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-   -   EXT4, 3, 2, and / will not install on 16GB USB stick for Ubuntu FULL install (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/ext4-3-2-and-will-not-install-on-16gb-usb-stick-for-ubuntu-full-install-817967/)

drillerchicago 07-04-2010 11:36 AM

EXT4, 3, 2, and / will not install on 16GB USB stick for Ubuntu FULL install
 
Hi, new to linux.

I'm trying to have a full version of Ubuntu (Lucid Lynx) installed on a 16GB USB pen drive. Not a live USB with persistence. Someone had told me that this is the only way to be able to have a upgradeable Ubuntu (through upgrade manager) and a device to boot up other computers and transfer files.

My goal was (told to me by someone who knew more Linux) to partition the stcik into 4 partitions:

1- 7GB Fat32 in the beginning so I can have it recognized by Windows and use it in Windows environment

2- 4GB EXT4 to house / and the OS

3- 4GB EXT2 to house /home

4- 1GB Swap

I have used Gparted, fdisk, and the Live CD's installation program (advanced option) to partition and format these drives but when it goes to install / on EXT4 it gets stuck. I gave up all above and tried to get it installed on the whole 16GB, still the same. Gets stuck when it gets to installing / on EXT4. I even tried EXT3 and EXT2 for the whole USB but the same error message. Very frustrating. Is this even possible? Can it be the pendrive? (bought it cheap from Ebay/China $15 for 16GB!)

I was able to, after lots of tinkering, to create a Live USB with persistence but that can not be upgraded through the update manager (or I didn't know how). Any help would be appreciated.

TIA

drillerchicago 07-04-2010 01:57 PM

58 views and not one suggestion? Anyone?

Jack Acid 07-04-2010 03:16 PM

Might be using the wrong file system on the stick. / as ro , mount the other dirs as rw

remmilou 07-04-2010 03:17 PM

Advice
 
Based on my ***personal*** experience I would advice you to create an ext2 for / (including home) and a FAT 32 for data exchange.
ext3 and ext4 ar journalling, which is not goor for you pen drive (to many writes)
Not installing swap partition will limit the use to systems with enough RAM, but swap might be toooooo slow on a pen drive.
Do "dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdx bs=512 count=1" (without the quotes) and than give gparted a new try.

Remco

drillerchicago 07-04-2010 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jack Acid (Post 4023699)
Might be using the wrong file system on the stick. / as ro , mount the other dirs as rw

sorry I'm newbie and don't know what that means.

drillerchicago 07-04-2010 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by remmilou (Post 4023702)
Based on my ***personal*** experience I would advice you to create an ext2 for / (including home) and a FAT 32 for data exchange.
ext3 and ext4 ar journalling, which is not goor for you pen drive (to many writes)
Not installing swap partition will limit the use to systems with enough RAM, but swap might be toooooo slow on a pen drive.
Do "dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdx bs=512 count=1" (without the quotes) and than give gparted a new try.

Remco

to be honest I gave up the partitioning. I want to install a full copy on a USB stick and I can't. I tried all 3 versions of 10.04, 9.04 and 8.04.4. All of them gets stuck when it gets to installing the EXT file system. I chose the automated and advanced option when it gets to that point from the live CD.

saikee 07-04-2010 05:15 PM

The whole idea of not installing a Linux in a pen drive is that it takes too long. So long that one thinks it gets stuck and does not have the patience to see it through. It is so ridiculously slow that it should be immediately apparent that is going to be a bad idea because after the installation the boot up speed is going to be a test of patience too.

Distross that have been successful with putting themselves into a pen drive are those with small footprint and always work as a Live CD or Frugal install (same size as the CD). Puppy is great with 100Mb size but a fully installed Ubuntu can be 3.5Gb.

drillerchicago 07-06-2010 01:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by saikee (Post 4023770)
The whole idea of not installing a Linux in a pen drive is that it takes too long. So long that one thinks it gets stuck and does not have the patience to see it through. It is so ridiculously slow that it should be immediately apparent that is going to be a bad idea because after the installation the boot up speed is going to be a test of patience too.

Distross that have been successful with putting themselves into a pen drive are those with small footprint and always work as a Live CD or Frugal install (same size as the CD). Puppy is great with 100Mb size but a fully installed Ubuntu can be 3.5Gb.


Thanks for the suggestion. I gave up on Ubuntu and used Puppy for this. Here is what I posted on another forum of how I did it in case someone else is trying to do the same:
--------------------------------------------
Solved, sort of: I'll post here in case another newbie is trying to do the same. Do at your own risk, I'm a newbie.

I bought this cheap ($15) 16GB USB pendrive off of Ebay and thought it would be cool to have Ubuntu installed on it so I can boot other computers; but still be able to use most of the drive to transfer files between Linux and Windows environment.

Ubuntu gave me a lot of problems partitioning the drive as discussed in this thread. Then someone on another forum suggested that Ubuntu is not even a good candidate for this due to it's extensive footprint and to use Puppy Linux. The latest version 5.0.1 "is built from Ubuntu Lucid Lynx binary packages" so I thought it may be the best of both worlds.

Here is what I did:
1- Downloaded the Puppy iso and burned on CD as an image (not data disc)
2- Disconnected the hard drive on the laptop and booted from the CD
3- do not plug the drive in yet
4- pick the keyboard, language and time zone
5- Pick resolution, I picked 1280x800 for my 14 inch Dell 620 and chose what was suggested
6- Once the OS is up plug in the drive
7- go to menu/system/gParted
8-unmount the USB drive and delete all the partitions
9-click apply (top green check mark)
10- right click on the drive and click new
11-leave everything as is except the file system, change that to FAT32
12- Click Add and Apply
13- When done, right click on the drive and click manage flags and check boot for it
14- close Gparted
15- now got to menu/setup/puppy universal installer
16- click OK to the defaults for a few windows
17- when the window for installation comes up, click on the button at the top to install puppy on the sdx1. It gives you the option to start gParted in the lower section and partition the drive but you have already done it.
18- click OK to default chosen options and pick the CD to find the files
19- once done the CD pops out, take it out
20- now go to menu and shut down
21- before the computer shuts down it asks you to save to file
22- chose it, I think this is the persistent option to save your changes in that session (not sure but makes sense)
23- click OK again to defaults
24- I chose EXT2 when given the option for the file
25- I also gave it a name when asked so I could locate the file easily
26- I also used heavy encryption and chose a password in case I lose the USB drive
27- also used the maximum that was given (1.25GB) for the file, I read somewhere not to exceed 1.8GB (later you have an option from one of the menu items to increase the size)
28- Now press SAVE/ENTER only once. I did it twice by accident and it would not boot. I had to start all over again. It does take a while so be patient and don't press any buttons.
29- Once it's done, the computer shuts down.

That's it. I can boot from the USB and save my session with security. I can also plug the drive into a Windows Machine or Linux box (Ubuntu) and use the flash drive to transfer files. I created some folders so they would be separate from Puppy files. It's pretty fast loading up. Love it.

Jack Acid 07-06-2010 08:03 PM

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/UMSDOS-HOWTO.html

Just thought that was funny. I've used it on a machine with win3.11, win95, and Slackware 2.. or something like that. You even had the option to boot from a floppy tape drive and install from it, or just the good ole boor and root disk images either umsdos or bare.i, 25 diskette including xwin. Ah... the good ole days weren't always good and tomorrow aint as bad as it seems. :)


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