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Old 09-26-2007, 10:07 AM   #1
enthus
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Question differences betwenn desktop, workstation and server


Are the kernels different in desktop, workstation and server distros?
and what makes some distros called "desktop" while some others are uesed as servers.
thanks
 
Old 09-26-2007, 10:15 AM   #2
lord-fu
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A lot offer different kernels.

The difference between distros is sometimes huge, could you be more specific in what you are trying to figure out (specific distros maybe?), There is massive differences between say Ubuntu and Slackware. Usually the differences between "desktop" and "server" is applications installed (good ones offer chrooted daemons).

Welcome to LQ!
 
Old 09-26-2007, 01:34 PM   #3
Poetics
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Much as lord-fu said, many distributions are "marketed" for a particular environment, or type of user. Slackware, for example, is generally geared toward those who want to get down-and-dirty in the command-line, with few wizards or built-in help prompts. It was perfect for me, and I love how minimalistic I can make it, which makes it quite good for servers, but that type of setup isn't fitting for many people.

The difference between "Workstation," "Desktop," and "Server" is largely a matter of use -- a Desktop is traditionally a box that wouldn't be used for work, a Workstation a box primarily used for office-related applications, and a Server is a machine that is connected to by other computers, and generally doesn't have a need for direct KVM input (keyboard, video, mouse). All of these are defined by the applications and services installed. The kernel itself doesn't change much, other than offering SMP (multiple-processor) support if needed; I use the same kernel (albeit with different modules) on four different machines -- a desktop, a workstation, and two servers.

Take a look around and you will find many many many many many threads on choosing the right distribution, as well as many forums for specific distros -- I'm sure you can find one that will both suit your needs and suit your computer usage style.

Last edited by Poetics; 09-26-2007 at 01:35 PM.
 
Old 09-27-2007, 06:38 AM   #4
enthus
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thanks, i think i've got it.
 
  


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