LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 07-16-2010, 03:35 PM   #1
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Rep: Reputation: 16
External Netbook monitor on Ubuntu 10.04


First off let me just say, after only having linux for a total of like 3 hours. i must say i think i love it more than microsoft itself. its so simple to use! but onto the problem, i have ubuntu on my acer aspire one netbook. and i cant for the life of me figure out how to set up a monitor on linux, i did it earlier but not to the way i wanted. is there not a way too only use the monitor and the laptop screen will go blank?
 
Old 07-16-2010, 03:54 PM   #2
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Philly, PA
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, RHEL, Fedora Core, FreeBSD, Windows x64
Posts: 1,431
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
Try running this command in the terminal...
Code:
setpci -s 00:02.1 f4.b=00
To turn the netbooks monitor back on just adjust the brightness controls.

You can turn that into a keyboard shortcut as well (which is what I did on my netbook).

Last edited by sag47; 07-16-2010 at 04:11 PM.
 
Old 07-16-2010, 03:56 PM   #3
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
Run this command in the terminal...
Code:
setpci -s 00:02.1 f4.b=00
To turn the netbooks monitor back on just adjust the brightness controls.

You can turn that into a keyboard shortcut as well (which is what I did on my netbook).
let me make sure i got this right before i do this, too get the netbook screen too come back on i just turn my brightness up or down?
 
Old 07-16-2010, 04:00 PM   #4
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxishard View Post
let me make sure i got this right before i do this, too get the netbook screen too come back on i just turn my brightness up or down?
i don't know what happened but this popped up


drew@drew-laptop:~$ setpci -s 00:02.1 f4.b=00
pcilib: Cannot open /sys/bus/pci/devices/0000:00:02.1/config
 
Old 07-16-2010, 04:16 PM   #5
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Philly, PA
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, RHEL, Fedora Core, FreeBSD, Windows x64
Posts: 1,431
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
Code:
ls -lah /sys/bus/pci/devices/
Your monitor is on one of those buses. Mine is on the 0000:00:02.1 bus.
 
Old 07-16-2010, 04:26 PM   #6
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
Code:
ls -lah /sys/bus/pci/devices/
Your monitor is on one of those buses. Mine is on the 0000:00:02.1 bus.
mine is not on any single bus, i don't understand why it won't show up anymore.
 
Old 07-17-2010, 12:55 AM   #7
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Philly, PA
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, RHEL, Fedora Core, FreeBSD, Windows x64
Posts: 1,431
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
I just realized you ran it as a regular user (drew@drew-laptop:~$). You must run the command as root by either running the sudo command or su command.

Here's two ways to login or emulate the root login.

su
sudo bash

Then run that command as root.
 
Old 07-17-2010, 11:59 AM   #8
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
I just realized you ran it as a regular user (drew@drew-laptop:~$). You must run the command as root by either running the sudo command or su command.

Here's two ways to login or emulate the root login.

su
sudo bash

Then run that command as root.
i ran it as root,



total 0
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 .
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 ..
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:00.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:00.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:02.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:02.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:02.1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:02.1
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1b.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1b.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1c.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1c.1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1c.2 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1c.3 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.3
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1d.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1d.1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.1
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1d.2 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1d.3 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.3
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1d.7 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.7
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1e.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1e.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1f.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1f.2 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:00:1f.3 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.3
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:01:00.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.0/0000:01:00.0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2010-07-17 11:43 0000:03:00.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.2/0000:03:00.0

then this popped up
 
Old 07-17-2010, 02:02 PM   #9
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Philly, PA
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, RHEL, Fedora Core, FreeBSD, Windows x64
Posts: 1,431
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
Each of those is a link to a folder (for all of my commands I'm running them as root).

Before you try anything try running this command as root user.
Code:
setpci -s 00:02.1 f4.b=00
If that doesn't work then got to your bus folders...
Code:
cd /sys/bus/pci/devices/
Example lets go into the 0000:00:02.1 folder and display what class the PCI device is.
Code:
cd 0000\:00\:02.1
ls -lah #list the files and folders
cat class
According to this article:
http://wiki.osdev.org/Talk:VGA_Hardware#Detection_2

If your device class code starts with 0x03... then it is a VGA-compatible device (your screen). Mine is 0x038000 so my screen is classified as "Other display controller" according to that article.

You must go into each of those folders and cat the class file until you find your 0x03 device. Then when you find that device let me know where it is and I'll formulate a new command for you.

If my original command works for you (setpci -s 00:02.1...) then I'll continue to help you by assisting you in setting up a handy shortcut in which you can easily turn off your monitor with a shortcut key. I have mine set up as [WindowsKey]+o (o for off).

Last edited by sag47; 07-17-2010 at 02:28 PM.
 
Old 07-17-2010, 03:28 PM   #10
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
Each of those is a link to a folder (for all of my commands I'm running them as root).

Before you try anything try running this command as root user.
Code:
setpci -s 00:02.1 f4.b=00
If that doesn't work then got to your bus folders...
Code:
cd /sys/bus/pci/devices/
Example lets go into the 0000:00:02.1 folder and display what class the PCI device is.
Code:
cd 0000\:00\:02.1
ls -lah #list the files and folders
cat class
According to this article:
http://wiki.osdev.org/Talk:VGA_Hardware#Detection_2

If your device class code starts with 0x03... then it is a VGA-compatible device (your screen). Mine is 0x038000 so my screen is classified as "Other display controller" according to that article.

You must go into each of those folders and cat the class file until you find your 0x03 device. Then when you find that device let me know where it is and I'll formulate a new command for you.

If my original command works for you (setpci -s 00:02.1...) then I'll continue to help you by assisting you in setting up a handy shortcut in which you can easily turn off your monitor with a shortcut key. I have mine set up as [WindowsKey]+o (o for off).
ok heres the cool part, i understand everything you just said! heres the bad part, i cant seem too access the folders. i got a bunch of "no such files", or """" is a directory" and then i looked harder and found this

cannot access .gvfs: Permission denied

and this

cd: 0000:00:02.1: No such file or directory

Last edited by linuxishard; 07-17-2010 at 03:30 PM.
 
Old 07-17-2010, 05:10 PM   #11
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Nevermind, i figured out i just had too turn off my netbook screen in monitors tab, but thanks for your help i learned a lot, btw. how do i shut off root?
 
Old 07-18-2010, 12:27 AM   #12
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Philly, PA
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, RHEL, Fedora Core, FreeBSD, Windows x64
Posts: 1,431
Blog Entries: 33

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
You get out of the root login by typing
Code:
exit
Did you remember to escape the colon (: ) characters? You escape characters in the shell with a preceding backslash (\). The shell interprets certain characters for regular expression patterns. For example if you go to your home directory and create a folder..
Code:
mkdir duckling
Now if you list the contents of your home directory filtering the command like so with a wildcard (*)...
Code:
ls -lah D*
Then then all of your folders starting with a capital D will show up such as Documents and Desktop. However since duckling starts with a lower case d then it does not show up. Now lets list all files and folders which start with either an upper case D or a lower case d.
Code:
ls -lah [Dd]*
You notice that your duckling folder shows up now. Square brackets ([]) and the asterisk (*) are both examples of characters which are interpreted by the shell. So if you have a file named [myfile].txt then you will have to list it by escaping the square brackets because you don't want the shell to interpret it. You literally just want the filename. You would do that like so...
Code:
ls -lah \[myfile\].txt
That's what I did to go into my folder to cat the class file to show its contents...
Code:
cd 0000\:00\:02.1
On another note you can autocomplete folder names by pushing the tab key on your keyboard.
So if you go to the folder /sys/bus/pci/devices/ and type
Code:
cd 0
Then press the tab key it will autocomplete the filename as far as it can and then stop when there are files that start with a 0 but deviate to different letters after that.

You should now see the following after pushing tab.
Code:
cd 0000\:0
Now push tab twice and you'll see all of the files that start with that name. If you type the next character to hint which filename you wish to select and push tab again then the shell will autocomplete as far as it can until it reaches more files whose names deviate.
Code:
cd 0000\:03
Push tab key to autocomplete. Then push the tab key twice to see your options. If you don't have any more options and your filename is complete then push enter to enter the folder.
Code:
cd 0000\:03\:00.0
By autocompleting with the tab key you'll find you'll get much faster at navigating your computers files through the command line then you ever could using the GUI. All you have to do is to learn the commands of Linux and how to formulate them. Trust me, once you learn this your Linux life will be much easier.

Using resources such as the LQ wiki will help you learn the Linux way.

I have also written a small guide to Linux as user sagteck which is kind of just a bunch of tutorials I farted out of my head if you want to check that out as well. I did that to teach some people at another forum I frequent.

Learn about Linux

It has a downloadable offline PDF version in case you want to read it on the road or something. I referred you to that guide in case you like my teaching/writing style.

I also highly recommend you purchase a book such as one from the Linux Bible series (Did an amazon search for linux bible). That's where I learned a lot of my command line nuances in the GNU/Linux terminal.

I hope you don't get discouraged away from Linux and hope you find it as enjoyable as I do! Good luck and if there's anything I write about you don't understand just ask me and I'll elaborate for you.

Last edited by sag47; 07-18-2010 at 12:41 AM.
 
Old 07-18-2010, 12:12 PM   #13
linuxishard
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
You get out of the root login by typing
Code:
exit
Did you remember to escape the colon (: ) characters? You escape characters in the shell with a preceding backslash (\). The shell interprets certain characters for regular expression patterns. For example if you go to your home directory and create a folder..
Code:
mkdir duckling
Now if you list the contents of your home directory filtering the command like so with a wildcard (*)...
Code:
ls -lah D*
Then then all of your folders starting with a capital D will show up such as Documents and Desktop. However since duckling starts with a lower case d then it does not show up. Now lets list all files and folders which start with either an upper case D or a lower case d.
Code:
ls -lah [Dd]*
You notice that your duckling folder shows up now. Square brackets ([]) and the asterisk (*) are both examples of characters which are interpreted by the shell. So if you have a file named [myfile].txt then you will have to list it by escaping the square brackets because you don't want the shell to interpret it. You literally just want the filename. You would do that like so...
Code:
ls -lah \[myfile\].txt
That's what I did to go into my folder to cat the class file to show its contents...
Code:
cd 0000\:00\:02.1
On another note you can autocomplete folder names by pushing the tab key on your keyboard.
So if you go to the folder /sys/bus/pci/devices/ and type
Code:
cd 0
Then press the tab key it will autocomplete the filename as far as it can and then stop when there are files that start with a 0 but deviate to different letters after that.

You should now see the following after pushing tab.
Code:
cd 0000\:0
Now push tab twice and you'll see all of the files that start with that name. If you type the next character to hint which filename you wish to select and push tab again then the shell will autocomplete as far as it can until it reaches more files whose names deviate.
Code:
cd 0000\:03
Push tab key to autocomplete. Then push the tab key twice to see your options. If you don't have any more options and your filename is complete then push enter to enter the folder.
Code:
cd 0000\:03\:00.0
By autocompleting with the tab key you'll find you'll get much faster at navigating your computers files through the command line then you ever could using the GUI. All you have to do is to learn the commands of Linux and how to formulate them. Trust me, once you learn this your Linux life will be much easier.

Using resources such as the LQ wiki will help you learn the Linux way.

I have also written a small guide to Linux as user sagteck which is kind of just a bunch of tutorials I farted out of my head if you want to check that out as well. I did that to teach some people at another forum I frequent.

Learn about Linux

It has a downloadable offline PDF version in case you want to read it on the road or something. I referred you to that guide in case you like my teaching/writing style.

I also highly recommend you purchase a book such as one from the Linux Bible series (Did an amazon search for linux bible). That's where I learned a lot of my command line nuances in the GNU/Linux terminal.

I hope you don't get discouraged away from Linux and hope you find it as enjoyable as I do! Good luck and if there's anything I write about you don't understand just ask me and I'll elaborate for you.
thanks you just taught me a load of stuff and it was very simple.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
MSI netbook Wind L1350 SD card reader with Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.04 Cody Morgan Linux - Laptop and Netbook 0 06-15-2010 06:21 PM
[SOLVED] External Monitor for an Acer Aspire One Netbook gfmartin05 Linux - Hardware 6 01-21-2010 07:19 PM
instaling ubuntu on a laptop using an external monitor peterpetruch Linux - Newbie 1 12-12-2008 10:14 AM
Can't set to 1280x1024 on Ubuntu with ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 and external monitor haraldsf Linux - Desktop 3 08-25-2007 03:32 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:24 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration