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Old 04-09-2015, 11:07 AM   #16
DJ Shaji
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4.2.3.3 can be found here: https://downloadarchive.documentfoun...e/old/4.2.3.3/

As long as you don't have a really old version running somewhere, it doesn't really matter. Newer versions are more stable and have more features, but the file formats don't change from one minor version to another. That said, it isn't generally a very good idea to stick to an old version when you have to install it afresh. Just install and update to the newest version and you'll be good to go. My 2c
 
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Old 04-09-2015, 01:48 PM   #17
jross
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Quote:
But do I really need to do all those things (increase the swap rate, activate the firewall etc etc)?
I read that page too after installing Xubuntu 14.04. I never bothered with that swap rate thing since I have never heard it mentioned anywhere else and it doesn't seem to be a problem anyway. I did enable the firewall and you should too since it can't hurt(well in our cases anyway). The very first thing I installed from the software center was GUFW (called "Firewall Configuration" in the software center. But since I did just the basic "on" it was a waste of time since you can just turn on the firewall quicker in terminal with
Code:
sudo ufw enable
I would not recommend setting rules unless you REALLY know what you are doing!
check status of firewall:
Code:
 sudo ufw status verbose
This is output I get from simply just turning it on
Code:
Status: active
Logging: on (low)
Default: deny (incoming), allow (outgoing), disabled (routed)
New profiles: skip
Did you go to .deb file and right click on it and then choose open with gdebi?

Last edited by jross; 04-09-2015 at 01:51 PM.
 
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Old 04-09-2015, 05:11 PM   #18
timl
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GreggBell

Quote:
gregg@LG:~/Desktop$ ls
LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb
gregg@LG:~/Desktop$ cd LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb
gregg@LG:~/Desktop/LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb$ sudo apt-get install LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb
[sudo] password for gregg:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
E: Unable to locate package LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb
E: Couldn't find any package by regex 'LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb'
gregg@LG:~/Desktop/LibreOffice_4.2.3.3_Linux_x86_deb$
I should have pointed out that the "*" I use below is a wildcard - select all matches so

Quote:
sudo apt-get install *.deb
means install all files with the deb extension. In this case you DO want to include the "*" in your command

Last edited by timl; 04-09-2015 at 05:12 PM.
 
Old 04-09-2015, 05:37 PM   #19
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timl View Post
GreggBell



I should have pointed out that the "*" I use below is a wildcard - select all matches so



means install all files with the deb extension. In this case you DO want to include the "*" in your command
You can't use apt-get to install .deb packages that way. apt-get will only install packages that it can get from available repositories. To install single packages the way you mean you either use dpkg or one of the frontends that handle dependencies while installing packages, like Gdebi.
 
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:00 PM   #20
timl
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Oh okay, thanks. I am not a debian user so I just adapted how I would do this with yum/dnf on fedora.

Always good to build up the knowledge base.

Cheers
 
Old 04-09-2015, 06:35 PM   #21
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
FWIW: I usually only have to double click and install the first .deb using gdebi installer.
Thanks Habitual. Actually I right clicked (which is what I usually do with gdebi installer) and chose the option to install but it just installed the first folder.
 
Old 04-09-2015, 06:48 PM   #22
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
Find the original .deb file you downloaded, NOT the expanded folder. You need the original .deb. Navigate to the folder where that .deb file is. Use dpkg for installing it. dpkg -i filename.deb, replacing filename with the actual name of the file. Easier, after typing the first few letters of the filename, press Tab and autocompletion should put the full filename on the terminal line, and you can then just press enter. Apt-get will not install local files, that's not what it's for. Gdebi can do it, but it's just a GUI frontend for dpkg, and isn't designed to be run from the command line.
Thanks sgosnell. You know, I remember this being MUCH easier doing the install last time (because I installed 4.2.3.3 on my laptop), but I could not find the individual file. Only the tar and folder. (see screenshot)

So I must be able to get the original .deb. Where do I get it?
Attached Thumbnails
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ID:	18063  
 
Old 04-09-2015, 06:50 PM   #23
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ Shaji View Post
4.2.3.3 can be found here: https://downloadarchive.documentfoun...e/old/4.2.3.3/

As long as you don't have a really old version running somewhere, it doesn't really matter. Newer versions are more stable and have more features, but the file formats don't change from one minor version to another. That said, it isn't generally a very good idea to stick to an old version when you have to install it afresh. Just install and update to the newest version and you'll be good to go. My 2c
Thanks DJ. I'm getting close to doing just what you suggest.
 
Old 04-09-2015, 06:59 PM   #24
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jross View Post
I read that page too after installing Xubuntu 14.04. I never bothered with that swap rate thing since I have never heard it mentioned anywhere else and it doesn't seem to be a problem anyway. I did enable the firewall and you should too since it can't hurt(well in our cases anyway). The very first thing I installed from the software center was GUFW (called "Firewall Configuration" in the software center. But since I did just the basic "on" it was a waste of time since you can just turn on the firewall quicker in terminal with
Code:
sudo ufw enable
I would not recommend setting rules unless you REALLY know what you are doing!
check status of firewall:
Code:
 sudo ufw status verbose
This is output I get from simply just turning it on
Code:
Status: active
Logging: on (low)
Default: deny (incoming), allow (outgoing), disabled (routed)
New profiles: skip
Did you go to .deb file and right click on it and then choose open with gdebi?
Thanks jross. I did the firewall. And you're right--it very easy from the terminal. I tested it. Got the same as you. Thanks.

And yes, I did do the right-click, open with gdebi on the first file and it just opened the first file, though.

I don't know. I have a hard time believing getting the same version is that hard, but I'm getting close to just downloading the latest from the USC.
 
Old 04-11-2015, 12:06 PM   #25
sgosnell
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Have you read the instructions?

https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/.../Install/Linux

It's for 3.x, but it should be the same for 4.x.
 
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Old 04-11-2015, 01:57 PM   #26
JeremyBoden
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There is a problem that occurs if you download packages and use gdebi to install them.

You probably have a program that periodically checks against your repositories for updated packages.
If you installed a package via synaptic or apt-get (etc) and a new version exists you get notified.
There will be a simple way to download and install the changes - typically via a GUI.

If you did a download and used gdebi, it will be your responsibility to do the same next time you want to apply an update.

This is why I avoid gdebi, if at all possible.
The same reasoning applies to downloading source and compiling it.

It also complicates backup and recovery.
You can't just re-install a Linux distro and be ready to go...
 
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Old 04-11-2015, 02:43 PM   #27
beachboy2
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Smile

Gregg Bell,

I hope you don't think I am being rude but please, do take a really deep breath and look at these instructions, in particular A and B:

http://www.libre-software.net/how-to...ntu-linux-mint

It really is not too difficult to install LibreOffice, believe me.

If you seriously want to increase the degree of difficulty in installing a Linux distro, or one of its programs, by a factor of “a rather large number”, then I suggest that you try to install (in no particular order of complexity):

1. CentOS 7.1
2. Slackware
3. Arch

You will then realise that installing LibreOffice in Xubuntu is a very short stroll in the park.

P.S. I have been there!
 
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Old 04-11-2015, 03:42 PM   #28
JeremyBoden
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I agree it's not hard - I've done it in the early days of Libre Office, when it wasn't very stable.

It's just that I like an easy life, so I have only a very few non-repository packages installed.
e.g. printer or graphics drivers.
So I stick to a Mint version of Debian.

I did look at Arch recently - but only very briefly!!!
 
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Old 04-11-2015, 03:46 PM   #29
beachboy2
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Jeremy,

Quote:
It's just that I like an easy life, so I have only a very few non-repository packages installed.
e.g. printer or graphics drivers.
So I stick to a Mint version of Debian.
I could not agree more, but just occasionally I like to "swim with the Linux sharks" on a spare machine.
 
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:26 PM   #30
John VV
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Why dose no one bother to read the README and INSTALL files ?

libreoffice has a very NICE and well written README that informs you as to HOW to install it

from the "LibreOffice_4.4.2_Linux_x86-64_rpm.tar.gz"
the deb will have the same file
/readmes/README_en-US

to QUOTE the debian seciton
Quote:

Installation of LibreOffice on Debian/Ubuntu-based Linux systems
----------------------------------------------------------------------

For instructions on how to install a language pack (after having installed the US English version of LibreOffice), please read the section below entitled Installing a Language Pack.

When you unpack the downloaded archive, you will see that the contents have been decompressed into a sub-directory. Open a file manager window, and change directory to the one starting with "LibreOffice_", followed by the version number and some platform information.

This directory contains a subdirectory called "DEBS". Change directory to the "DEBS" directory.

Right-click within the directory and choose "Open in Terminal". A terminal window will open. From the command line of the terminal window, enter the following command (you will be prompted to enter your root user's password before the command will execute):

The following commands will install LibreOffice and the desktop integration packages (you may just copy and paste them into the terminal screen rather than trying to type them):

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

The installation process is now completed, and you should have icons for all the LibreOffice applications in your desktop's
or
read the instructions on the Libreoffice web page
https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help...l-howto/linux/
that informs you to use your packagemanager
or
read the wiki
https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/...ffice_on_Linux

 
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