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Old 11-17-2009, 04:21 PM   #16
kbp
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Distro choice is not really a 'functionality' question as most will offer the same features, the general process is as follows:

- install the base system only, no gui or extra package groups
- once install is complete, run through the list of installed packages and remove any that you don't require

RHEL/CentOS example (remove ones tagged with '-'):
Code:
%packages
@base
postfix
screen
sharutils
rsyslog
-bluez-gnome
-bluez-libs
-bluez-utils
-crash
-Deployment_Guide-en-US
-dhcpv6_client
-finger
-firstboot-tui
-system-config-securitylevel-tui
-irda-utils
-nc
-lftp
-nano
-NetworkManager
-pcmciautils
-rdate
-rsh
-rdist
-rp-pppoe
-sendmail
-smartmontools
-sysklogd
-system-config-network-tui
-talk
-wpa_supplicant
- add any packages you need for the specific role of the server eg. dhcp
- perform base hardening plus any configuration/hardening relevant to the server role
- configure iptables with a restrictive policy, only allowing what is required for the desired functionality

Eg.
Code:
cat << EOF > /etc/sysconfig/iptables
*filter
:INPUT DROP [0:0]
:FORWARD DROP [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [1059:101844]
-A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type destination-unreachable -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type time-exceeded -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 25 -j ACCEPT
COMMIT
EOF
.. and Bob's your relative of choice

hth

Last edited by kbp; 11-17-2009 at 04:30 PM.
 
Old 11-17-2009, 06:41 PM   #17
dvdljns
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Ok I installed vbox and am going to go with fc3 server install. Hope thats a flavor you know about.
 
Old 11-17-2009, 08:56 PM   #18
chrism01
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Fedora Core 3 is waaaay out of date. Do yourself & the rest of the net a favour and get an up to date distro eg Centos 5.4 (free ver of RHEL).
 
Old 11-18-2009, 09:45 AM   #19
dvdljns
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Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
Fedora Core 3 is waaaay out of date. Do yourself & the rest of the net a favour and get an up to date distro eg Centos 5.4 (free ver of RHEL).
It does not matter right now. I can not install anything untill I get more mem.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 09:43 AM   #20
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Ok I switched this over to the xp machine. disconnected the drive that was in it and put in a 80 gig drive through on win2k, but I formatted it using ntfs and linux keeps insisting it needs to partition the hold drive. Do I need to partition this drive. should I back up and partition it 32 instead of ntfs.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 12:13 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvdljns View Post
Ok I switched this over to the xp machine. disconnected the drive that was in it and put in a 80 gig drive through on win2k, but I formatted it using ntfs and linux keeps insisting it needs to partition the hold drive. Do I need to partition this drive. should I back up and partition it 32 instead of ntfs.
Terminology:

Host OS - The OS (Windows XP) running VirtualBox, I.E. the real OS
Guest OS - The OS running inside a virtual machine (Linux)
Virtual Disk - A file containing data that appears as a virtual disk drive
Virtual Machine - Either the window or the settings/configuration for one virtual environment
Shared Folders - Folders on the Host OS that (can) appear as folders in the Guest OS

If you are using VirtualBox here is the way that you install Linux from a boot CD.
  • Install VirtualBox software
  • Create a virtual disk in VirtualBox
  • Create a virtual machine in VirtualBox
  • Set the virtual machine CD drive to map to your real CD drive
  • Put the Linux CD in the real CD drive
  • Start the virtual machine
  • Install Linux inside the virtual machine
  • Install the VirtualBox Guest Additions

A virtual disk consists of a file on windows XP. When you create the virtual disk you can specify where it should be stored. For example, you can store the virtual disk file on the external 80 GB drive. The format of the file system used to store the virtual disk does not matter. It can be NTFS or any other Windows XP file system. The initial contents of the virtual disk will be empty. You put things in the virtual disk from inside the virtual machine just like it was storing to a real disk drive. Anything written to the virtual drive (from inside the virtual machine) goes into the virtual disk file.

You can create an expanding virtual disk with a size limit that grows as you write more sectors. You can create a fixed-size virtual disk that allocates the entire space required and the maximum size file. You can create a read-only virtual disk and a "differences" disk to save just changes.

When you create a virtual machine, you will be asked if you want to create a virtual disk, or what existing virtual disk you want to use. You can either create the virtual disk ahead of time or during the creation of your virtual machine. If you want to create the virtual disk after creating the virtual machine then set the machine to use no virtual disk. You can always change which virtual disks are used by a virtual machine in the settings.

When you first boot a virtual machine the virtual disk is empty. The virtual BIOS will boot from the virtual CD (if available) or report an error similar to "no operating system found". Either map the virtual CD drive to a real CD drive before starting the virtual machine, or reset the virtual machine after mapping the virtual CD drive to your installation CD. You can map the virtual CD drive to an actual CD drive in the hardware or you can map it to an ISO image file. Using an ISO image file avoids having to burn a CD and tie up your real CD drive. Reading from an ISO image is also faster than reading from a real CD drive.

When the Linux CD boots inside the virtual machine it will "see" a normal PC with an empty hard disk. Tell the Linux installer to format the hard disk using ext2, ext3, reiser, or whatever you want. It will format the inside of the virtual disk file and NOT your real hard disk containing XP.

These are the usual device names seen inside a virtual machine.

/dev/hda - First (boot) hard disk (mapped to virtual disk)
/dev/hdb - Second hard disk (usually not present)
/dev/hdc - Virtual CD/DVD drive (mapped to nothing, ISO or real drive)

You can map more than two virtual disks if you want.

Install the guest additions for VirtualBox after installing Linux. That provides support for mapping real Windows XP folders, mouse pointer tracking, automatic display resizing, clipboard and seamless (combined desktop) mode.

How do you get files into the virtual hard disk? There are a number of ways, but you have to think of the virtual machine like it is a real (separate) computer from your normal Windows XP host computer running VirtualBox.
  • Shared folders can be mounted to mount points
  • Windows network shares can be accessed with SMB
  • You can access files using NFS
  • You can use FTP
  • Temporarily map other virtual disks and copy files

VirtualBox guest additions provides a "vboxsf" file system driver that you can use to mount shared folders. Set the shared folders for the virtual machine settings before or during use of the virtual machine. It's one of the few things you can change while a virtual machine is running. Mount the shared folders inside the virtual machine using the normal "mount" command. You can put the mount commands in "/etc/fstab" if you like.

mount -t vboxsf sharename /mnt/mountpoint

Replace "sharename" with the share name used in the virtual machine settings. Replace "/mnt/mountpoint" with the mount point where you want to see the folder in Linux. Just like normal mount points you can mount shared folders anywhere in the Linux file system.

You can access Windows network shares (shared folders) in the normal way. If you're using a NAT virtual network interface, either add the computer names to "/etc/hosts" or use the IP addresses rather than the computer names. NetBIOS name service (for Windows) does not work through NAT. A bridged virtual network interface (going directly to your LAN) will allow full use of Windows file sharing including NetBIOS name service.

In case you haven't used Linux SMB there are a few ways to access files.
  • Inside a GUI folder window "smb://computer/share"
  • Mount an SMB share using "mount -t smbfs"
  • SMB Client "smbclient" (similar to FTP) from a command shell

The "computer" name is translated to an IP address using NetBIOS over TCP/IP (non-NAT configuration), the "/etc/hosts" file, a Domain Name Server (DNS) or Windows Internet Name Service (WINS). Or you can just type the IP address in place of the computer name. The "share" name is whatever you have set on the machine sharing the folder. If it contains spaces, don't forget to use quotes around it or backslashes in front of the spaces. That normally isn't necessary in GUI folder windows.

I don't use NFS or FTP very much but they work normally in a virtual machine just like the would from a separate computer. You can access files on your "host OS" of Windows XP just as if it was a different computer from the virtual machine.

If the files you want to copy are in a virtual disk assigned to some other virtual machine you can temporarily attach the virtual disk to a different virtual machine, boot the virtual OS and copy the files like for a normal disk drive.

VirtualBox supports virtual USB devices. You can map any real USB device not otherwise in use by the OS to a virtual USB device. You have to have a Linux driver for the real USB device. That is not required to access external USB disks since you can mount them normally in Windows XP and then map folders or the entire drive to a shared folder. To do "raw" access to an external USB disk you can map it as a virtual USB device. Virtual USB devices are helpful for other kinds of devices like USB serial adapters, USB modems, USB network adapters, etc. Network adapters are also supported as virtual Ethernet ports. The main reason to use a virtual USB network adapter is for hacking/snooping in promiscuous mode.

VirtualBox also supports virtual serial ports that can be mapped to real XP serial ports or operating system pipes from Windows XP programs. I've had limited success with this feature and it doesn't seem to work as well for really high speed serial communication.

There are a number of ways to back up a virtual disk. You can simply copy the virtual disk file (when the machine is not running). You can use a normal Linux backup program from inside the virtual machine. You can temporarily mount the virtual disk on some other virtual machine that has a different OS containing the backup software you want. You can copy individual folders or files in the ways I described and store them on the host XP OS or some other computer.

There is a command line utility called "vboxmanage" that you can use to do other things for VirtualBox such as clone hard disks (assigning a unique GUID), create special kinds of disks, start virtual machines, etc. I create shortcuts for my frequently used virtual machines.

"C:\Program Files\Sun\VirtualBox\VBoxManage.exe" startvm 4fa6945c-1ee7-49cd-b869-e003ec04c3df"

The above command starts the virtual machine with the specified GUID. You can get the GUID from the virtual machine XML settings file. The GUID never changes. You can use a name instead of a GUID but you will have to change the shortcut if you ever change the machine name.

The rest of the features of VirtualBox are covered pretty well by the documentation. Look in the user forums on the web site for more information. I've found VirtualBox to be a very useful program although it isn't perfect. I recommend that you hang onto copies of versions that work well for you because newer versions tend to introduce bugs and not all versions are as good as others.

If you are going to update the VirtualBox software, back up your virtual machine XML settings files and VirtualBox settings XML file first. You don't usually need to back up your virtual disk files. If the new version of VirtualBox converts the XML files to a new format then you can still go back to the previous version using the backup XML files you saved. Always reboot the host OS after un-installing or installing VirtualBox even if it does not ask you. Some programs such as anti-virus behave badly due to the changes in network devices or drivers. In many cases you can get away without rebooting but I've run into a few problems that varied from non-functional network drivers to BSODs.

DO NOT copy virtual disk files between different kinds of operating systems. Although copying a virtual disk from Linux (for use with Windows VirtualBox) will often work, I have had problems. Do not attempt to have both Windows VirtualBox and Linux VirtualBox box share the same virtual disk files. Keep a separate copy of virtual disk files for a Linux host OS versus a Windows host OS. If you must copy a virtual disk file between types of operating systems do it only once, and not repeatedly. The problems I have encountered are most likely a bug and they don't always happen. Fixed size virtual disk images also (so far) have not been a problem.

You CAN safely copy virtual disk files to other computers providing that they use the same kind of VirtualBox host OS (Windows versus Linux). The virtual disk file format is intended to be cross-platform compatible and it mostly is with the exception of different VirtualBox host operating systems. I've done this many times and never had a problem.

Remember that you can use any of your usual boot CDs (or ISO images of them) from inside a virtual machine just like on a normal computer. To install or repair Linux and Windows inside a virtual machine, map the boot disk to the virtual CD drive and boot it. I keep a couple of ISO images handy such as a BartPE XP boot CD and Paragon Hard Disk Backup boot CD. I also have copies of my OS installation CDs as ISO images. If you're short on hard disk space you can just use normal CDs and put them in the real CD drive. Then map the virtual CD drive to the real CD drive.

Last edited by Erik_FL; 11-19-2009 at 12:27 PM.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 12:58 PM   #22
dvdljns
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Question

Ok Got it figured out but it will not setup my monitor,graphics card or usb wireless card. what do I do for trouble shooting. This should use the connection formed by windows right.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 02:39 PM   #23
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VirtualBox Networking

Get everything working first in Windows XP (or whatever host OS you use) before you try to make it work from a virtual machine.

Windows XP has a "Wireless LAN" connection in the connections folder. If you don't see that then the Windows XP device driver for the wireless adapter is not installed.

Double check that the wireless adapter appears in the Windows Device Manager. It may be under "Unknown devices" or some other category in the Device Manager. Right click the device to get a menu that includes the settings (properties) and commands to install a driver.

When the "Wireless LAN" connection is present in the Connections folder you can right click the icon to get a list of detected wireless networks. Select the network you want to use, and click the button to connect. Select the correct type of encryption if it isn't detected automatically, then enter your pass phrase or key. Choose the option to connect automatically and that will add the name to the preferred wireless networks. Later you can make changes by opening the list of preferred wireless networks. Among other things you can choose the networks to be automatically connected, and the precedence (order) in the list.

Verify that you can access the Internet from Windows XP through the wireless network adapter.

Windows XP "sees" all wireless networks on one wireless adapter through one Wireless LAN connection in the Connections folder. You will not see a separate connection for each available wireless network. You will see a separate connection for each wireless (and wired) adapter on the Windows XP computer. Most people just see one Wireless LAN connection because they have one wireless adapter. The Wireless LAN connection is useless unless the associated adapter has detected and connected to some wireless network. You connect wireless networks manually using the list of detected networks (for the connection) or due to automatic connection with one of the networks in the preferred wireless network list (for the connection). Until you configure (or connect) at least one wireless network a Wireless LAN connection will be useless.

To access a wired or wireless adapter (or both) you can add a virtual network adapter in the settings for a virtual machine. All Host (Windows XP) network adapters are treated the same. Here are the different kinds of virtual network adapters (seen by the virtual OS).
  • Not attached - Send discarded, nothing received
  • NAT - Address 10.0.2.nnn able to access all host IP networks
  • Bridged Adapter - Appears on LAN as another computer
  • Internal Network - Talks only to other VM's using "internal network"
  • Host Only Adapter - Appears as another Ethernet interface (connection) on the XP Host OS

In addition to the above you have a choice of which network hardware the virtual machine "sees". The virtual network hardware can appear to be either an AMD or Intel adapter. You need the correct driver in the guest (virtual) OS.

When you use NAT, the virtual machine requests an IP address using DHCP and the address is assigned by VirtualBox NAT as if the virtual machine was connected to a router (VirtualBox). VirtualBox NAT responds by assigning an address in the 10.0.2.nnn range and then does the translation between that and the real IP addresses used for the real network. In essence VirtualBox NAT is assocated (in the host OS) with ALL network adapters and can talk to everything that the host OS can. What doesn't work is some of Microsoft Networking such as NetBIOS name service. Use IP addresses to access Microsoft Network shares or add the computer names to the "/etc/hosts" file in Linux.

You can have one virtual machine with one Bridged Adapter running at any given time. Although you can define more they don't seem to work and get an error (probably a bug). A Bridged Adapter goes directly to the Host OS Ethernet adapter (LAN connection) that you select. The virtual machine appears on the LAN as if it was another computer with a network adapter of its own and an Ethernet MAC address. When the virtual machine requests an address with DHCP your normal broadband router assigns the address. If you have no DHCP server on your LAN then you need to set a correct address manually. For example, if your LAN uses 192.168.1.nnn then DHCP (or you) will assign an address such as 192.168.1.50.

The "Internal Network" goes to nothing else except other virtual machines using an "Interneal Network" interface. It works like the virtual machines were connected to each other but not to the host OS or LAN.

A Host Only Adapter provides an additional Ethernet adapter (connection) in the Host OS. Only the Host OS can communicate with the virtual machine unless you bridge the Host OS connection (in Windows XP) to some other Host adapter (connection).

Here are some suggestions about when to use a particular kind of virtual network adapter.

If your virtual machine mostly accesses Internet and does not frequently access Microsoft Network shares then a NAT adapter provides the best security. For frequent Microsoft Network share access you will probably want to define the computers in the "/etc/hosts" file. Alternatively you can type in IP addresses instead of computer names.

If you have one virtual machine that needs to access Microsoft Network shares and Internet through one Host OS adapter (connection) then a Bridged Adapter works well. For example, you can use a Bridged Adapter and select the Wireless LAN connection for the associated Host OS adapter. The virtual machine will not be able to access other Host OS network adapters but it will be able to access the Host. For example a Bridged Adapter associated with the wireless connection would not be able to access computers on the wired LAN unless you did additional bridging or routing in the Host OS.

If you just want the virtual machine to be able to communicate with some other virtual machine (and nothing else) then you can define an Internal Network adapter. VirtualBox provides no DHCP server or translation. Either assign IP addresses manually or use the automatic default IP addresses such as 169.254.nnn.nnn assgned by Windows / Linux. Since it is a separate LAN you can use any IP addressing scheme you like as long as all the virtual machines follow it.

The Host Only Adapter is the most versatile. If the situation isn't covered by what I just described you can usually do it using a Host Only Adapter and some bridging or configuration in the OS. If you un-check all the protocols for a Host Only Adapter connection in Windows XP then Windows XP will only communicate using Ethernet frames. That isn't much use unless you also bridge the Host Only Adapter to some other connection.

If you enable IP or other protocols and services on the Host Only Adapter in Windows XP then the host will be able to use those to communicate to the virtual machine. Except for any host routing or bridging that you do, ONLY the Host OS will be able to communicate with the virtual machine.

To get Microsoft Networking to operate completely on multiple Host network interfaces (connections) you have to define a Host Only Adapter, and then bridge that Host Only Adapter to ALL the other LAN connections in the Host OS. NOTE: That also bridges the LANs together on the real network and makes them like ONE single LAN.

Microsoft NetBIOS Name Service and the Microsoft Network Browser (My Network Places) only works for computers on the same LAN in the same IP subnetwork. You can always access other computers using their IP address even if the name isn't recognized or the computers don't appear in the list of detected computers "seen" by the virtual machine. In other words, the SMB part of Microsoft Networking does work across multiple LANs and IP sub-networks providing that there is a communication path and you use the correct IP address instead of the computer name.

The limitations on Microsoft Networking are due to the design of the protocols and not because of missing features in VirtualBox. You can work around the limitations by various methods including adding the computers to the "/etc/hosts" file. The Network Browse list is harder to support across networks but you can do things like forwarding broacasts to UDP port 138 or use the LMHOSTS file to additional computers keeping a list of servers. Usually I don't bother with anything except adding machines to the hosts file or I use the Bridged Adapter or Host Only Adapter to avoid the problem.

If you explain in more detail what you want to do with your network then I will be happy to suggest a configuration for VirtualBox.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 03:16 PM   #24
Erik_FL
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Your USB wireless adapter SHOULD NOT appear as a USB device in the virtual Linux Guest OS. In fact, you may find it less confusing if you disable the USB functions in the virtual machine's settings.

Install and configure your USB wireless adapter normally in Windows XP. You must set the Windows XP Wireless LAN connection to connect automatically to your wireless network SSID (name) with the correct encryption and pass phrase.

Add a virtual network adapter in the virtual machine settings. In the "Adapter Type" box choose the kind of virtual hardware (AMD or Intel) that you want the virtual Linux Guest OS to "see". In the "Attached to" box select "Bridged Adapter". In the "Name" box select the name of your Wireless LAN connection (as seen by Windows XP).

VirtualBox emulates a generic VESA display adapter. Until you install the VirtualBox Guest Additions either auto detect the adapter in Linux or stick to using a text mode command shell. Installing the Guest Additions will create or modify the "xorg.conf" file to use a better guest graphics driver.

Here is how to install Guest Additions.

Install your Linux OS first using text mode or a generic VESA adapter driver in "xorg.conf". On Windows XP, in the Devices menu of the virtual machine window, select "Install Guest Additions". That essentially maps the virtual CD drive to the ISO image of the Guest Additions CD. If your Linux detects that a CD is placed in the virtual drive it may ask if you want to run the file, or it may open a folder window.

Make sure that you are running as the "root" user in Linux when you install the Guest Additions. For example, from a command shell do this.

sudo su -

Enter your password.

Even if Linux does not automatically find and mount the CD you can do it manually.

mount /dev/hdc /mnt

Copy the file "VBoxLinuxAdditions-x86.run" to a directory in your Linux system.

mkdir /vmadditions
cd /vmadditions
cp /mnt/VBoxLinuxAdditions-x86.run .


Change the mode to allow execution and then run the installer.

chmod +x VBoxLinuxAdditions-x86.run
./VBoxLinuxAdditions-x86.run


After the installation is complete, reboot Linux in the normal manner.

shutdown -r now

In order to install the Guest Additions you must have the Linux header files for your system. You may have to install additional packages to get the Linux header files, and you may have to do a partial or full kernel build to generate the files. That depends on the distro. Slackware Linux and Ubuntu install all the necessary files with the default installation.

VirtualBox has some 3D graphics emulation features. I recommend that you disable those unless you absolutely need them. Besides making things slower they also may introduce problems. Some graphics effects such as transparency (opacity) are supported even without the 3D graphics emulation. For a basic GUI you don't need the 3D emulation.

The mouse, keyboard, disks, network and sound devices emulated by VirtualBox do not require any special drivers. They should be detected by Linux and work with the normal drivers included with Linux. Guest Additions installs some drivers that have additional features but you don't absolutely need them.

Make use of the clipboard. You can copy text to the clipboard in a virtual machine and access it in Windows. You can copy text to the clipboard in Windows and paste it into a virtual machine. If you install "gpm" in Linux you can access the clipboard from a console text screen even without X-Windows running in Linux.

Before you install Guest Additions you will have to click in the virtual machine window to change the keyboard and mouse focus to the virtual machine. Then the mouse pointer will be stuck inside the virtual machine window and won't move outside it. To un-capture the keyboard and mouse press the right hand Ctl key momentarily. After you install the Guest Additions the keyboard will follow the normal input focus in Windows and you can move the mouse cursor inside and outside the virtual machine window normally. For operating systems that don't work with Guest Additions (DOS, Windows 98) you can still use the limited mouse/keyboard capture approach with a generic VGA adapter in the guest OS.

I'm sorry I can't be more help with Linux. If you use Slackware I can give you very detailed instructions but I'm not as familiar with the details of other Linux distros.

Last edited by Erik_FL; 11-19-2009 at 03:19 PM.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 04:34 PM   #25
dvdljns
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Install and configure your USB wireless adapter normally in Windows XP. You must set the Windows XP Wireless LAN connection to connect automatically to your wireless network SSID (name) with the correct encryption and pass phrase
O k I am posting right now on this machine. eveything works. but I have no network connections in linux. For a point of referance I am using ubuntu 9.04. I tried fc3 but it did not set up right.

Quote:

Add a virtual network adapter in the virtual machine settings. In the "Adapter Type" box choose the kind of virtual hardware (AMD or Intel) that you want the virtual Linux Guest OS to "see". In the "Attached to" box select "Bridged Adapter". In the "Name" box select the name of your Wireless LAN connection (as seen by Windows XP).
my adapyor is a rtl8187L. should that be intel or amd. This is an intel cpu but what does that have to do with my network adaptor.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 04:46 PM   #26
dvdljns
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In the "Attached to" box select "Bridged Adapter". In the "Name" box select the name of your Wireless LAN connection (as seen by Windows XP).
This is not a choice offered me. I have not attached,nat,host adaptor or internal network.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 05:05 PM   #27
dvdljns
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Originally Posted by dvdljns View Post
This is not a choice offered me. I have not attached,nat,host adaptor or internal network.

I have attached a screen capture to show what I am seeing.
Attached Thumbnails
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ID:	2012  
 
Old 11-19-2009, 05:47 PM   #28
Erik_FL
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Quote:
My adapyor is a rtl8187L. should that be intel or amd. This is an intel cpu but what does that have to do with my network adaptor.
Either Intel or AMD will work. It has absolutely nothing to do with your actual hardware network adapter (rtl18187L). You are selecting the hardware to appear inside the virtual machine.

In the virtual machine (Linux OS) you need the correct Network driver.

Am79C973 (AMD PCnet-FAST III)

or

8254x (Intel PRO/1000)

Both of those are normal network cards/chips supported by the drivers included with Linux. Your Linux OS should detect them if they are included in your kernel or as a loadable module for your kernel. Ubuntu should detect them automatically.

No matter what you select in the "Attached to" and "Name" boxes, Linux should detect the adapter chosen in the "Adapter Type" box. You must also check-mark the "Enable Network Adapter" box.

Click the yellow gear next to "Attached to" and make sure that there is a valid "Guest MAC Address" along with a check-mark next to "Cable connected". If you don't see any Ethernet MAC address (might be your current problem) click the circular green arrows to generate a random MAC address. I think that I had this problem myself, and it wasn't obvious that I had to click the yellow gear icon. You can enter a specific MAC address if needed for a license key or some other reason. Just make sure that the MAC address is not used for anything else on your LAN.

Quote:
This is not a choice offered me. I have not attached,nat,host adaptor or internal network.
You will only see your Windows XP network adapters (connections) in the "Name" box if you select "Bridged Adapter". If you have selected "Bridged Adapter" and still don't see the Wireless connection then you probably need to install a Windows XP driver for the wireless adapter. If your wireless adapter appears in the Windows XP Connections folder then it should also appear in the "Name" drop down list when you select "Bridged Adapter" for the "Attached to" setting.

When you select "NAT" for "Attached to" you can't select one single network interface. The "Name" box is grayed. It will do NAT to all the available IP network interfaces on Windows XP. The IP routing table in Windows XP determines where anything from the virtual machine is sent.

The other "Attached to" settings allow you to type or select something inside "Name" that is not a Windows XP hardware Ethernet adapter. That will either be a Host Only (virtual) network connection in Windows XP or it will be the name of an "Internal Network" shared by the virtual machines.

Last edited by Erik_FL; 11-19-2009 at 05:55 PM.
 
Old 11-19-2009, 06:01 PM   #29
Erik_FL
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You are using a very old version of VirtualBox. I recommend that you download the current version from here.

http://www.virtualbox.org
 
Old 11-19-2009, 06:47 PM   #30
dvdljns
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erik_FL View Post
You are using a very old version of VirtualBox. I recommend that you download the current version from here.

http://www.virtualbox.org
Ok we need to back up here. You need to go back to the beginning and read from there. I feel like you have started posting without ever bothering to read the posts. This needs to be a two way convercation and it is obvious it is not.


Quote:
disconnected the drive that was in it and put in a 80 gig drive through on win2k,
Quote:

You are using a very old version of VirtualBox. I recommend that you download the current version from here.

1.5 Is the last version that works with win2k.

Quote:

Either Intel or AMD will work. It has absolutely nothing to do with your actual hardware network adapter (rtl18187L). You are selecting the hardware to appear inside the virtual machine.

In the virtual machine (Linux OS) you need the correct Network driver.
I am confused it does not matter or I need the right one. It can not be both.

Quote:

You will only see your Windows XP network adapters (connections) in the "Name" box if you select "Bridged Adapter
This is what I am talking about. There needs to be two way info here. There is no option for a bridged adaptor. I repeat that is not a option given me.

Last edited by dvdljns; 11-19-2009 at 06:49 PM.
 
  


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