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Old 11-30-2004, 04:25 PM   #1
phoenix_wolf
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Question Debian


Greetings Fellow Linux users


I just earlier asked a question about Suse But I also went looking around the net to find what would be more suitable for me. I want to learn to program and I also want a very stable distro, from what I have read Red Hat is not at all the choice.

But now I found a site that gave me a quiz, http://brustracja.no-ip.org/linux/chooser.php?lang=en and that Debian is the first one I should try although I am still going to try Suse.

here is the question: I would like a bit of input on this distro and also which one of these do I dl save (non-US) I know I do not get that one but from 1-5 they are called boot. does this mean that they all are boot disk and I need to chose on of them pluss 6 and 7 or do I dl them all.

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 1 Generic boot (Non-US)

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 1 Generic boot (US)

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 2 'vanilla' boot

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 3 'compact' boot

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 4 'idepci' boot

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 5 'bf2.4' boot

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 6

Debian GNU/Linux - Disk 7
 
Old 11-30-2004, 04:44 PM   #2
mjrich
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If you have a good net connection, then I'd just download a copy of the new Sarge installer from http://www.debian.org/devel/debian-installer and then use apt-get to download each package as needed. It's simpler, cleaner and you'll end up with a more up-to-date system with less trouble, than starting with Woody, IMHO.

Cheers,

mj
 
Old 11-30-2004, 05:18 PM   #3
JTR
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Hi phoenix_wolf,

Debian Sarge is not a beginners Distro but still a good choice if you want to learn more about Linux.
If you want to know more about the different Debian CD's have a look at ->
http://www.debian.org/releases/stabl...ethods.en.html
Chapter 4.2.2. should explain what is one what CD and than you can decide.

greetings
jtr
 
Old 12-01-2004, 01:44 PM   #4
yiang
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hello

I also want to try debian but I was intimidated by having to download 7 discs. Having read http://www.debian.org/releases/stabl...ethods.en.html by posted by JTR, all I would need is the vanilla package right? Do I also need the generic boot disk 1 to boot off of of is vanilla enough?

thanks
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:07 PM   #5
darkleaf
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Disk 1 is enough but you'll need internet access after that to get more programs.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:21 PM   #6
DeadPenguin
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What if you have a horrible internet connection ? (28.8)

Which disks do I need for a full (dated) stable install?

Thanks for asking this question Pheonix-wolf.. I didn't understand the explanation on the debian download page.

Last edited by DeadPenguin; 12-01-2004 at 02:23 PM.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:27 PM   #7
comprookie2000
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The new net-installer works great,just follow the directions and set up apt,I don't use taskel or apptitude when it asks, I just reboot and apt-get install x-window-system, then whatever you want,but you need a fast connection as everything will be the latest and you will download all of it,apt does the rest. http://www.debian.org/devel/debian-installer/
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:28 PM   #8
mjrich
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With a slow net connection, disks aren't such a bad option

Depends a bit on what packages you want... disk 1 has everything needed for a simple install, with X, KDE and general workstation use. If you intend to run the odd server or two or more specialised software, then you'll need the whole set.

Cheers,

mj

Last edited by mjrich; 12-01-2004 at 02:29 PM.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:34 PM   #9
DeadPenguin
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Thank you for the fast reply.

I just want the minimum, so disk 1 will work..
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:44 PM   #10
PBSchmidt
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OK, to get things sorted out a bit:

- Trying the "stable" (Woody) branch, all you need is a pack of disks (for a quite basic system, 1-3 are a good start) and somehow an Internet connection to retreive security patches.

- Trying the "testing" branch, you sure want to have a better Internet connection - but there are daily changes, so the way I found out to be "it" is to get disk1 and do the rest via broadband. There are daily megs to get, remember, you are "testing"!

- Trying the "unstable" aka "sid" flavour requires the same as "testing" aka Sarge by powers of two. No Broadband? Don't try sid, you won't love it.

Sarge will be the next "stable" flavour soon (the default answer is, "when it's ready", but I expect it to be stable within some weeks or months), so what I write now is not applicable anymore when Sarge is in "stable" state.

Stable means, no changes in the combination of packages are made anymore, but not that the box behaves windowish and crashes;-)

BTW: Knoppix gives you a nice test drive of debian, so if not sure if it matches, get Knoppix first.

Another point: the first CDs are all bootable with different kernel "flavours": vanilla is the most stable, but also the most dumb one, for most PC hardware the "idepci" will give you a good rescue, and for the usual PC stuff, Disk1 gives you a state-of-the-art kernel with support for almost everything. bf24 is a 2.4 kernel used for booting.

Guess what the disks for "compact" is used for?;-)

So, if you get into trouble, there is/should always be a boot disk getting you out of the mess.

Having all disks, you have all the packages included in the distro. Having less than that, there are some packages missing. The Debian Guys made a great job putting the "important" and "usual" packages on the first disks, but, alas, if you want something special...

On the other hand, with a fast Internet connection, Debian is absolutely fantastic: Looking for a pack / a command? apt-cache search gives you the name, apt-get install gets it into your box, resolving all the library and version tweedeldees by itself that costed some good men the best of their nights ;-)

I hope that I put a little light on some things.

HTH, Peter

Last edited by PBSchmidt; 12-01-2004 at 02:48 PM.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 02:57 PM   #11
yiang
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Disk 1? So do you suggest trying out the General Boot then? I was downloading the vanilla but just canceled it.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 03:06 PM   #12
PBSchmidt
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definitly disk 1 to start. The other boot options are merely meant as troubleshooters.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 09:38 PM   #13
DeadPenguin
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Thanks PB.
Makes sense now.
 
Old 12-01-2004, 11:01 PM   #14
phoenix_wolf
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Thank you all this has been very helpfull
 
Old 12-02-2004, 08:36 AM   #15
darkleaf
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Another thing if you have a wireless network install with the 2.4 kernel saves you some trouble recompiling it at the start to get it working. This might also help for new hardware cause the woody kernel is pretty old.
 
  


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