LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 01-31-2015, 09:46 AM   #1
paulmars
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2013
Posts: 20

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
dual boot and trying a different Linux flavor


I just tried Mint again and its still not up to what I need. So, can I install another linux to replace Mint and not loose my win7?

2, 3, and 5 years ago, I tried linux and once I realized it did not do what i needed, I tried to remove it (taking advice from the forums) and I lost access to win7. I dont want that to happen again.

How should I proceed?

pa
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:00 AM   #2
veerain
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Earth bound to Helios
Distribution: Custom
Posts: 2,524

Rep: Reputation: 319Reputation: 319Reputation: 319Reputation: 319
How you have setup partitions for dual OS setup?

Please give details about your setup?

You can replace Mint with another Distro. If you are new be careful.
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:20 AM   #3
paulmars
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2013
Posts: 20

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
500g HDD:

install win7

3 weeks later defrag HDD

Install mint letting it partition HDD for dual boot. 100g for win7, the remainder for mint. With plans to later make mint partition smaller and having a 3rd partition for my files. Have not yet done this because mint gparted and KDE... partitioners dont work.

used mint for 6 weeks and then started using win7 again. mint cant do what I need out of the box.

Might try ubuntu or debian again.

I think I responded to all your questions. I always review questions to be sure that I did not miss anything. However this site this interface does not display your post, so I cant.

pa
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:28 AM   #4
veerain
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Earth bound to Helios
Distribution: Custom
Posts: 2,524

Rep: Reputation: 319Reputation: 319Reputation: 319Reputation: 319
So you can install a different distro to use the space used by current Mint. Each distro has it's tool for partitioning and making filesystems.

Read Manual of each distro for how to setup.
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:33 AM   #5
JeremyBoden
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2011
Posts: 938

Rep: Reputation: 174Reputation: 174
Ubuntu is based on Debian and Mint is based on Ubuntu.

The install and partitioning methods are really very similar.
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:38 AM   #6
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 6,869

Rep: Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247
Quote:
Have not yet done this because mint gparted and KDE... partitioners dont work.
I'll have to disagree with that, it does work. First off, modifying windows partitions is best done from windows, resizing, etc. I would suggest that before you try again you read some detailed tutorials on installing Linux and Mint specifically. Ubuntu or Debian aren't going to make any difference in all likelihood if you can't get Mint to work. The link below is to a detailed tutorial on installing Ubuntu. Mint is based on Ubuntu and uses the same installer and the primary difference you will see installing Mint vs Ubuntu is the background color on the installer.

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/u...all-guide.html

The link below explains in detail how to use GParted:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

The actual GParted Manual at the link below:

http://gparted.org/display-doc.php?name=help-manual

The link below is to a download site where you can download the Mint Manual in different languages which explains installing and gives an introduction to using Mint.

http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php
 
Old 01-31-2015, 01:55 PM   #7
JeremyBoden
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2011
Posts: 938

Rep: Reputation: 174Reputation: 174
Is your disk configured as GPT or MBR?

BTW to remove Linux, boot into Windows and delete the Linux partitions.
Then run the the Windows command which sets up the boot sector (I would research this bit!).
 
Old 01-31-2015, 03:28 PM   #8
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 6,869

Rep: Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247
Quote:
BTW to remove Linux, boot into Windows and delete the Linux partitions.
Then run the the Windows command which sets up the boot sector (I would research this bit!).
Probably be better to reverse that process and install the windows boot code first before deleting his Linux partition if he is using a Linux bootloader. Otherwise he will have an unbootable computer.
 
Old 01-31-2015, 05:17 PM   #9
paulmars
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2013
Posts: 20

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyBoden View Post
Is your disk configured as GPT or MBR?

BTW to remove Linux, boot into Windows and delete the Linux partitions.
Then run the the Windows command which sets up the boot sector (I would research this bit!).
configured however mint install configures it.

That did not work last time or the time before.
 
Old 01-31-2015, 05:29 PM   #10
paulmars
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2013
Posts: 20

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
I'll have to disagree with that, it does work. First off, modifying windows partitions is best done from windows, resizing, etc. I would suggest that before you try again you read some detailed tutorials on installing Linux and Mint specifically. Ubuntu or Debian aren't going to make any difference in all likelihood if you can't get Mint to work. The link below is to a detailed tutorial on installing Ubuntu. Mint is based on Ubuntu and uses the same installer and the primary difference you will see installing Mint vs Ubuntu is the background color on the installer.

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/u...all-guide.html

The link below explains in detail how to use GParted:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

The actual GParted Manual at the link below:

http://gparted.org/display-doc.php?name=help-manual

The link below is to a download site where you can download the Mint Manual in different languages which explains installing and gives an introduction to using Mint.

http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php
I need something that basically works out of the box w/o a lot of online research. I dont mind researching some, but i dont have that much time. I have already spend over 20 hours online trying to find out why my mint does not do what i need it to do. Like why gparted and KDE... partitioners wont let me repartition the mint partition. Why txt files take 10 seconds to open. Why I cant close a txt that I copied from until i paste. If its closed 1st, then pasting results in nothing. over and over this has happened over the weeks. Like why there are tab vertical lines in my txt file text that I need to manually delete after i paste. Like why the rename command is grayed out when I try and rename groups of files. This happens in both file managers in mint. This was the last straw. My work load requires processing lots of jpg pictures and renaming groups of them. I find nowhere on the net why I cant do this. There is more, but I did not start this thread to complain. I tried mint and have spent over 20 hours researching and most all of my issues have gone unsolved. So, mint is not for me. However, I want my HDD space back.

pa
 
Old 01-31-2015, 06:14 PM   #11
JeremyBoden
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2011
Posts: 938

Rep: Reputation: 174Reputation: 174
So how do you select a bunch of files and the machine reads your mind to decide how the rename command is to operate?

Commands such as gparted will allow you to resize or create partitions.
Obviously it's reasonable to be required to unmount a system partition whilst this happens.
So try booting from a USB to carry out this process.

txt files will take a long time to open if they are really huge...
 
Old 01-31-2015, 10:21 PM   #12
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 6,869

Rep: Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247
Quote:
Like why gparted and KDE... partitioners wont let me repartition the mint partition.
You can't change a partition on which the partitioner (GParted) is running. If you want to modify a separate Mint partition, you can do it from Kubuntu. If you want to modify the Kubuntu partition, do it from Mint. You have to unmount a partition before you can make any change to it. It is simpler to use the Live CD of Mint or Kubuntu to modify partitions.

Quote:
Why txt files take 10 seconds to open. Why I cant close a txt that I copied from until i paste.
I've never had a text file take 10 seconds to open unless the system was messed up. I don't have any problem selecting copy, closing the file then pasting to another file so that certainly isn't expected behavior.

Quote:
Like why the rename command is grayed out when I try and rename groups of files
That would be expected behavior if you are logged in as a normal user and are trying to change system file names. Otherwise, it's a bigger problem. If your jpg images are on another partition or if they are outside the /home/user directory you need admin privileges to modify them. Either that or give your user ownership of the directory which is a simple process and done one time.

Sounds like you'd be better off sticking with windows. Make sure you reinstall the windows bootloader to the master boot record BEFORE you delete the Mint partition or your machine will be unbootable, that is if you are currently using the Mint Grub bootloader to boot both Mint and windows. You probably need the windows installation medium to do this. You can then use Disk Management in windows to delete the Mint partition and create another partition for windows.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Triple Boot: Centos + OpenSUSE + Flavor of the week TheCelticDoctor Linux - Distributions 5 05-18-2012 09:41 AM
Can't Boot with Any Flavor of Linux on Twinhead Laptop travelvice Linux - Laptop and Netbook 2 04-04-2008 09:53 AM
Installing dual Boot 98/Linux - WONT 'LILO' Dual Boot !? L1nux3d Linux - Laptop and Netbook 15 02-11-2006 06:36 AM
Help Me! Can't boot install any Linux Flavor on i386 currently with XP Home FunWun Linux - Newbie 10 11-14-2005 02:28 PM
hOw to dual boot linux suse with a dual boot win98/xp pc walterkai SUSE / openSUSE 1 12-14-2004 06:04 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration