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Old 01-27-2010, 10:18 AM   #1
amirsd
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Display mount points on a partition


If there is a partition. e.g /dev/sda1 is there a command that I can use to display all mount points on this particular partition. Any tip would be nice.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 10:21 AM   #2
macemoneta
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Mount points

A mount point is just a directory until it is used. If you want to know what mount points are in use, the 'mount' command with no parameters will display them.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 10:23 AM   #3
amani
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mount points are basically folders (files)

You can use any empty folder that is not being used

#mount


read
#man mount
 
Old 01-27-2010, 01:49 PM   #4
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by amani View Post
mount points are basically folders (files)

You can use any empty folder that is not being used

#mount


read
#man mount
'mount point' is a directory not a folder. This is not M$, synonymous but typical description when speaking GNU/Linux or even UNIX.

Quote:
excerpt 'mount point';
Mount point

In Unix-like systems, the mount point is the location in the operating system's directory structure where a mounted file system appears. For example, many modern Linux distributions automatically mount the CD drive as /media/cdrom, so the contents of the CD drive will appear in the /media/cdrom directory.

Normally only the root user can mount a new file system usually using the mount utility, but there are often provisions to allow normal users to mount removable media, such as the pmount package.

Microsoft Windows

The equivalent to mounting in Microsoft Windows is known as mapping a drive. In these systems, all files and directories available to the operating system and its users are to be found relative to the root directory (\), whether those directories are on the same machine or not.

Microsoft's NTFS 3 also supports Volume Mount Points through the use of NTFS reparse points, which allows volumes to be mounted at arbitrary locations in the file system in addition to the standard drive letters (e.g. C:, E.
Quote:
excerpt from Mounting Definition;
Mounting is the attaching of an additional filesystem to the currently accessible filesystem of a computer.

A filesystem is a hierarchy of directories (also referred to as a directory tree) that is used to organize files on a computer or storage media (e.g., a CDROM or floppy disk). On computers running Linux or other Unix-like operating systems, the directories start with the root directory, which is the directory that contains all other directories and files on the system and which is designated by a forward slash ( / ). The currently accessible filesystem is the filesystem that can be accessed on a computer at a given time.

In order to gain access to files on a storage device, the user must first inform the operating system where in the directory tree to mount the device. A device in a mounting context can be a partition (i.e., a logically independent section) on a hard disk drive (HDD), a CDROM, a floppy disk, a USB (universal serial bus) key drive, a tape drive, or any other external media. For example, to access the files on a CDROM, the user must inform the system to make the filesystem on the CDROM appear in some directory, typically /mnt/cdrom (which exists for this very purpose).

The mount point is the directory (usually an empty one) in the currently accessible filesystem to which a additional filesystem is mounted. It becomes the root directory of the added directory tree, and that tree becomes accessible from the directory to which it is mounted (i.e., its mount point). Any original contents of a directory that is used as a mount point become invisible and inaccessible while the filesystem is still mounted.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 04:11 PM   #5
worm5252
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fyi mount without any options just displays the contents of /etc/mtab
 
Old 02-01-2010, 11:09 AM   #6
amani
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@onebuck, the concept of 'folder' is used in Mac as well and in *nix everything is a file. Of course, mount points are directories, but I was explaining to a M$ user.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 01:40 PM   #7
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by amani View Post
@onebuck, the concept of 'folder' is used in Mac as well and in *nix everything is a file. Of course, mount points are directories, but I was explaining to a M$ user.
Then use the proper definitions and separate the OS from each other.

 
  


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