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Old 10-21-2014, 03:27 PM   #1
hongman
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Differences between "get/install" commands


Hi

Over the last week of messing about and following about 10,000 guides, I have another question that popped into my mind!

What are the differences between these?

apt-get install, dpkg, svn co, git clone, gem install, others?
 
Old 10-22-2014, 01:46 PM   #2
rtmistler
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They are different package managers. I'm not well versed on the history of it all; however I think you'll find that certain distributions use one versus another. AUbuntu uses apt, Angstrom uses opkg, and I believe that Debian uses something different. Further, the files which these package managers access some have different extensions and I don't know if package managers will transcend the various file types and interpret more than one.

My ignorance is also a bit due to the fact that I use the one that comes with the given distribution I'm using and I really only use two distributions, Ubuntu and MINT which are desktops. And then for custom distributions that I put on embedded boards, I try to build and install from source rather than use package management.

There's a forum thread/poll which asks "what's your favorite package manager?" and there's a bunch of discussion/preferences offered.

Note also that GIT is not a package manager, but instead a way to obtain code or files from another place such as a web server. Whatever the proper name, GIT is actually used to "get" code or other files, at least as far as I've used it. "git clone" is just git with a command intended to clone or copy files to your system from the remote server.

"apt-get install" installs a package. Dpkg along with proper commands also installs a package. However with those tools you can do or try things like "repair" "autoremove" "remove" "update" and so forth and they use repositories to perform their functions. The repositories are remove server locations, there's a default list, you can enhance that list by editing a certain local file and add or remove locations. Further I'm sure that file can also be updated by an actual update action when you issue one.

Pretty much all of those commands you issue with arguments and sub-commands to accomplish what you want.

That's a very broad summary, if you have more specific questions for instance an exact "Can I/Should I do something like ..." then please do write back. And hopefully if you want a general summary, those who have maybe stronger knowledge of the package management tools can also offer their thoughts.
 
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Old 10-22-2014, 02:04 PM   #3
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
Note also that GIT is not a package manager, but instead a way to obtain code or files from another place such as a web server. Whatever the proper name, GIT is actually used to "get" code or other files, at least as far as I've used it. "git clone" is just git with a command intended to clone or copy files to your system from the remote server.
Same with svn.

I've never heard of gem, so I can't comment on that.

For your specific list:
apt-get install - installs a package with its dependencies from a repository (either local, like the installation dvd, or remote, usually remote)

dpkg - installs a package file that you have downloaded onto your machine

svn/git - copy a program's source code from a remote machine to your local machine

The rough Windows "equivalents" of each of these would be:
apt-get/yum/zypper - like "Windows Update", if "Windows Update" let you install or remove packages in addition to updating them (and if "Windows Update" was capable of dealing with 3rd party programs, not just Windows programs).

dpkg/rpm - like double-clicking a Windows installation file you might download from a website

svn/cvs/git - like grabbing the source code for a program from an ftp site

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 10-22-2014 at 02:06 PM.
 
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Old 10-22-2014, 02:10 PM   #4
jkirchner
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Gem is to install Ruby Gems. See this page for more

Quote:
The RubyGems software allows you to easily download, install, and use ruby software packages on your system. The software package is called a "gem" and contains a package Ruby application or library.

Gems can be used to extend or modify functionality in Ruby applications. Commonly they're used to distribute reusable functionality that is shared with other Rubyists for use in their applications and libraries. Some gems provide command line utilities to help automate tasks and speed up your work.

Last edited by jkirchner; 10-22-2014 at 02:11 PM.
 
Old 10-22-2014, 02:21 PM   #5
suicidaleggroll
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Oh alright, so it's like Ruby's version of Python's PIP.
 
Old 10-24-2014, 12:35 AM   #6
hongman
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Thanks
 
Old 10-24-2014, 09:57 AM   #7
ilesterg
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yum! why hasn't anyone mentioned yum!



---------- Post added 10-24-14 at 09:57 PM ----------

also, Debian makes use of apt.
 
Old 10-24-2014, 10:02 AM   #8
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilesterg View Post
yum! why hasn't anyone mentioned yum!



---------- Post added 10-24-14 at 09:57 PM ----------

also, Debian makes use of apt.
Partly due to the OP's original post. They cited a mixture of commands, not all package management commands. But they did say "etc", just no one is yet offering added information. Perhaps they'll appreciate reading about yum. I've personally never used it. Feel free if you have the inclination to elaborate and at least I'll learn by way of reading the update.
 
Old 10-24-2014, 03:38 PM   #9
hongman
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Thanks for the info guys, just trying to get to grips with the world of nix
 
Old 10-24-2014, 08:56 PM   #10
Fred Caro
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A really basic explanation:

apt: (apt-get) (aptitude) Debian package manager for external originating (often net) packages

yum: Red Hat package manager (used on Fedora, etc) for same.
--------------------------------------------------------

dpkg: Debian package manager for packages already 'there' on system, might be used with .deb file.

rpm: Red Hat package manager for packages already 'there'.

for options try, for example, yum --help
or, apt-get --help

Fred.
 
  


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