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Old 06-21-2010, 11:12 AM   #1
KR4ZY54N
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Smile Disk Partition Help


Hi,

i will be installing a frsh copy of OpenSuse 11.2 on my 80 GB hdd.

i would like to know what will be the ideal disk space allocation for / , /boot, /usr , /opt & others?

Should i choose the default layout?

Plzs guide me regarding this.

Thanx
 
Old 06-21-2010, 11:34 AM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KR4ZY54N View Post
Hi,
i will be installing a frsh copy of OpenSuse 11.2 on my 80 GB hdd.

i would like to know what will be the ideal disk space allocation for / , /boot, /usr , /opt & others?

Should i choose the default layout?
Plzs guide me regarding this.
Thanx
Spell your words out, please.

You can keep the default layout, or you can customize it. There is no 'ideal' layout. However, there are some things you can do to help make your life easier down the road.

In the case of an 80GB hard drive, I'd do three things. First, make your swap partition about the same size as your RAM. You can make it smaller, but again, there are no 'rules' about it...that's just what I do. Second, make your "/" partition to be about 20 GB, and leave the rest as "/home". Why? Because 20GB is enough for the OS, and will contain the /var, /opt, /usr directories. Will give you room to load more software, and lave you plenty of space for your DATA in /home. When it comes time to upgrade your OS, you can just reformat the / partition, and leave /home alone...your data will be untouched, and the new OS goes right in cleanly.

Again, that's just what *I* would do. There are no real rules to it, and you can keep the default layout if you want.
 
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:52 PM   #3
tredegar
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^^ I like TB0ne's idea (perhaps because that is exactly what I usually do, except I just give the OS 10GB.)

But it doesn't really matter, because you can always change your partitioning later by booting from a "live CD" with parted or gparted.
 
Old 06-21-2010, 01:10 PM   #4
DavidMcCann
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The essentials are
/
/home
About 10GB will be fine for root, unless you're going to run a server. I've currently got just 4GB of software.

You only need /boot with logical volume management, which is a waste of time on a home system. You only need swap if you intend to hibernate or if you have a tiny memory (say 256MB or less): use 1GB if so. Other directories are only given a partition on servers.
 
Old 06-21-2010, 01:14 PM   #5
saikee
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Why not have the simplest? One partition 10Gb or upward for / and one for swap.

All the /home, /var, /boot etc just sudiretcories to it. Easy to maintain too.

Do yoy really need separate partitions for one Linux and know how to use them?

No Linux distro ever refuses to be installed into one partition. You need a separate /boot only if you use a LVM.

Last edited by saikee; 06-21-2010 at 01:16 PM.
 
Old 06-21-2010, 02:11 PM   #6
catkin
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If you are planning to suspend-to-disk you need a swap partition dedicated to it which is as big as the memory plus the/any usual swap partition (or file) plus a bit.
 
Old 06-22-2010, 04:16 AM   #7
KR4ZY54N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Spell your words out, please.

You can keep the default layout, or you can customize it. There is no 'ideal' layout. However, there are some things you can do to help make your life easier down the road.

In the case of an 80GB hard drive, I'd do three things. First, make your swap partition about the same size as your RAM. You can make it smaller, but again, there are no 'rules' about it...that's just what I do. Second, make your "/" partition to be about 20 GB, and leave the rest as "/home". Why? Because 20GB is enough for the OS, and will contain the /var, /opt, /usr directories. Will give you room to load more software, and lave you plenty of space for your DATA in /home. When it comes time to upgrade your OS, you can just reformat the / partition, and leave /home alone...your data will be untouched, and the new OS goes right in cleanly.

Again, that's just what *I* would do. There are no real rules to it, and you can keep the default layout if you want.
Thanks for your help.
 
Old 06-22-2010, 06:57 AM   #8
johnsfine
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In my opinion, if you don't really understand why you are partitioning /home outside of the rest of / then you shouldn't do it. Keeping that all as one partition saves you the trouble of guessing how much to give each and saves you the trouble of fixing that guess later.

My opinion for a swap partition (on an 80GB disk) is make it 2GB. Obviously, that is not the best size for your swap partition. But figuring out the best size is probably impossible at this point. 2GB is very likely big enough (unless you have unusual needs for extra swap). 2GB is very likely a small enough fraction of your 80GB that if you didn't really need so much swap, that mistake does no noticeable harm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
When it comes time to upgrade your OS, you can just reformat the / partition, and leave /home alone.
If it routinely worked that way, that would be a good reason to keep /home separate. I'm sure for some Linux upgrades, some Linux experts can get that approach to work. I've never seen it work. Lots of settings are stored in the /home directory and the upgrade typically conflicts with those settings trashing both. The only upgrade method I trust is to use a liveCD to shrink the installed Linux partition(s) enough to allow a new partition big enough for the new version. Then install the new version, copy everything you want to keep across from the old version, and later delete the old partitions. That plan depends on having a lot of free space, but I don't trust any other approach.

Last edited by johnsfine; 06-22-2010 at 07:05 AM.
 
Old 06-22-2010, 05:33 PM   #9
jefro
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I never bother with partitions on home systems.
 
Old 06-22-2010, 07:07 PM   #10
John VV
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Quote:
I never bother with partitions on home systems.
i do .After long years with fedora and reinstalling every 6 months .

I set up a DATA partition that all my photos,music,ect... are on

if suse is all that is on it let the installer do it's thing. A default settings install is fine .

BUT a question -- a 80 gig drive?
is this on a rather old computer ? if so you might find OpenSUSE a bit slow
on new hardware it is fine but on old?
i was tapping my fingers saying to my self " come on,come on open up" on every window .

i kind of think that suse but everything in it ,including the kitchen sink ( and the neighbors kitchen sink also)
 
  


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