LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-15-2007, 07:23 PM   #46
emoore
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 44

Rep: Reputation: 16

Quote:
Originally Posted by siawash
It also described my chipset as i440BX when I was under the notion my chipset is x86
You're confusing CPU type (x86) and chipsets (i440BX). x86 typically means the software was complied for 386's or better, while x64 means it was complied for AMD64 , Pentium D, Pentium Extreme Edition CPUs etc. Your distro doesn't care what chipset you use - its just a group of chips that are designed to work together, and are usually marketed as a single product.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_440BX
 
Old 10-15-2007, 07:52 PM   #47
AceofSpades19
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Chilliwack,BC.Canada
Distribution: Slackware64 -current
Posts: 2,079

Rep: Reputation: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by siawash View Post
Hi, I just received my live cd's.

Mint 3.0
PCLinux MiniME
Puppy 3.00
XBuntu
Slackware 12.0
OpenSUSE 10.2
SLAX

The only which ran in memory was SLAX, Puppy and PCLinux. It seems I don't have enough memory to run them live. XBuntu had a memory test which gave me the following error.

Failing address 000111da654
Bad 09080808
Error Bits 01000000
Count 1

None of the above with the exception of Puppy could recognise my mouse. I guess the main experimentation will start on Thursday when I will backup windows and start installing them onto hard drive.

It also described my chipset as i440BX when I was under the notion my chipset is x86...can anyone explain this anomaly? Does that mean I have chosed for the wrong chipset?
Slackware doesn't have a livecd that I know of
 
Old 10-15-2007, 08:14 PM   #48
Stildawn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Ok cool I also have a creative sound blaster card so it should work then.

Um which one of the peer to peer trading (downloading) programs have the fastest download speed (Ive heard from my brother that Linux downloads alot faster than Windows) and also have the largest user base lol.

As for the partion question, that sounds all good, I was just wondering if I had to make two sets of my Mp3s for windows and linux.

I think I might start with Mandriva as I wont have to set anything up to use 32 and 64bits. I will probably move onto others once Im familar with the basics. I can get any distro I want for 24 NZ dollars which is fine by me.
 
Old 10-15-2007, 09:23 PM   #49
oskar
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Austria
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.10
Posts: 1,142

Rep: Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stildawn View Post
Um which one of the peer to peer trading (downloading) programs have the fastest download speed (Ive heard from my brother that Linux downloads alot faster than Windows) and also have the largest user base lol.
aMule is good, it connects to the eDonkey network. The OS has nothing to do with the download speed.

Quote:
As for the partion question, that sounds all good, I was just wondering if I had to make two sets of my Mp3s for windows and linux.
No, you can access windows filesystems from linux.

Quote:
I think I might start with Mandriva as I wont have to set anything up to use 32 and 64bits. I will probably move onto others once Im familar with the basics. I can get any distro I want for 24 NZ dollars which is fine by me.
have fun.
 
Old 10-15-2007, 09:23 PM   #50
ehawk
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,257

Rep: Reputation: 48
While Slackware doesn't have a live-CD, slax is a slackware-based distro many people seem to like. I have not tried either it or Slackware.
 
Old 10-15-2007, 09:51 PM   #51
oskar
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Austria
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.10
Posts: 1,142

Rep: Reputation: 49
I just reread the OP, you said you want something similar to Adobe-Audition. If you want to record/sample/write music Mandriva is not the best choice. IMHO Ubuntu(Studio) is the best choice because it has a fully supported realtime-kernel in the repositories (which you need). A close second is Suse (JAD), and a close third is Fedora with CCRMA.
But all those projects DO NOT maintain 64 bit packages, because it would simply require too much manpower...
I still don't think a 64 bit distro is a good choice for a novice user... or most users really.

Last edited by oskar; 10-15-2007 at 10:01 PM.
 
Old 10-15-2007, 10:20 PM   #52
Mortosa
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: MIssouri
Distribution: Kubuntu, OpenSUSE
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
Opensuse 10.3 is really nice. It has alot of options. Its easy to use. It also has 1 click install of programs. I listen to MP3s, VPN to work, watch movies, all from my opensuse box. I do dual boot. I have win xp on 40gigs so I can game. The new opensuse is really nice. It has alot to offer
 
Old 10-15-2007, 10:35 PM   #53
imcal101
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
Smile Check out SuSE

The organization of the system the package updater etc..
 
Old 10-15-2007, 10:58 PM   #54
jay73
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Oskar, I'm not a specialist when it comes to such thing but I seem to remember that all Linux kernels starting with 2.6.18 are real-time by default while previous ones had explicitly to be patched with real-time support. But as I said, I've never needed any real-time kernel so that could well be a half-truth.

As for 32 versus 64 bit, that doesn't make any difference to me. I just think it's a pity to waste at least a gigabyte of RAM, especially since the applications in Ubuntu studio can be installed on Ubuntu 64 bit too - there's an "Ubuntu multimedia" item that includes all of them - and that there is (or was ?) a low-latency kernel for 64 bit too. Even Mandriva can install Rosegarden, Ardour, Hydrogen, etc.

Last edited by jay73; 10-15-2007 at 11:07 PM.
 
Old 10-16-2007, 06:17 AM   #55
oskar
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Austria
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.10
Posts: 1,142

Rep: Reputation: 49
No, I think they were real-time for some time during 2.4.
2.6 does have realtime or at least low latency processing, but only for root.

... Wow I read that ram comment, and checked the OP... you have 4 gig?! Alright, then you'd be wasting a gig of ram.
 
Old 10-16-2007, 07:52 AM   #56
siawash
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Zorin 6
Posts: 589

Rep: Reputation: 32
Memory

Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73 View Post
I don't know. What is it that you ordered? But maybe the chipset is simply identified by manufacturer/type rather than by architecture? There are a lot of x86 chips out there, you know.

If you receive indications that your memory may be faulty, download memtest and put it on a floppy. It is a very reliable application although it will take some time to complete its job. Don't take anything for granted because XP was doing fine. I ran a new computer with XP64 for three weeks and I didn't get any sign of hardware issues although I was getting more and more corrupt files. It's only when I installed Linux that I discovered that one of my sticks of RAM was (or had gone?) bad.

Wow, I am astonished to hear that. I was always under the notion that ram problems would manifest in windows. So what your saying is linux is more intolerant of any blemishes of this kind and therefore wont install?

Or some OS are more tolerant than others. LinuxPC and Puppy did manage install the GUI/I think KDE, albeit little else. I.e. just the desktop but it did't connect to the net. Mouse would't work, etc..

My hardware is dell latitude P3 650 Mhz, upgraded ram 512mb.

XBUNTU has a memory test on the boot menu. I aborted the test after finding the first fault as I did't have time. But will do the full test soon and let you know.

Last edited by siawash; 10-16-2007 at 07:54 AM.
 
Old 10-16-2007, 01:20 PM   #57
maury0324
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Florida
Distribution: Debian Squeeze amd_64
Posts: 66

Rep: Reputation: 16
Distros

The nice thing about Distros is that most come in Live CDs.
I suggest you download and burn several, many good ones have been posted here. You can run them from CD and test them out on your hardware. I'm sure you will find at least one that you will like.
 
Old 10-16-2007, 03:31 PM   #58
Stildawn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Lol cheers guys, Ive ordered Mandriva 2008, Ill try that for a wee while and see.. That multimedia ubruntu sounds good though I might try that when Ive taught myself more about linux.
 
Old 10-16-2007, 04:20 PM   #59
dcalki
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Florida panhandle, USA
Distribution: Working with PClinuxOS 2007 and Ubuntu 10.04 at the moment
Posts: 34

Rep: Reputation: 15
I recently switched to a dual boot linux system. As a newbie myself I found that PCLinuxOS (PCLOS) was close enough to being 'windows-like' for my tastes. The boot sequence is even sorta classy and not the typical endless scrolling of events for most linux boot up sequences.

Can't answer the really technical stuff but PCLOS can download and install Wine without any problems via the built in "application getter" (a true newbie - I don't know what it's called). Accessing the windows partitions is no problem.

You'll need to have at least 5Gb of unused space on your hard drive for the install. More is better.

Download the bootable CD version of the PCLOS code and burn it to disk. Then you can boot your machine from the CD into PCLOS and see what it looks like before deciding whether to install or not.

Other distros probably have bootable CD versions as well. It's a pretty handy way to see what the distro is like before going through all the headache of installing and resolving the snags that result.

Good Luck.
 
Old 10-17-2007, 10:28 AM   #60
amitabhishek
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Bombay, India
Distribution: Ubuntu (Hardy Heron)
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: 15
Get Linspire the most user friendly linux distro ever.However you will have to pay $50 for it . Peanuts to what you will pay Mr. Gates.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need help deciding on which distro - Currently have SUSE 10.2 jim.thornton Linux - Server 18 05-14-2007 01:22 PM
Need Help Deciding on a Distro Linux_n00b_57 Linux - Distributions 6 12-28-2006 10:39 PM
Need Help deciding on a distro Dralnu Linux - Distributions 10 05-11-2006 06:57 AM
deciding on distro suitable to me...need advice terry.trent Linux - Distributions 5 08-20-2004 10:15 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:36 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration