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Old 02-25-2011, 12:36 PM   #1
parkarnoor
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DNS server


Hi all,

i have ADSL router provied by ISP and have internet connection. DHCP is configured on that and is providing ip address to three machines in my home network.

i configured one machine named server.example.com as master DNS server.

i able to start named service. now on the linux client what settings i need to configure.

i set /etc/resolve to 192.168.1.4 which is above master DNS server. but i am receiving ip from adsl router which is overwriting /etc/resolve and setting its own ip which is 192.168.1.1. how will i test DNS client with DNS master server.

since i created DNS server on my local network. i am also trying dig server.example.com. but no response. i think because of adsl router. i need to do some settings.

kindly suggest. if modification is required on router also or not.

thanks

parkar
UAE
 
Old 02-25-2011, 12:54 PM   #2
corp769
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Before I go answering your actual questions, can I ask why you are trying to set up a DNS server on your internal network, when you specifically stated that you already have an ISP? With only three computers, you do not need your own DNS service on your network, you can use your router specifically just for that. Your DHCP server, aka your router, will handle that information through your ISP.
 
Old 02-25-2011, 01:12 PM   #3
Noway2
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There are two practical reasons I can think of why one would want to do this: 1 - so that you can communicate between the machines using names rather than IP addresses, and 2- if your ISP's DNS servers fail a lot, which at least used to be common, you can have your own backup name server.

I personally like this set of how-to documents for this kind of activity. There are about 3 tutorials in the set. I have my LAN configured with two servers performing primary and backup DHCP and DNS. I can resolve machine names on my internal and external domains. I also host my own domain (public) DNS servers, which made adding things like SPF and DKIM records easier. It really is not a difficult task, is fun to setup, and being able to resolve all the LAN machines by forward and reverse lookup is in my opinion 'cool'. Granted when I first set it up, there was little practical need, but as things expanded, I am glad that I have my own DNS servers.
 
Old 02-25-2011, 01:15 PM   #4
corp769
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noway2 View Post
There are two practical reasons I can think of why one would want to do this: 1 - so that you can communicate between the machines using names rather than IP addresses, and 2- if your ISP's DNS servers fail a lot, which at least used to be common, you can have your own backup name server.

I personally like this set of how-to documents for this kind of activity. There are about 3 tutorials in the set. I have my LAN configured with two servers performing primary and backup DHCP and DNS. I can resolve machine names on my internal and external domains. I also host my own domain (public) DNS servers, which made adding things like SPF and DKIM records easier. It really is not a difficult task, is fun to setup, and being able to resolve all the LAN machines by forward and reverse lookup is in my opinion 'cool'. Granted when I first set it up, there was little practical need, but as things expanded, I am glad that I have my own DNS servers.
Ok, so I see your point as far as experimenting and learning. Yes, that is true. But there are also alternatives out there, such as OpenDNS - http://www.opendns.com/
 
Old 02-25-2011, 02:24 PM   #5
EricTRA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noway2 View Post
There are two practical reasons I can think of why one would want to do this: 1 - so that you can communicate between the machines using names rather than IP addresses,
Hi,

A lot easier to set up with the /etc/hosts file in my humble opinion :-) Just pointing out the obvious.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:26 PM   #6
corp769
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTRA View Post
Hi,

A lot easier to set up with the /etc/hosts file in my humble opinion :-) Just pointing out the obvious.

Kind regards,

Eric
Thought about that before, just didn't say anything because I was trying to go with what the OP wanted to do
 
Old 02-25-2011, 03:54 PM   #7
jmc1987
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corp769 View Post
Before I go answering your actual questions, can I ask why you are trying to set up a DNS server on your internal network, when you specifically stated that you already have an ISP? With only three computers, you do not need your own DNS service on your network, you can use your router specifically just for that. Your DHCP server, aka your router, will handle that information through your ISP.
It can also give you faster DNS inquiries if your isp has a high load on thier dns servers.

I think there is a way you can configure your dhcp server to not pull dns servers with a option but I would have to look it up. But quick solution have your system pull an IP that is outside your routers IP pool and just configure you DNS server in.
 
  


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