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Old 09-15-2012, 04:51 PM   #1
unixor
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dual winxp ubuntu


hello!

I want to install ubuntu 10.10 in my winxp machine and dual boot

the problem is that wubi seems not to offer an option to install my ubuntu 10.10 iso, and it only installs the one that it downloads from the server (which is the latest 12.04)

any hint for an easy wubi-like installation of 10.10?

thanks!
 
Old 09-15-2012, 08:31 PM   #2
frankbell
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If you want to set up true dual boot, you will need to install from CD or other installation media. To use Wubi, the disk must be mounted; to resize a partition and install to it clean, the disk must be unmounted.

Here is Ubuntu's instructions on how to do that:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot

Wubi is not a Live CD and does not offer a way of installing Ubuntu in a true dual boot configuration. Wubi isn't really intended for long-term usage, more for a taste of Ubuntu for the "Linux curious." However, I did use Xubuntu wubi for over a year (I selected 30 GB disk space at time of install), including a successful online upgrade to 12.04, before setting up true dual boot (Mint with MATE) on that computer.

You can find v. 10.10 here: http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/

Last edited by frankbell; 09-15-2012 at 08:35 PM.
 
Old 09-16-2012, 05:06 AM   #3
cascade9
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10.10 is end of life, out of support since april 2012-

http://fridge.ubuntu.com/2012/04/10/...april-10-2012/

Its not a good idea to use an out of support OS.
 
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Old 09-16-2012, 08:59 AM   #4
Fred Caro
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Dual booting with win,
I looked at the ubuntu links but if I was dual-booting I would have a few questions:

1. where do I put the bootloader, does it need to be on a separate primary partition or will it go on the Windows shrunk down partition
2. most recent installable cd's install linux on a lvm arrangement so how does this relate to deciding where you put the booting arrangements.

Fred.
 
Old 09-16-2012, 07:39 PM   #5
frankbell
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Note that I am not a dual boot expert--I usually single-boot and let the install CD put the boot loader where it wants to.

Normally I think Grub is placed on the MBR for dual booting with Windows, at least for stage 1; stage 2 may be on a small separate boot partition. I normally install LILO to the MBR, except the one time I dual booted Slackware and Fedora.

Wikipedia has a brief but very to the point discussion of this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_GRUB#Installation

And here's another take: http://www.uruk.org/orig-grub/install.html

The Arch wiki, always a great reference, address GRUB and LVM:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...h_Linux_on_LVM

Last edited by frankbell; 09-16-2012 at 07:48 PM.
 
Old 09-16-2012, 07:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Caro View Post
Dual booting with win,
I looked at the ubuntu links but if I was dual-booting I would have a few questions:

1. where do I put the bootloader, does it need to be on a separate primary partition or will it go on the Windows shrunk down partition
2. most recent installable cd's install linux on a lvm arrangement so how does this relate to deciding where you put the booting arrangements.

Fred.
1. If (for example) Windows is on /dev/sda1 and Ubuntu / partition is on /dev/sda2, then you would install GRUB to /dev/sda

2. An LVM is not required for Ubuntu. Should you choose to create one then you must create a separate /boot partition.

That's just a summary. The installer will present you with sane default options. All of this is very well documented here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation
 
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Old 09-17-2012, 03:21 PM   #7
Fred Caro
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Thanks for the reading material. I am trawling through it.
Snowpine, which sda were you recommending puting grub on in respect of dual booting with Windows? If it on sda1 will it not interfere with windows files?
For multipule Linux systems it seems safer to have a separate boot partition that can be updated. If you have an extended partition with logical partitions how are the different os's on the list of different partitions going to link to each other, or can they share /home?

Fred.
 
Old 09-17-2012, 03:29 PM   #8
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Caro View Post
Thanks for the reading material. I am trawling through it.
Snowpine, which sda were you recommending puting grub on in respect of dual booting with Windows? If it on sda1 will it not interfere with windows files?
For multipule Linux systems it seems safer to have a separate boot partition that can be updated. If you have an extended partition with logical partitions how are the different os's on the list of different partitions going to link to each other, or can they share /home?

Fred.
Hi Fred,

1. No, I said /dev/sda *not* /dev/sda1 !

2. Some users choose a separate /boot partition, it depends on the specifics.

3. When you have multiple distributions, whichever one you installed most recently will be "in charge" of GRUB and (hopefully if all goes well) automagically detect the other Linux and Windows partitions.

4. Sure, you can share a /home partition between multiple distros, just make sure to use a separate username for each.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 04:41 PM   #9
unixor
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where can I find a documentation of all these "chinese" stuff like /dev/sda /usr /bin etc?

and, really, why do linux developers use all that uncomprehensible names? I mean, come on, name it the way one can understand from the name, what it is, isnt this the purpose of naming after all???
 
Old 09-26-2012, 04:51 PM   #10
snowpine
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There is no "secret knowledge" in Linux. If you are sincere about learning, then you simply read the freely-available documentation, it is all there for you on ubuntu.com:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Li...emTreeOverview

To answer your second question, there are historical reasons why certain things are named certain ways. It is easier to call something the same name that Linux users have been using for a long time (like /usr or /bin) than to change the name to /squirrel or /broccoli and then everyone needs to unlearn the old name and learn a new name.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 04:51 PM   #11
Habitual
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unixor View Post
where can I find a documentation of all these "chinese" stuff like /dev/sda /usr /bin etc?
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition/devices.html#names
 
Old 09-26-2012, 05:08 PM   #12
JaseP
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Unixor,...

Everything in Linux is a file as far as the OS is concerned.

/ designates the root mount point
/home is the partition (or subdirectory) where user data is stored
/usr is where useful programs that are used by users are stored
/bin is where certain executables are stored
/dev is a "virtual" location that provides naming for devices (/dev/video0 would be the first video capture device for example)
/proc another "virtual space used by the system
/opt where "optional" programs are installed (usually things like libreoffice, google earth and games)
/etc is where important setup files are stored
/var another one of those "virtual" spaces
/root is the "home" directory for the root account
/mnt is where "external" drives are mounted
/media is where removeable storage is mounted

Udev is the sub-system for creating useable device namings in the system. It creates the device entries in /dev. For hard drives, they are typically defined as something like /dev/sda for the first drive, with partitions getting numerical identifiers,... like '/dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, etc.

More than typically, you will only be dealing with the following:
/dev for drives, cameras, USB ports, etc.
/usr/(sub-directories) for dealing with programs and their files
/etc for dealing with settings files (e.g.: /etc/X11/xorg.config for the X-windows configuration file, if your system still uses one)
/media for dealing with flash drives, DVDs, etc.
/home for using your own user account (a sub-directory of /home).

There you have it,... in a nutshell...

Last edited by JaseP; 09-26-2012 at 05:10 PM.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 08:16 PM   #13
frankbell
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/dev/sda would refer to the disk itself. The second physical disk, if present, would be /dev/sdb and so on. (IDE drives used to be /dev/hda, /dev/hdb, that is device hard drive a, device hard drive b, etc., but that terminology has been mostly discarded, though you may see it from time to time). /dev/sda can be translated into device sata drive a, etc.) That is not a Linux purist translation, but it's a good memory hook.

/dev/sda1 is the first partition on drive 1; /deb/sda2 is the second partition on drive one, etc.

DOS confused things by referring to physical drives and partitions with the same terminology. Windows, being primarily derived from DOS, continued this misleading practice.

Last edited by frankbell; 09-26-2012 at 08:19 PM.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 04:38 PM   #14
Fred Caro
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Snowpine said, regarding where to put the bootloader on a win/linux dual boot system:

>1. No, I said /dev/sda *not* /dev/sda1 !

I am not sure where 'sda' is; how would fdisk report the first partition on a drive, if not sda1 or hda1?

If this is a grub/legacy thing, where the first partition is reported as 0, surely this would not matter on grub2 installations as both are reported as '1'?

Fred.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 05:52 PM   #15
JaseP
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Fred,

As an example, a udev naming for the main hard drive (whole thing) is something like;
/dev/sda


That is further broken down into partitions, which would get namings like;
/dev/sda1 --> the first Partition (in most instances this is the booting partition)
/dev/sda2 --> the second Partition (Very likely a "logical" or "Extended" partition which is further broken down).

and so on...

You could have a;
/dev/sda3 which is mounted as a /home partition, but is a sub-set of /dev/hda2
&
/dev/sda4 which might be a swap partition, also as a sub-set of /dev/hda2

To complicate matters, you have two major partitioning "types," MBR (the older one, partitions limited to no more than 4TB), and the newer GPT (which permits larger partitions).

Additionally, you can have hybrid MBR/GPT partitioning, in which you have to be careful not to corrupt one or both...

You have to use the correct version of fdisk for the partitioning type...

And fdisk would interpret sda as the first drive,... and sda1, etc. as partitions.

Follow?!?!
 
  


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