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Old 05-20-2013, 08:00 PM   #1
imbandol
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Do cave man need to learn math?


I heard that in order to work with computer programs or computer in general, that i need to know a lot of math? Is that true?
I heard that to solve problems with computer programs or work with computer, that i have to have a good back ground in math? Is that true?
I heard if you don't know math, a person will fail computer programs and everything else in computer industries? Is that true?
 
Old 05-20-2013, 08:07 PM   #2
stonesharh
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While mathmatics is indeed very important in computing fields, I don't believe someone would simply fail at everything related to them if they weren't good at math.

What I do think is important is the ability to think logically and apply problem solving techniques and mindsets used in math to the problems faced in technical work.

Also, one bit of math that is useful to know is your base 2s. 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 128, 256, 512, 1024, and so on.
 
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Old 05-20-2013, 08:44 PM   #3
Habitual
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No.
No.
No.
 
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:57 PM   #4
rokytnji
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Math is not needed to drive a car.
Math is not needed to drive a motorcycle
Just a GED graduate tattooed Motorcycle riding Linux using biker running linux.
Sometimes boots Windows to http://www.mastertune.net/harleydavidson.htm

Linux, so simple a caveman or biker can use it. And. Use it well.
 
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Old 05-20-2013, 10:19 PM   #5
cortman
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Why not try "working with computer programs or computers in general" and find out?
If you're curious, jump in!
 
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Old 05-20-2013, 11:26 PM   #6
lleb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imbandol View Post
I heard that in order to work with computer programs or computer in general, that i need to know a lot of math? Is that true?
That depends on the level of programming you wish to perform. For basic scripting no math is required. Same goes for using computers. There is zero math required to USE a computer. You did not need math to type your request, you are using the computer.

Quote:
I heard that to solve problems with computer programs or work with computer, that i have to have a good back ground in math? Is that true?
again, that all depends on what kind of programming you are doing. If you are dealing with programs that perform high levels of surface collisions then yes you will have to at least have Calc III at the least, but if you are dealing with code that is nothing more then word processing you wont need much math. again see statement above when it comes to working with computers.

Quote:
I heard if you don't know math, a person will fail computer programs and everything else in computer industries? Is that true?
see above. math is only required if you will be dealing with software that requires math. graphics, graphing, engineering, etc...

in short as long as you are willing to put forth the time, you can be good at computers.
 
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Old 05-20-2013, 11:38 PM   #7
jpollard
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If you are programming then math helps as everything a computer does is math. At a minimum, understanding basic algebra.

Finding bugs in software is very closely related to finding errors in math - it uses exactly the same methods.

Finding out why something runs like a dog is also math, and is not necessarily easy math.

If you are doing any kind of complex programming, understanding math will make it simpler.

Last edited by jpollard; 05-20-2013 at 11:40 PM.
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 04:12 PM   #8
jefro
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Oppps, sort of already noted above.

What tends to be a sort of true statement would be that people who are able to solve problems (such as math) they also tend to be good at making programs work.
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 04:59 PM   #9
Lantzvillian
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And while not noted, basic electronic math like counting bytes, converting numbers into hex from binary are very useful in networking. So while its okay to say that you don't need to learn math to use computers; it just makes troubleshooting and advanced tasks easier
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 05:44 PM   #10
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If you can get your head wrapped around the fact that Linux starts counting at zero, you're Golden.

Code:
seq 0 4 | wc -l
5
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 05:49 PM   #11
Beryllos
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More than anything, you must have a logical mindset. Attention to detail is also very important.

If you operate a computer, sooner or later things will go wrong, and you will need to be a detective, a puzzle solver, or a troubleshooter. If you write a program, it probably will not work right the first time. You need to understand, in detail, what the program is supposed to be doing, observe what the program is actually doing, figure out why, and figure out how to make it work.
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 05:51 PM   #12
k3lt01
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Maybe not Maths, afterall I'm studying IT and don't have to do any Maths, but most certainly you do need a good understanding of language and grammar in order to code properly.
 
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Old 05-21-2013, 06:31 PM   #13
Nbiser
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No, you don't need to learn math to run a computer. I know a very little bit of Algebra, no geometry, no trigonometry, and am only so-so at math in general, and I still know how to use a computer, and am successfully studying for the Linux+ certification exam. Those who are telling you that you need to know a lot of math have probably never worked with computers in their lives!
 
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Old 05-22-2013, 05:24 AM   #14
jpollard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nbiser View Post
No, you don't need to learn math to run a computer. I know a very little bit of Algebra, no geometry, no trigonometry, and am only so-so at math in general, and I still know how to use a computer, and am successfully studying for the Linux+ certification exam. Those who are telling you that you need to know a lot of math have probably never worked with computers in their lives!
No, we have worked with them for years.

A computer is a machine to process mathematics. The original definition of "computer" was "a person who computes".

We have worked VERY hard to make USING a computer easy.

But programming a computer is a mathematical activity, and uses mathematical logic to derive solutions to problems. People that forget that or refuse to believe that usually produce code that is hard to understand, hard to debug, and next to impossible to extend.

I say "usually" because sometimes some people happen to have a good mindset without training, with some fault of the education system for a lack of a mathematical exposure, can do good work.

It happens, but rarely.

Last edited by jpollard; 05-22-2013 at 05:26 AM.
 
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:58 AM   #15
rtmistler
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imbandol you wrote "computer programs" several times. If you're so horrible at Math, or don't wish to try at all on the subject, then don't waste your time "programming".

"Using" a computer is vastly different from writing actual programs. And like anything in life, there are exceptions as Nbiser states; however if you are tasked to write a signal processing program and have zero concept about Math, then you're not going to be able to complete the task. You'll be able to write the "Hello World" examples, and once you start doing any larger projects, you may find that you'll have to have some minimal aptitude for Mathematics, at the very least addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
 
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