LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-14-2010, 10:18 AM   #16
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1

Hi johnsfire

I just realized that after my screen went crazy I did not try to reboot, duh!

I am back into a fully functioning GUI, not sure what caused it to go nuts but I am good again. I am in synaptic and there are several versions of nvidia-glx, 96, 173, 180, 185. Could you suggest a version I should try?

Thanks again for alll you time!
 
Old 06-14-2010, 01:35 PM   #17
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
Pleased to hear your nvidia card is working after all.

Quote:
there are several versions of nvidia ... Could you suggest a version I should try?
I'd like to, by consulting http://www.nvidia.com ... Download drivers, but the site isn't working at the moment - "Sorry. Please try later".
You can search that site for the right driver for your card. If it's an "old" card then there's a link on their site for "Legacy drivers" [They work fine, but probably aren't developed any further].

Remember that it is essential to blacklist the nouveau module if the nvidia module is what you'd like to use. Otherwise nouveau is loaded by ununtu, and nvidia will not work because nouveau has control of your nvidia hardware, and won't let go of it.

To do this, edit (as root) the file /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf and add the following two lines somewhere near the start of the file (not that this matters, but it's easier to find the line if you want to undo the change later).

Code:
# Blacklist the nouveau module so the nvidia one can be used instead
blacklist nouveau
When things are not going smoothly, I try to keep things as simple as possible: So I would recommend that you disable the on-board video (in the BIOS setup) when you are trying to get the nvidia card working. Later, if you want multiple monitors, you could try re-enabling it. Try to stick to the KISS principle.

Off topic: Please don't get angry, and don't give up.
See this as a puzzle - it is solvable, and you get a nice feeling when you have made it all work.

You seem to be making good progress
 
Old 06-14-2010, 01:42 PM   #18
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalfMadDad View Post
I am back into a fully functioning GUI
Make a backup copy of xorg.conf and Xorg.0.log now that you have a functioning GUI. They may be needed later for comparison if you have problems, because of (or even independent of) some attempt to make the GUI even better.

What does "full functioning" mean?

More important, what do you want improved from the current state? Just enabling a second monitor? Or increasing resolution? Or what?

The xorg.conf and Xorg.0.log files are also the places to look in order to make an informed nonrandom step toward whatever improvement you want.
 
Old 06-14-2010, 03:10 PM   #19
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Hi tredegar, hi johnsfire

When I say fully functional I mean I have one good monitor at a good resolution, not a black screen or 600x480px.

I am scared of the Nvidia drivers from their site, this did not go well yesterday. Could I enable one of the Nvidia packages in synaptic and blacklist the nouveau module?

Ubuntu has changed their set up and they don't generate a xorg.conf file automatically now. I can generate one by taking gnome down and doing the Xorg -configure command. Should I do this?

Thanks
 
Old 06-14-2010, 03:26 PM   #20
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalfMadDad View Post
I am scared of the Nvidia drivers from their site
I also avoid those when possible.

Quote:
Could I enable one of the Nvidia packages in synaptic and blacklist the nouveau module?
You mean it is somewhat working now using the nouveau driver?

Quote:
Ubuntu has changed their set up and they don't generate a xorg.conf file automatically now.
Sorry about the misinformation. I was noticing that same thing myself. I'm not sure what, if anything, is used in place of display part of xorg.conf for newer versions of Linux that don't seem to use that.

There are a few files in /usr/lib/X11/xorg.conf.d that seem to have replaced the input aspects of xorg.conf. But I don't know what replaces the display aspects.

Still /var/log/Xorg.0.log ought to be there and ought to give useful info. If things are working at all, I'd look there for details before changing anything.

Quote:
Could I enable one of the Nvidia packages in synaptic and blacklist the nouveau module?
That may be the way forward. You're convincing me this stuff is harder than it was in earlier versions. How to know which nvidia package to choose? How exactly to install/enable it? How to undo it if it goes wrong?
 
Old 06-14-2010, 03:52 PM   #21
frieza
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: harvard, il
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.4,DD-WRT micro plus ssh,lfs-6.6,Fedora 15,Fedora 16
Posts: 3,200

Rep: Reputation: 397Reputation: 397Reputation: 397Reputation: 397
I would recommend an nvidia card, I use an Ubuntu distribution with the nvidia proprietary drivers from the restricted repository

I used to have a fedora box with dual head with two video cards (an ATi and a matrox, one agp, one pci, now THAT was 'fun' to configure but wasn't actually near as painful as I expected it to be surprisingly, however modern dual head cards have made multi video cards for dual head all but irrelevant nowadays);
point being dual head is nowhere near as hard as it initially seems

then again with ATI cards I've had nothing but problems getting them to do what I wanted with Linux (e.g. a dell laptop I had with an s-video out, the s-video out was useless since the ATI proprietary drivers didn't support the model of video card my laptop had, and configuring (gatos?) isn't stragihtforward and I dont' even know if gatos suported my card, but the Nvidia cards i had almost always worked properly (except one i had that was damaged)

Last edited by frieza; 06-14-2010 at 03:59 PM.
 
Old 06-14-2010, 06:32 PM   #22
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Hi Guys

I am back and still stuck.

I blacklisted nouveau

I enabled each nvidia-glx package one by one, each time switch video to auto and each time I had severe kernel warnings and things ground to a halt. I went into the restricted hardware menu and the most current version was already activated, assumingly from my time in synaptic.

Surely I am close to screwed now, no? Whichever ever way it turns out Simon, tredegar, frieza and especially johnsfine, you've all put in time with this and it is really appreciated. It is a shame this medium is so faceless and distant, I wish I could shake your hands
 
Old 06-15-2010, 05:42 AM   #23
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
You seem to be in a muddle.

The steps you need:

1] Print this out.

2] Disable on-board graphics in your BIOS. Plug your monitor into the NVIDIA card.

3] Either re-install ubuntu or remove all the NVIDIA drivers using synaptic.

Here, I'm assuming a reinstall.

4] Download "Linux Display Driver Version 195.36.31" from nvidia:
http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux-d...31-driver.html

Remember where you downloaded it to ( maybe /home/halfmad/Downloads/NVIDIA-...195.36.31.run )

5] Blacklist the nouveau module. You already know how to do this.

6] <CTRL><ALT><F2> to get a basic terminal (not a GUI one). Login as yourself, then become root:
Code:
sudo  -i
7] Stop X, then generate an xorg.conf, (notice the capital X in the Xorg command) and move it to the right place with the proper name.

Code:
service gdm stop
Xorg  -configure
mv   /root/xorg.conf.new   /etc/X11/xorg.conf
8] Although nouveau is blacklisted (for the next reboot) it may still be loaded, so remove it because NVIDIA won't like it.
Code:
rmmod  nouveau
[EDIT:]
Just thought, you might get an error here, because nouveau is providing the framebuffer for your terminal.
If so, we need to use VESA as a temporary workaround:

Edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf and change the driver from "nouveau" to "vesa"

Code:
nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf
Make the change, save and exit nano
Reboot
Code:
reboot
Don't bother to login to the VESA GUI, just <CTRL><ALT><F2>, login as yourself, then become root with
Code:
sudo -i
Stop X again
Code:
service gdm stop
Carry on with step 9
[/EDIT]

9] Get the C compiler etc. and the kernel headers:
Code:
apt-get  update
apt-get  install  build-essential
apt-get  install  linux-headers-$(uname -r)
10] Change directory to where the NVIDIA run file is Eg
Code:
cd  /home/halfmad/Downloads
11] Make the NVIDIA.....run file executable
Code:
chmod  +x  NVIDIA[press the Tab key for auto-completion of the complex filename]
12] Run it. Notice the dot slash at the start of the next command:
Code:
./NVIDIA[press the Tab key for auto-completion of the complex filename]
Accept the licence, answer the questions, and let it install.
13] Restart X
Code:
service  gdm  start
You should see the NVIDIA logo briefly.
If you are not automatically taken back to the GUI login screen press <CTRL><ALT<F7>

Under System...Preferences you should have "NVIDIA X Server Preferences"

That's it.

For completeness you can now close your root terminal:
<CTRL><ALT><F2>
exit
exit
<CTRL><ALT><F7>

If after a reboot, NVIDIA is still working OK, you can re-enable your on-board video, plug in another monitor, and start experimenting.

Last edited by tredegar; 06-15-2010 at 05:58 AM.
 
Old 06-15-2010, 07:38 AM   #24
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Hi tredegar

Thanks so much for this detailed list. I feel really bad about torturing everyone with this now.

Unfortunately with the onboard video disabled both the alternative and GUI based installers fail. Many of the errors say corruption in low memory and kernel panic.

not sure what to do...

Thanks for you time again-Patrick
 
Old 06-15-2010, 09:28 AM   #25
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
Quote:
Many of the errors say corruption in low memory and kernel panic.
Then maybe you have some bad memory. It is possible the problems you had at post #6 were also due to bad memory.

You have been poking around inside your box (fitting nvidia card etc), maybe you knocked something loose?

Make sure the memory modules are correctly seated in their sockets, you are not "over-clocking" anything, and then run memtest86 (usually a choice on the ubuntu install disk) for a few hours.
 
Old 06-15-2010, 10:27 AM   #26
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Hi tredegar

Thanks again.

I have started the memory test now and I will report back.

One thing I am wondering about. I am consistently getting these memory errors with the video switched to auto but not when switched to onboard.

I repair spectrometers for a living and do circuit analysis every week to every month. I have become quite humble in the process, the more I know, the more I know what I don't know. Even fairly simple circuits can have complex problems. When tackling these Linux issues, is one always "good-to-go" if the chipset is supported? Are there other circuit factors that can make this sort of thing more painful?
 
Old 06-15-2010, 04:28 PM   #27
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
Please confirm that you are trying to install ubuntu on a Dell Dimension 2350, and make it use the NVIDIA card you have installed.

If so, I have done some searching and there are many reported problems with this particular combination. See here:
http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopi...36629&p=225483
and scroll down to the post by Jules Delespy. (I didn't read all his links, feel free to do so )

A search on Dell Dimension 2350 nvidia will give you many more links. I hope you know that there's a better search engine for all things linux at http://www.google.com/linux It saves typing "linux" into every search, and it's at the top of my bookmarks.

I haven't found the solution for you yet, but there will be one as some people, sometimes, seem to have linux running on a 2350 without using the on-board video. So far, they haven't said how though.

Off topic rant: Even here on LQ it surprises me when people post "Problem Solved", but they don't think to say how it was solved. Even when prompted, they cannot be be bothered to answer - "It's working now, what do I care?". The reply would be "We helped you find the solution, the least you can do is post it for others with the same problem."
/Off topic rant

Anyway, I think it is safe for you to stop running memtest86 now, as the problem seems to lie between your BIOS, on-board video and linux.

** Is your nvidia card in an AGP slot, or a PCI slot? Perhaps it matters.

Quote:
When tackling these Linux issues, is one always "good-to-go" if the chipset is supported?
Generally, yes. Unless you have the "Dell BIOS from Hell", of course.
Quote:
Are there other circuit factors that can make this sort of thing more painful?
Yes, but from your job you will already know them: Flaky PSU. Dust causing overheating / intermittent shorts or open circuits. Etc.

I stopped buying Dell in the 90's.
I have my local PC shop (run by nice indian people) build me a system to my specs. I could certainly do it myself (I started in hardware), but at my age, I cannot be bothered. It costs very little. They don't put windows on it. If it doesn't work with linux (they always have) I can take it back, and they say they'll swap stuff around until it does. I'm happy, they are happy, and I'm supporting my local economy.

We seem to be narrowing your problem down. Always a good thing.

HTH.
 
Old 06-15-2010, 05:08 PM   #28
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Thanks yet again tredegar.

I never stopped to look at it from this angle.

I totally agree with you about the whole forum cut-and-run thing. For the record I tried to install a BFGE84512GSP with Nvidia chipset 8400 GS on a Dell Dimension 2350.

I have several computers here but some are quite old. It still might be worth it to install Xubuntu on a PIII for a test.

I might need a couple more days to sort this out but I will report back.


I think it's great that your thinking about your local economy too. Looks like we are seeing some of the downfalls of being so globalized now.

Talk soon-Patrick
 
Old 06-15-2010, 05:27 PM   #29
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
Quote:
I might need a couple more days to sort this out but I will report back.
We'd like that.

Take your time (we all have busy, real lives to lead), but a follow-up would be appreciated.

As you probably know, LQ will send us an email when you add a post to this thread.

Best wishes.
 
Old 06-25-2010, 08:53 PM   #30
HalfMadDad
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Location: Canada
Distribution: Trisquel
Posts: 83

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Whoops, I guess it ended up being more like ten days :-(

I tried the Nvidia card in a Everex computer with a Via processor and in an Asus motherboard based computer I built. Both of them also had kernel errors.

I am going to try another card and see if I get the same problems, it must be something to do with the Linux kernel and this specific board.

I will need a little more time to feedback, I am really overloaded with day job work.

Thanks guys-Patrick
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] radeonhd dual head setup MTK358 Linux - Hardware 12 12-05-2009 09:05 PM
dual Head ( s-video) setup JKoder SUSE / openSUSE 1 03-31-2009 12:25 AM
X dual head card setup with 9200 pro Strike2000 Linux - Software 1 01-18-2008 10:03 AM
xscreensaver - dual head setup n_hendrick Linux - Software 0 07-25-2004 08:40 AM
Dual Head/Monitor Setup MultiMike Linux - General 1 06-03-2004 08:47 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:28 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration