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Old 02-15-2014, 01:59 PM   #1
snowkitty
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Does "Loudness Equalization" exist for linux. A feature that exists within Windows.


Question is in the title: Does "Loudness Equalization" exist for linux. A feature that exists within Windows.

I'm NOT asking for an equalizer, that isn't what I'm looking for at all. If you're unfamiliar with what that feature is, it balances audio levels, notably when watching a movie, you set the volume to a decent level, can hear everything fine and then along comes the action scene which is suddenly stupidly loud and you have to turn down the volume, and then right after, you can't hear anything because it went back to quiet mode. This feature balances it so you can hear the quiet parts and the loud parts won't be so intense.

In my searches, I've found quite a lot of people ask this exact question without getting an answer, or getting an answer of how to install an equalizer.
 
Old 02-15-2014, 02:33 PM   #2
bigrigdriver
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The feature you refer to is volume normalization. As it turns out, Mplayer, which is included in most distros, has that feature. Here is a sample command to use.

For more info, google volume normalization for Linux.
 
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:37 PM   #3
sgosnell
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Normalization is not done by the OS, not by Windows, Linux, or OSX. It is done by the program in use. Some programs provide it, some don't. You would have to check each playback program.
 
Old 02-15-2014, 03:37 PM   #4
snowkitty
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"Loudness Equalization" is in the settings for the sound card on Windows that affects all audio that outputs from that sound device. That setting is not set in/by individual programs on Windows, and programs that may have that feature are not what I'm referring to.

Apparently the answer is "no" then.
 
Old 02-15-2014, 04:12 PM   #5
ondoho
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i feel chastised.
 
Old 02-15-2014, 04:56 PM   #6
metaschima
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowkitty View Post
"Loudness Equalization" is in the settings for the sound card on Windows that affects all audio that outputs from that sound device. That setting is not set in/by individual programs on Windows, and programs that may have that feature are not what I'm referring to.

Apparently the answer is "no" then.
The answer is no. However, you should consider yourself lucky to have a sound card with this feature, because that's the first time I've heard of it.
 
Old 02-15-2014, 08:26 PM   #7
snowkitty
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It's been a feature of most the soundcards I've had, on-board Realtek at least. I'm sure it's a feature of the drivers/hardware supportive, I just wondered if it was possible to enable for Linux similarly to Windows. Worked nicely for playing games and such where some sounds were near inaudiable, would raise the volume so you could hear those things, or voice chat where you can't individually adjust users volume (Skype or Mumble), and then also the example above with movies, or even youtube. It'll be nice to be able to set mplayer with that shortcut, so I can at least watch movies with balanced sound though, but this feature was very handy and had tons of different and valuable uses.

Shame this doesn't exist for Linux, despite that I still greatly prefer linux over windows.. it's just little things like this that does make windows better in a few areas.

Last edited by snowkitty; 02-15-2014 at 08:28 PM.
 
Old 02-16-2014, 07:05 AM   #8
sgosnell
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It's still not the operating system that does this. If it's the sound card driver, the manufacturer should make the driver available for other operating systems. But the fact is that many hardware manufacturers, especially, don't make anything available other than Windows, mostly because they don't want to spend the time and money, and they don't want to make the source code available openly. That doesn't make Windows better, except that it's better marketed. Microsoft does one thing very, very well, and that's marketing. They do nothing else well, but that's enough, at least for now.
 
Old 02-16-2014, 08:00 AM   #9
ericson007
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I agree and even though i am not for or against windows, and don't like their os that much, i have to say they did a pretty good job of performance optimization for win8.1
 
Old 02-16-2014, 11:00 AM   #10
metaschima
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I only need volume normalization for movies, where it really is a problem, and mplayer handles that. I see no use for this feature outside of movies, so it doesn't bother me at all.
 
Old 02-16-2014, 01:28 PM   #11
ondoho
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i resent the windows/linux comparison, but this feature might indeed be useful on a system-wide level.
if you find a program that can perform normalization on the fly (sox?) it is most certainly possible to tie that into your sound architecture. jackaudio might already have sth like that. or maybe kde's sound architecture? kde is so fancy.
on plain alsa it is technically also possible, i think, but would require near-godlike capabilities.
 
Old 02-17-2014, 03:45 AM   #12
cascade9
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I _believe_ its possible with LADSPA, but I've never done it myself....I dont use normalisation at all, all my audio files are replaygained, and I dont really have an issue with changing volume anyway.

But this might help-

https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=99185
 
Old 02-17-2014, 03:02 PM   #13
snowkitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
It's still not the operating system that does this. If it's the sound card driver, the manufacturer should make the driver available for other operating systems. But the fact is that many hardware manufacturers, especially, don't make anything available other than Windows, mostly because they don't want to spend the time and money, and they don't want to make the source code available openly. That doesn't make Windows better, except that it's better marketed. Microsoft does one thing very, very well, and that's marketing. They do nothing else well, but that's enough, at least for now.
It's still a feature that exists within Windows. That's what I said, and that's still true. Within the entirety of everything contained inside "Windows" (software, drivers, OS/kernel, ect), it is a feature that lies within the Windows environment and experience.
I'm not debating whether it's a Microsoft feature. It's a fact that it IS a feature that exists in the environment of Windows.

I did explain the entire variety of things that it is a useful feature for., more than movies, I only explained with movies because it's something I know a lot of people can relate to more than wearing a headset and being unable to hear some people while other people blast out your ear drums and make your ears hurt.

As for the "comparison" of Linux/Windows and finding it offensive, I'm sorry that there's some things that one OS has that another doesn't. I personally find the entire sound system on Linux to be somewhat sloppy based on all of my experiences on my desktop and laptops. I constantly fight issues between programs where if I don't start program A before program B, then program A won't have audio. Not all programs support the same audio backends. There's several audio backends, and they're not all entirely compatible to coexist with one another all the time. For instance, I have two programs I use for voice chat, if I open one first (which uses PulseAudio and I cannot change that), the other program will not be able to use audio at all (which only uses ALSA). So in comparison, I've never had these issues with Windows or OSX. This problem is exclusive to Linux. I'm not whining that linux is horrible, simply these are some of the issues and challenges I deal with that I'm looking for fixes for as I can find them or figure out solutions for them. If you have something constructive or useful to reply with, I'd like to hear it. I do wish to get these issues resolved for my uses, and hopefully be able to have answers posted for anyone else who has these same experiences.

ondoho: it is mainly ALSA & PulseAudio that everything I'm using runs through.
cascade9: Thank you, I'll look into that link.
 
  


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