01-12-2012 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 12:32 PM   #37
k3lt01
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Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Respectfully let's not get hung up on a minor detail of 4 Ubuntu releases ago. The bigger question: Is Ubuntu a "Family Friendly Linux Version"? I say the answer is "Yes. (One of many.)"
No, the bigger question is what the OP stated, is Ubuntu a family friendly Linux version is your thoughts on this. Let's not let our own interpretation of the OPs needs cloud our judgement instead lets give the OP valid comparisons 10.04 is STILL a current LTS release afterall.

You say yes to your question and that is your right I say there are others that are "friendlier" and that is my right. I don't see either of us getting hung up on anything like mine is better than yours, if you do then I can't help that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Let's not give the OP the misconception that Linux culture is all about "my distro is better than your distro" bickering.
Not at all, but it would be better if we gave valid comparisons. I will always have a soft spot for Ubuntu, particularly 7.04 as my real introduction to Linux, but when it is all said and done we all have our different opinion and our own reasons for it. I'm willing to share mine and willing to discuss others and considering the OP asked a question about opinions I would hope we could give him information he can base his final choice on.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 12:50 PM   #38
snowpine
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Originally Posted by k3lt01 View Post
when it is all said and done we all have our different opinion and our own reasons for it. I'm willing to share mine and willing to discuss others and considering the OP asked a question about opinions I would hope we could give him information he can base his final choice on.
Your opinion is valuable, and if you write a negative review of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, that's OK with me. (I'm not an Ubuntu user myself so I have no interest in defending the distro; I prefer Debian same as you, so I think we're basically on the same page. )

But you didn't give your opinion, you misrepresented someone else's opinion in an inaccurate/disrespectful way. You said:

Quote:
from a flawed idea that users are idiots and should only update what the Mint Developers think is acceptable. Problem is by Mint's updating definition people should still be on kernel 2.6.32 (the Ubuntu variation in 10.04) which we now know has some pretty big security holes and Ubuntu has recommended updating to the newer 3.0.1 kernel.
Clem Lefebvre (developer of Mint) and Mark Shuttleworth (supreme overlord of Ubuntu) are not shy about expressing their ideas and opinions publicly. If there is a particular statement or blog posting by these people that you'd like to discuss (such as where they call their users "idiots"), give us a link so we can read it too, then maybe we will not have the misunderstanding.

Last edited by snowpine; 01-12-2012 at 12:53 PM.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 01:29 PM   #39
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Your opinion is valuable, and if you write a negative review of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, that's OK with me. (I'm not an Ubuntu user myself so I have no interest in defending the distro; I prefer Debian same as you, so I think we're basically on the same page. )
No we aren't and your next paragraph shows this to be true

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
But you didn't give your opinion, you misrepresented someone else's opinion in an inaccurate/disrespectful way. You said:
I know what I said and in saying what I said I gave MY opinion, I cannot see why you have difficulty with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Clem Lefebvre (developer of Mint) and Mark Shuttleworth (supreme overlord of Ubuntu) are not shy about expressing their ideas and opinions publicly. If there is a particular statement or blog posting by these people that you'd like to discuss (such as where they call their users "idiots"), give us a link so we can read it too, then maybe we will not have the misunderstanding.
So you want me to link back to my post, that would be a waste of time wouldn't it? Take very careful note of the highlighted section and take this next statement in carefully. I am not shy about expressing my opinions either. I gave my opinion just like you gave yours, I haven't said I quoted anyone but you think I did. The problem now is your interpretation of my post.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 07:33 PM   #40
jbrew
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What we use the computer for basically right now is only going on the 'net and playing some games we downloaded. I have done patches to fix some problems w/Vista, nothing too involved though. I want to learn more and then teach my son. My wife has no desire to learn or change, so the big thing is making it simple for her. My ideal would be to install a basic distro that would get us up running and online, and from there we add bits and pieces that we need to do more than play online.
 
Old 01-12-2012, 07:50 PM   #41
sycamorex
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Originally Posted by jbrew View Post
My ideal would be to install a basic distro that would get us up running and online, and from there we add bits and pieces that we need to do more than play online.
I think any distro that has been mentioned here should do (Ubuntu, Mint, etc.). Try LiveCDs of those distros and you'll see which one works better for you / you like most.

The guys mentioned Debian as well. I'd prefer it over Ubuntu or Mint. The problem is that it doesn't ship with a lot of proprietary stuff and it might be difficult / time consuming for a linux newbie to install it manually.


As we can see from previous posts, this thread may continue indefinitely without any conclusive answers. IMHO, the best thing for you is take those live CDs and try it for yourself. Please note that Live CDs /DVDs do NOT install anything on your hard drive. They load into a computer's memory so you can safely try them and once you've decided which one is most suitable for you, you can install it.

have fun
 
Old 01-12-2012, 08:09 PM   #42
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbrew View Post
What we use the computer for basically right now is only going on the 'net and playing some games we downloaded
The amount of games available for Linux is small compared to Windows. Are you able to have a spare PC to install Linux onto so you can try it out?
 
  


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