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Old 09-25-2012, 12:07 PM   #1
vinay256
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/drive space to be increased


hi
i am new to this forum. I have some question regarding increasing the partition space of / drive in redhat linux 4.5 enterprise.

My question is: I want to increase the partition space of / drive in redhat linux. how to do this.Pls help me with the steps
without losing data.

thanks in advance
 
Old 09-25-2012, 12:15 PM   #2
pixellany
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Welcome to the forum!!

Please note that RedHat 4.X is obsolete---have you considered upgrading?

My favorite partitioning tool is the GParted Live CD. The generic procedure is pretty simple:
---backup all important data
---boot from the GParted CD and make the desired changes

But first, please post the output of "fdisk -l" (Run this as root and note: ELL, not ONE)
 
Old 09-25-2012, 12:49 PM   #3
nijinashok00
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By default Linux doesn't allows to increase or decrease / memory because it is a primary partition. Using 3rd party software may cause lose of data. So it is better to create new partitions with your available free memory. For example you can create a new partition for a directory which utilizes more memory using fdisk utility. If you wish to increase or decrease the partition memory use logical volume.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 04:58 PM   #4
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nijinashok00 View Post
By default Linux doesn't allows to increase or decrease / memory because it is a primary partition. Using 3rd party software may cause lose of data. So it is better to create new partitions with your available free memory. For example you can create a new partition for a directory which utilizes more memory using fdisk utility. If you wish to increase or decrease the partition memory use logical volume.
Some of this is incorrect... For example, Linux can be installed entirely on logical partition. Also, **any** partition with data on it can be resized without data loss----and that resizing can be done with a wide variety of "3rd-party" utilities.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 06:44 PM   #5
Zero Angel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nijinashok00 View Post
By default Linux doesn't allows to increase or decrease / memory because it is a primary partition. Using 3rd party software may cause lose of data. So it is better to create new partitions with your available free memory. For example you can create a new partition for a directory which utilizes more memory using fdisk utility. If you wish to increase or decrease the partition memory use logical volume.
Actually you cannot perform partition operations on any file system that's 'on-line' or mounted. So to resize the partition that's being used as the root of your OS, you would have to boot into a different OS (like a LiveCD) so that you can make adjustements to that partition.

The best set up for that would of course be to have a partition available right after the "/" partition that you could simply delete, and then 'grow' the partition you need more space for. Of course this is not always possible as some people have extended partitions (which are just basically big containers for other partitions) that are positioned just after the root partition on the drive. You may end up having to delete the extended partition and all the other partitions that it contains just so you can make space to 'grow' your root drive.

Now this may be considered a workaround to the situation, but you can also regain space by performing what's called symbolic linking. You could physically move files and folders from your "/" partition onto another partition, thus regaining space in your root partition. Then you can create a symbolic link to the folder you moved over. Provided that the filesystem is the same type and is auto-mounted on boot, you shouldnt have problems. I would recommend, of course, moving non-system files to a new partition (like maybe your pictures, movies, music, etc) just so that your system still boots even if the symlink goes down (and it normally shouldnt, but its always good to be prepared).

Last edited by Zero Angel; 09-27-2012 at 02:23 AM.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 10:08 AM   #6
nijinashok00
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Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
For example, Linux can be installed entirely on logical partition.
Yes Linux can be build entirely on logical partition. But by default logical partitions cannot be re-sized. Only logical volumes are allowed to re-sized by default.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 09:52 PM   #7
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nijinashok00 View Post
Yes Linux can be build entirely on logical partition. But by default logical partitions cannot be re-sized. Only logical volumes are allowed to re-sized by default.
No---logical partitions** can be re-sized with no problem. Perhaps you are referring to something else.

**I am referring to the traditional standard which allows 4 primary partitions on a physical drive---one of which can be an "extended" partition which in turn appears as a container for additional "logical" partitions.
 
  


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