LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-04-2004, 01:30 PM   #1
nagromo
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Minnesota, USA
Distribution: Debian, Mepis
Posts: 65

Rep: Reputation: 15
Creating a FAT partition


What is the command to create a fat filesystem? I currently have an unused ReiserFS partition that I want to use for sharing between Windows and Linux. Is there a command that would just write over an existing partition with an empty fat partition? I can't do it from Windows because Windows no longer detects my linux partitions.

I have tried various obvious ones (to me) and searched google, but I can't find the command.
 
Old 09-04-2004, 01:51 PM   #2
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
You need to make the filesystem with "mkfs":
mkfs -t vfat -F 32 /dev/hdxY
 
Old 09-04-2004, 01:53 PM   #3
bruno buys
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Rio
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,509

Rep: Reputation: 46
mkdosfs -F 32

or

mkfs

man:mkfs and man:mkdosfs to know more.
 
Old 09-04-2004, 09:32 PM   #4
nagromo
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Minnesota, USA
Distribution: Debian, Mepis
Posts: 65

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks; that worked. I have two problems, though.

1. Windows doesn't detect the partition (It didn't before, either). My Computer has A:, C: (Windows), then H: and I: (CD and DVD). There are three partitions in between that were created from the Windows installer but overwriten numerous times by various flavors of Linux. I don't know how to get Windows to see the second partition again.

2. I put the new fat partition in /etc/fstab (Debian) with the default mounting options. How can I allow all users to access a partition in /etc/fstab?
 
Old 09-05-2004, 12:12 AM   #5
bruno buys
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Rio
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,509

Rep: Reputation: 46
If your windows is xp or 2k, I guess there is a tool to manage disks and parts, in the system admin section. Right click "MyComputer" icon, and choose "Manage".



2. I put the new fat partition in /etc/fstab (Debian) with the default mounting options. How can I allow all users to access a partition in /etc/fstab?

You have to add the "user" option in the line regarding this partition. The "default" option won't let users write to it.
 
Old 09-05-2004, 01:13 AM   #6
nagromo
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Minnesota, USA
Distribution: Debian, Mepis
Posts: 65

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Is it OK to put default,user? If not, what other important options from default should I add?
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FAT partition problem Mickaletto Linux - Newbie 6 11-26-2005 02:43 PM
Linux on a FAT partition? ninjabob7 Linux - General 5 11-12-2005 04:14 PM
FAT or NTFS partition metallicafan_316 Linux - Newbie 5 08-29-2005 01:03 AM
Can't get at FAT partition Boffy Linux - General 5 02-21-2005 12:27 PM
Writing to my fat partition fuzzai Linux - General 6 04-20-2004 11:31 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration