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Old 08-18-2005, 12:54 PM   #16
Superion
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ynot Irucrem
Superion, sounds like you've definitely got what it takes to learn linux (you know what a start button is), it's just that it might not completely fulfill your needs. You should definitely keep your windows partition around until you are absolutely sure everything is working fine...
If you have any problems, just post 'em on LQ.
I agree, Ynot. Here's my current plan:

1) Download Mepis and Experiment with it in Live CD mode. Mepis is the distribution I've chosen to test and install, primarily because of its recommendations and because it can be run as a live CD, so I have a chance to try it out first. If all goes well and I fall in love with it:

2) Install it on my storage (slowest) computer on my network. There isn't anything critical on that computer yet, so hopefully I'll get a chance to experiment with creating a dual-boot AND Linux-only environment. Then I'll play around with it some more. If, after the honeymoon period (assuming there is one ) I still love it, then:

3) Install Mepis on storage computer as Linux-only; install it as a dual-boot system on the Main computer. The Main computer in my network has the most power, and if there are any Windows Apps and/or Games that I HAVE to have, I can run them on that machine. *dryly* I may need a larger hard-drive.

The only question mark is the mobile/laptop. Even if my best scenario goes well, I'm not quite sure what to load on that. Since I do a lot of work away from home on that thing (on Windows apps), it would seem that dual-booting would be necessary...it's just that I don't see that as being a practical solution for a laptop!

Also, I don't think anyone quite answered my question about the different file systems: Will I be able to take a disk that Linux has saved a (Windows-compatible) file to, and put that disk in a Windows machine and access the file?

Oh, and one more question: What are some primary differences between the GUI overlays KDE and GNOME? I've read a couple of articles, but they seemed rather vague (I probably didn't read the right ones). For starters, I'd like something with smaller, well-defined icons (yes, kind of like Windows... ) but that I can tweak and make into what I'd like.

THANKS!

Last edited by Superion; 08-18-2005 at 12:57 PM.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 03:09 PM   #17
volvogga
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Laptops are a whole new animal to deal with, as they often have new and/or obscure hardware. If you decide to consider putting Linux on your laptop, do a search and see if anyone else has got Linux running on your Laptop (same make and model, with as close to your exact hardware as possible), and to what degree of success (for example, sometimes it reads like "everything works, but the cardbus controller is still not supported"), before you do anything. This is a good place to start looking....

http://www.linux-laptop.net/

As far as file systems go, Linux uses several file systems for hard disk storage. The main file system that it has trouble with, as far as I know, is NTFS. For floppys, you can use standard FAT (IBM PC formated) or format them as ext2. Stick with FAT and you should be good to go as far as going from Linux to Win machines goes. Other than that, CD-ROMs should still be identical file formats for both OS's, as well as memory keys (although I don't know anything about these other than they use flash ROM, I have never run across any complaints about going from one system to another).

Hope that clears up a few things. Whatever you decide, good luck. Like I said, its your computer(s), not ours.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 03:37 PM   #18
Ynot Irucrem
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for floppies and usb disks, use fat32.

for cdroms, windows and linux use the ISO9660 filesystem standard, which is very limited - it only supports 8.3 filenames, 8 levels of directories, and no file ownership. windows supports it's own extension to the ISO9660 standard called Joliet which allows long filenames. linux supports joliet as well as its own extension called Rock-Ridge, which allow long filenames, unix permissions, symbolic links, and probably other stuff. both the extensions are ignored by systems which cant understand them e.g. if you read a rock-ridge cd in DOS it will just look like a normal ISO9660 cd. that was probably more info than you needed, but anyway... just use the default settings on your burning program and you'll be fine.

Quote:
differences between the GUI overlays KDE and GNOME?
first of all, KDE and GNOME aren't the only Window Managers (GUIs), there's a heap more that you'll want to look into if you've got an old machine (because KDE and GNOME have the most features, they're the slowest).

With KDE, everything is integrated - the file browser is the web browser and the K team seem to want to make their own version of every program on Earth, rename it so it starts with K, and integrate it into KDE.
It's probably more configurable than GNOME. KDE needs more memory and a faster CPU than GNOME.

A lot of programs use the GNOME and GTK+ libraries (as opposed to Qt, the KDE library - Off the top of my head I can only think of two programs that use Qt), so you'll probably need them installed anyway even if you don't use GNOME. that's all I can think of, sorry.

for more info, the websites are kde.org and gnome.org
 
Old 08-18-2005, 03:48 PM   #19
boxerboy
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i think of KDE as more of a windows desktop and i hate saying that due to fact that linux is nothing like windows. but thats (by glance) what it reminds me of. i just installed XFCE and i love it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! but i havent had time to play with it much. as for gnome it takes getting used to from windows to gnome i mean.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 03:58 PM   #20
IsaacKuo
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Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
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Quote:
Originally posted by Superion

2) Install it on my storage (slowest) computer on my network. There isn't anything critical on that computer yet, so hopefully I'll get a chance to experiment with creating a dual-boot AND Linux-only environment.
I also recommend Mepis, but with one caveat. If your storage computer has less than 160megs of RAM, upgrade it to 192+megs of RAM before trying to run Mepis on it. Mepis will thrash and thrash with 128megs of RAM, and will just choke with less than that.

With multiple computers, I think you'll find running a mix of pure Windows and pure Linux computers more convenient than dual booting. You can even use vnc to remotely run Linux and/or share desktops so you can simultaneously use both on the same screen.

In your situation, my basic strategy would be to use Windows less and less, one application at a time. This eventually leaves me using a "lean and mean" stripped down Windows set up with a minimum of Windows-only applications (just games and some work related apps, probably). With a minimum number of applications running around in Windows, this minimizes the chances of annoying-Windows-stuff happening.

On my own home network, I have a total of 6 computers. Five of them are pure Debian Linux; one of them is pure Windows XP. Honestly, I hardly ever turn on the Windows computer, but it's nice to know it's there if I ever want to use it.

For you, I think the ideal mix would be at least 3 computers: One Windows computer purely for games (fastest), one Windows computer purely for work related Windows only applications (slowest), and one Linux computer for most everyday use (medium). You can use vnc to remotely use the slow Windows desktop from the Linux computer.
 
Old 08-18-2005, 04:10 PM   #21
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally posted by Superion
Oh, and one more question: What are some primary differences between the GUI overlays KDE and GNOME?
Oh, don't worry too much about the differences between KDE and GNOME for right now. You're starting out with Mepis, which only gives you one choice by default--KDE. IMHO, the default Mepis setup is ugly, but it's easy to change (KDE comes with myriad styles and icon sets and window decorations).
 
Old 08-18-2005, 05:09 PM   #22
Superion
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Wow, everyone; thanks for all the advice!

Quote:
Originally posted by IsaacKuo
I also recommend Mepis, but with one caveat. If your storage computer has less than 160megs of RAM, upgrade it to 192+megs of RAM before trying to run Mepis on it. Mepis will thrash and thrash with 128megs of RAM, and will just choke with less than that.
That MAY be a problem...I'll have to check. One odd thing I've noticed is that with Linux, most people inquire about available memory, as opposed to available hard drive space...it seems that memory is a more critical factor in Linux. Is that true?

Unfortunately, having a "pure" Linux computer may not be possible on the Main computer, simply because it's the fastest. I'm sure it'll have to be dual-bootable...at the very least, to play Windows games...and that's assuming I find viable alternatives in Linux to the other programs I use. I'll admit, though, that the replacement-app situation looks hopeful (I checked a "conversion" table someone here gave me ). I have to look at that multi-track audio-editor and Linux's Illustrator-competitor; I think those are gonna be critical for me.

Quote:
Originally posted by IsaacKuo In your situation, my basic strategy would be to use Windows less and less, one application at a time. This eventually leaves me using a "lean and mean" stripped down Windows set up with a minimum of Windows-only applications (just games and some work related apps, probably).
Agreed. I'm pretty realistic; I think that if I can wean myself off of Windows for 65-70% of the stuff I do, that'll be pretty darn good. Plus, I'll have more control over my own destiny, instead of Microsoft.

Quote:
Originally posted by IsaacKuo For you, I think the ideal mix would be at least 3 computers: One Windows computer purely for games (fastest), one Windows computer purely for work related Windows only applications (slowest), and one Linux computer for most everyday use (medium). You can use vnc to remotely use the slow Windows desktop from the Linux computer.
Hmmm...because of the hardware I have - One fast PC, one Slower PC, and a mobile - I'll prolly have to take a different approach. So assuming I fall in love with Mepis/Linux, I'm thinking:

Main (fastest) computer - Dual Bootable; Use the Windows-OS for work-related-apps and Windows Games...and I'll want to have Linux on there because, well, heck, it's the best computer!
Storage "repository" (slowest) - Linux only, once I get used to it (in the beginning I'll probably play with this machine to make sure I can make it dual bootable).
Laptop - Who knows? The sad thing is that I may have to make that dual-bootable, too. But for now, I can afford to cross that bridge later, when I get to it.

For now, I'm just waiting on that Mepis Download (I had to set my computer to do it before I left the house this morning; hopefully all went well...that's a LARGE file). In the meantime, I'm diving into a book on Linux command-line syntax and all that good stuff. This is where DOS both helps and hurts me: I'm no stranger to CLI, but by the same token Linux's screens and prompts are rather strange and cryptic to me. Some of the commands I actually recognize (ls, cd, etc)... THAT'S a scary thought. But I'm already having all kinds of dreams about how I want to create/configure my desktop (probably none of them possible). Oh, well...

Thanks again!
 
Old 11-20-2005, 11:11 PM   #23
GNewbie
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Quote:
Originally posted by Superion
Wow, everyone; thanks for all the advice!



That MAY be a problem...I'll have to check. One odd thing I've noticed is that with Linux, most people inquire about available memory, as opposed to available hard drive space...it seems that memory is a more critical factor in Linux. Is that true?

Unfortunately, having a "pure" Linux computer may not be possible on the Main computer, simply because it's the fastest. I'm sure it'll have to be dual-bootable...at the very least, to play Windows games...and that's assuming I find viable alternatives in Linux to the other programs I use. I'll admit, though, that the replacement-app situation looks hopeful (I checked a "conversion" table someone here gave me ). I have to look at that multi-track audio-editor and Linux's Illustrator-competitor; I think those are gonna be critical for me.



Agreed. I'm pretty realistic; I think that if I can wean myself off of Windows for 65-70% of the stuff I do, that'll be pretty darn good. Plus, I'll have more control over my own destiny, instead of Microsoft.



Hmmm...because of the hardware I have - One fast PC, one Slower PC, and a mobile - I'll prolly have to take a different approach. So assuming I fall in love with Mepis/Linux, I'm thinking:

Main (fastest) computer - Dual Bootable; Use the Windows-OS for work-related-apps and Windows Games...and I'll want to have Linux on there because, well, heck, it's the best computer!
Storage "repository" (slowest) - Linux only, once I get used to it (in the beginning I'll probably play with this machine to make sure I can make it dual bootable).
Laptop - Who knows? The sad thing is that I may have to make that dual-bootable, too. But for now, I can afford to cross that bridge later, when I get to it.

For now, I'm just waiting on that Mepis Download (I had to set my computer to do it before I left the house this morning; hopefully all went well...that's a LARGE file). In the meantime, I'm diving into a book on Linux command-line syntax and all that good stuff. This is where DOS both helps and hurts me: I'm no stranger to CLI, but by the same token Linux's screens and prompts are rather strange and cryptic to me. Some of the commands I actually recognize (ls, cd, etc)... THAT'S a scary thought. But I'm already having all kinds of dreams about how I want to create/configure my desktop (probably none of them possible). Oh, well...

Thanks again!
i just installed mepis as a dual boot on my home computer. my situation was a bit complex, but you may want to look at installing a second hard drive and installing mepis on that. ram is cheap, so get a little extra - it helps all computers.

if you have an oldie but a goodie computer, you can try dsl - d*mn small linux. it is also debian based, but it is < 50 mb total and is optimized to run on sarn small hardware specs. since it is debian, it has synaptic (gui package manager).

dual boots are no big deal as long as you know what you are doing (take some time and do some research).

visit

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...61#post1879861

and read the author's instructions to dual boot without messing with the primary partition's MBR (master boot record). don't worry, i didn't know what an MBR was as of a few days ago. ;-)

if qtparted kicks an error when you resize your partition (after running scandisk, defrag and backing it up TWICE!), you can use ranish partition manager from the ultimate boot cd. if you have this problem, let me know.

as for wireless access, the solution is to cozy up to ndwrapper and another program (can't recall the name) that enables wpa security or pick up a wireless b/g network bridge (some can network with usb printers). the latter is easy (just plug in the ethernet cable and configure the bridge to talk to the router), but will set you back about $50-$100.

also, rather than say, "i need to play my windows games," why don't you say, "why don't i find equal or better linux games and forget about the windows games"? if you can't find any equivalents to a particular, stick to the windows version, but if you can, ditch the windows game.

as for cross compatibility, you can send out pdf files - everyone can open them. you can install openoffice.org on you coworker's computers for free. maybe they'll benefit from learning about OSS and ditching msft, too. you could always save as .dco, .xls, etc and it will likely display fine as long as you don't dig into the exotic features.

if you *really* use illustrator, there is nothing in linux that can compare. it is an industry leader at what it does. if you just play around with it, there are alternatives, though.

good luck.
 
  


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