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Old 07-29-2005, 05:54 PM   #1
mburoff
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Registered: Jul 2005
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Distro for AMD 64 Dual Core


I'm an expert windows user; however I've gotten fed up with the bs that Bill Gates pulls. I've played around with Ubuntu and Fedora Core 3 on a 10 year old machine that I have. Right now, I'm looking to replace windows with linux on my brand new machine. I'm running AMD Athlon 64 X2 4800+, Asus A8N - SLI Delux Mobo (don't have SLI, just a 6800 Ultra) and an Audigy 2. I'm looking for a nice stable distro for 64 bit that can support my hardware. As far as the aspect of migrating from windows to linux, I'm comfortable in command line, but I wouldn't call myself an avid user. Any help I can get on a distro would be greatly appreciated. I apologize in advance if there have been previous posts involving 64 bit dual cores, I couldn't seem to find them. Thank you.


-Marshall
 
Old 07-29-2005, 06:59 PM   #2
tuxdev
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I would think that the dual-core part does not matter, since the big optimization is in the instruction set. However, it is generally recommended to run in 32 bit mode cause 64 is kinda unstable. You can always experimentally compile the kernel for 64 bit architecture.
 
Old 07-29-2005, 11:01 PM   #3
guitarman_usa
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Hey, check out Slamd64, the "unofficial" port of Slackware 10.1 to the 64-bit architecture at Slamd64 project . I can not guarantee that it will support your hardware, as there are not many 64-bit drivers available at the moment. But trust me, once there are, I will be one of the first users to switch to 64-bit Linux!! Hope that helps you.

And by the way, sweet processor!!!!




guitarman_usa
AMD 64 3500+
Jetway SLI mobo
2x 80GB WD Caviars (RAID 0)
1GB Ram
Nvidia 6600 Pro PCI-e x16 (SLI ready)
Slackware 10.1
 
Old 07-29-2005, 11:32 PM   #4
DeadPenguin
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Here are some good 64 Distros:

1. Fedora Core 4 (64)
2. Ubuntu 5.04 (64)
3. Suse 9.3 (64)
4. Gentoo 2005.0 (64)
5. Debian (64)
64 bit distros


I have not had any problems running Fedora Core 4 on similar hardware.
AMD64 3000+ 939
MSI K8N Neo 2 mobo
2 WD 250 Sata in Raid0 (aid)
Nvidia 6800 not Ultra card.

FC4 is nice. Nice GUI installer(Anaconda).
I have not tried Ubuntu 64, but I like the x86 version. apt-get is O.K.
Suse is nice intro distro. Yast is very friendly, but I don't like it.
Gentoo steep learning curve, but soid distro. I really like emerge.(good luck with the install read the manual.)
Never used Debian.

I don't think the dual core should be an issue with which distro you chose.
I hope this helps.

Regards,
Blair

Last edited by DeadPenguin; 07-29-2005 at 11:39 PM.
 
Old 07-29-2005, 11:42 PM   #5
DeadPenguin
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Link to a good article on dual core and Linux:
LinuxHardware
 
Old 07-29-2005, 11:59 PM   #6
mburoff
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Thanks so much guys. It's just amazing the help and support you can get from your peers with linux. That's something that windows can't offer. Makes me all the more confident about my decision.
 
Old 07-30-2005, 11:51 PM   #7
DeadPenguin
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Welcome to LQ.
 
Old 07-31-2005, 12:52 AM   #8
Electro
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Just make sure your kernel is configure for SMP or else Linux will use just one core. Also not all programs are written with multi-threading.
 
Old 11-24-2006, 10:36 AM   #9
lexwoodrum
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slamd64 11.0

I downloaded sladm64 10.2 a year or so ago, using a hard disk install.

I didn't have the CDROM write set up, so I wrote the sata.i bootdisk and rootdisk, the install.1, install.2,
from the bootdisks and rootdisks directories.
Then I entered the install path and everything was installed OK.

Now, there are no bootdisk and rootdisk directories in the slamd64 directory.
When I install now I get errors, because there is nothing in /usr/bin except zcat after it finishes.

So,
(1) What happened to the disk images? The disk images
from the slackware 11.0 disk seem to work, but fails at the end when the files are not found. The 10.2 diskettes
don't work either.

(2) Am I forgetting to copy something? The hard disk install directions now seem to be missing from the slamd64 site.

Thanks,
Lex Woodrum
 
Old 12-20-2006, 11:24 PM   #10
Shingoshi
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Lightbulb Maybe I can help... If all else fails!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lexwoodrum
I downloaded sladm64 10.2 a year or so ago, using a hard disk install.

I didn't have the CDROM write set up, so I wrote the sata.i bootdisk and rootdisk, the install.1, install.2,
from the bootdisks and rootdisks directories.
Then I entered the install path and everything was installed OK.

Now, there are no bootdisk and rootdisk directories in the slamd64 directory.
When I install now I get errors, because there is nothing in /usr/bin except zcat after it finishes.

So,
(1) What happened to the disk images? The disk images
from the slackware 11.0 disk seem to work, but fails at the end when the files are not found. The 10.2 diskettes
don't work either.

(2) Am I forgetting to copy something? The hard disk install directions now seem to be missing from the slamd64 site.

Thanks,
Lex Woodrum
I am running Slamd64-11.0. I installed it on top of an existing Slackware-11.0 system. I installed from a dvd drive. I was having some sort of trouble with the install to begin with. I forget if it was a single issue or more. I think I had trouble loading the proper drivers. I am using XFS on RAID5, running from a Promise TX4-plus SATA2 controller. This is how I had my system set up before upgrading to slamd64. I am trying to work through my memory here. I do remember having to do all of this in stages. First I had to use the old slackware cd to get to my xfs system. I copied the entire slamd64 installation files to disk. I then had to go back and somehow reach my RAID5 array. This is way more complicated than anyone would typically encounter. I am using 3 different filesystems. EXT3 XFS and JFS. I had only wanted to use XFS, but there was an issue with not knowing the correct code for cfdisk to assign the filesystem. So I settled on JFS because I knew it would work for what I wanted.

For those of you who aren't aware, I can't stress strongly enough the benefits of using a journaling filesystem. These are Reiserfs Ext4 (when available) XFS and JFS. If you have used Linux for any length of time, you will experience errors on the EXT3 filesystem. Often it is difficult or near impossible to repair. Journaling just takes that added level of stress and disposes of it. Your problems are quite literally FLUSHED!

To avoid problems like mine, either download the cd's or the entire installation directory (from the internet) for the distribution of your choice. Save it to a disk you know is reliable and has a filesystem that can be read by your new kernel. If you have the cd's, and you already have a running Linux system, copy ALL of the installation files to disk as described above. Copy them to the topmost directory of any mounted filesystem.

So if for instance you have /usr mounted on it's own partition (say hda3), do mkdir -p /usr/pub. When you begin your installation, that directory will now be on /dev/hda3 with the directory heading of /pub. /usr won't be visible to the installation system, because /usr is part of the pre-existing / which isn't mounted yet. So all of you installation files will be under /pub/Slackware or whatever other name you have chosen. Typically though, it must be one that the new system recognizes as valid.

This is the best route for installations. The reason for this is simple. The installation will run faster and be more stable. Quite often some (old) cdroms (or controllers) will lose the IRQ's mid-cycle, leaving you with an incomplete installation. That sort of thing will seldom happen if you install from a directory on a hard disk.

You are far less likely to wind up with files corrupted during installation because of errors which may or not be obvious from an errant cdrom. Harddrives run faster than cdroms. You'll spend less time installing. Only install those files you need to make the new kernel run. You can add to these Midnight Commander and any required networking software. MC will give you the ability to quickly navigate through all or your filesystems. You can also edit any configuration files (like lilo) if you need to. Use the "touch" command to create new files. Example, "touch anyfile.conf". MC also has ftp accessibility built into it. So if you need more files from the net, you can get them that way. Also make sure you have Links or Lynx installed as well. These are text browsers that really come in handy if you can't run your desktop.

After you have these essential files installed, and you have a running system, you can always go back and install your optional software. With Slackware and most others, make sure you install ALL of your libraries in the first run. For novices, these are your lib*files. You don't need to initially install a desktop, but be certain you have all of your libraries installed by default.

If you get this far, you shouldn't have any problems you can't work your way out of. If at all possible, have another running system available to you during the installation. It will significantly reduce your stress. If for no other reason than if you forgot something, like an additional download, you won't be caught with only one computer which isn't able to run. It's kind of like being stuck in a cave with a flashlight and dead batteries. Pick up an old computer if you don't already have one. They are cheap enough, and you can use it later to run IpCop for your firewall.

If none of this helped, I am very sorry! I tried.

Last edited by Shingoshi; 12-20-2006 at 11:31 PM.
 
Old 12-21-2006, 12:27 AM   #11
JimBass
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There are actually 2 similiar yet important distinctions to check into. Dual core is supported by any multi processor kernel, which usually has the designation "smp". You can install a kernel (with no work on your part, ie you don't need to compile it yourself unless you want to) in either 32 bit or 64 bit memory space.

At present, if you want things to "just work", you'll have a much easier time not running a 64 bit architecture. For servers, 64 bit is fairly well supported, outside of GUI activities. For desktop systems, there is no 64 bit firefox, java under 64 bit is difficult, flash under 64 bit is still at an extremely unstable point, and open office doesn't have a 64 bit port.

There are ways around it, you can install a 32 bit firefox, and with chroots and links get it to almost be perfect, but as somebody running a smp 64 bit system on my desktop, I can assure you it is a pain in the ass. I do the vast majority of my website viewing on my 32 bit laptop, as at present viewing the net without flash and java is almost impossible.

It isn't at all impossible to run a 64 bit system for a desktop, just that many of the nicities are not present in any easy to use fashion yet. They will be, probably sooner rather than later, but if that is a day/week/month/year(s) remains to be seen.

If I had it to do over again, I'd probably run the 32bit OS at the present time, and wait until 64 bit gets a bit more friendly. Here's my system info:

Code:
jim@JimsBeastie:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
processor       : 0
vendor_id       : AuthenticAMD
cpu family      : 15
model           : 43
model name      : AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4200+
stepping        : 1
cpu MHz         : 2200.199
cache size      : 512 KB
physical id     : 0
siblings        : 2
core id         : 0
cpu cores       : 2
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 1
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt lm 3dnowext 3dnow pni lahf_lm cmp_legacy
bogomips        : 4402.52
TLB size        : 1024 4K pages
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management: ts fid vid ttp

processor       : 1
vendor_id       : AuthenticAMD
cpu family      : 15
model           : 43
model name      : AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4200+
stepping        : 1
cpu MHz         : 2200.199
cache size      : 512 KB
physical id     : 0
siblings        : 2
core id         : 1
cpu cores       : 2
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 1
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt lm 3dnowext 3dnow pni lahf_lm cmp_legacy
bogomips        : 4400.62
TLB size        : 1024 4K pages
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management: ts fid vid ttp

jim@JimsBeastie:~$ uname -a
Linux JimsBeastie 2.6.19 #1 SMP Sun Dec 3 20:06:50 EST 2006 x86_64 GNU/Linux
Peace,
JimBass
 
  


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