LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-03-2007, 11:36 AM   #1
john83reuben
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia
Distribution: Debian Etch, OpenSuse
Posts: 132

Rep: Reputation: 17
Confusion with Linux


> 1- Can I really make a decent living from a free OS? > 2- Who is using, hence, hiring people with Linux skills? > 3- Do I have to grow a beard and learn to hack -- What do I really need to know? > 4- I've heard about some sort of Redhat certification -- is this a good idea, and what other certification programs are out there? > 5- Which distribution should I specialize in? > 6- Ok, I've spent 8 months learning this stuff, taken the tests, & researched the job market; now what?

I'm going to install and try to work my way through it, but I'm not sure if that's the best way to go. None of my buddies have any Linux experience, so I've only got the 'net as my tutor. Should I consider taking a class to learn it?

Basically, I'm just looking for advice. Anything would be helpful.

Thanks,

John
 
Old 11-03-2007, 11:47 AM   #2
dxqcanada
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 702

Rep: Reputation: 43
Yes. The Linux OS is "free" ... but most enterprise distributions such as SuSE or RedHat are not free (as they also include support).

Company's that use Linux.

Depends on what the job is ... System Administration tends to be the most common job.

A RedHat Certification will give provide a skill set dedicated to that particular distribution. It goes over many items that a RedHat system admin would need to know.

Check job ad's ... they usually will specify what they use.

Get a job.


Learning on your own has some deficiencies ... as you will not encounter the normal Enterprise duties just by playing with it.
A good thing to start is buy the RedHat Cert book(s) then install Centos (it is based on the RedHat Enterprise versions) to use to follow the stuff in the book.
 
Old 11-03-2007, 12:15 PM   #3
MoonMind
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Switzerland
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 448

Rep: Reputation: 38
Looks like quite a project there Honestly, most of those questions can't be answered in any definite way - but if hints are wanted, I can contribute some:

@1) Yes, you can. A lot of servers run GNU/Linux, and there's always a demand for skilled people. And there's a growing market for GNU/Linux on the desktop as well. Look at http://lxer.com for a couple of days (or maybe weeks) to get an impression (and a lot of useful links and hints on resources).
@2) See 1; additionally, think of businesses moving their servers to Linux. Think of education (the people there are increasingly aware of the fact that GNU/Linux cannot only save their day after another M$ blunder, but also loads of money). And from what I see around me (people switching to GNU/Linux simply because they like it - normal users, not necessarily geeks), this is just the beginning. As a matter of fact, everything that can be done with computers can be done with GNU/Linux. And more and more, it actually *is* done with GNU/Linux!
@3) The more you know, the better. If you consider making a professional career, some coding skills are more or less mandatory (if you're not trying the "consulting" way of things [going all "meta" without having a real idea of the things you're talking about] - I don't recommend that, though; it's not a healthy way in the GNU/Linux world). And obviously, M$-only skills are not nil, but not really helpful. But what you really need depends on what you want to be able to do. Shell scripting, scripting, coding, even markup - the more you know the better. You can start with a very basic knowledge level, though, but again, if your want to earn money, you'll have to be able to handle things properly and work your way through problems by yourself. Hands-on is inavoidable. Beards, OTOH, are optional.
@4) Look at: http://www.lpi.org/ - and search the web for Linux certification, you'll get any information you'll ever want and need.
@5) No need to specialise; in fact, the more you know about different approaches, the better you'll be able to judge the suitability of a certain distribution for a special task at hand. I myself are totally biased towards Debian and its decendants, but others may feel otherwise - which is absolutely fine by me. As learning tools, I'd recommend Debian (or Ubuntu if you want something that's made a major impact in a very short time), Slackware (or maybe Zenwalk for an easier start while not losing most of the advantages of Slack) and Gentoo (even though my personal experience with the latter is a bit sobering, but I admit that I've learned a lot from trying to use it - especially about my personal limitations ). If you don't like the hands-on approach (which I'd judge rather disappointing, really - do you want to get into it or not?!), there are a lot of others that offer more "ease of use", but if you want to learn, I'd say: Do that, then.
@6) *IF* you've done what you described, I'd say you'll know: If you do eight full months of dedicated learning and research, you'll be sure of what to do next. If not - well, you'll still be a lot better placed for IT work of any kind! In fact, learning GNU/Linux is just about the best way to learn about computing and every related subject (IMHO).

That said, the first thing would be to get a distro working on a box and look thoroughly at how things are done in GNU/Linux. Again, Debian'll do just fine (and so will all the other so-called "tough" ones). I wouldn't say a course is necessary (or even helpful); doing things is a lot better. If you get stuck, seek help on the net.

M.
 
Old 11-03-2007, 12:39 PM   #4
john83reuben
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Location: Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia
Distribution: Debian Etch, OpenSuse
Posts: 132

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dxqcanada View Post

A good thing to start is buy the RedHat Cert book(s) then install Centos (it is based on the RedHat Enterprise versions) to use to follow the stuff in the book.
Why do you emphasize on reading Cert books. Are they any difference, compared to normal Linux HowTo books. Thanks
 
Old 11-04-2007, 02:35 AM   #5
MoonMind
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Switzerland
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 448

Rep: Reputation: 38
john83reuben: It's because you asked Of course, "normal" how-tos make for a good read, but if you go for certification, the others are more recommendable. You can find a lot of useful books at http://www.oreilly.com/pub/topic/linux (there you'll find stuff for every level of knowledge); for specific books on certain distributions, their websites give you the information you need about books - some you can even download. And of course, there's always the net...

M.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 05:47 AM   #6
salasi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Directly above centre of the earth, UK
Distribution: SuSE, plus some hopping
Posts: 4,060

Rep: Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883Reputation: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by john83reuben View Post
Why do you emphasize on reading Cert books. Are they any difference, compared to normal Linux HowTo books. Thanks
You asked about certification. If you decide on certification, there is an exam. If you want to pass the exam, you want to prepare for the exam. In preparing for the exam, a book that has as one of its primary goals getting you through the exam would be good.

That is not to say that there aren't other books that would be good, but
- there are some bad books out there...well, bad for the current purpose, anyway
- there are some books that will tell you stuff about other distros that may contradict with the one that you have chosen to be examined upon... that won't help you pass that particular exam, altough they may be fine books, in general
- a 'cert book' will concentrate not just on one particular distro, but one particular exam...its an advantage if that's the exam that you are intending taking (you wouldn't necessarily want to spend all your time studying networking if it was a database admin exam that you were taking)

There are other certs apart from the RedHat one. SuSE has a similar kind of program, but look at job adverts in your target geographical area as, while Redhat is well ahead in the enterprise arena in the US, SuSE is probably just ahead in Europe. So you need to consider what is in demand where you intend to work. What employment ads in that particular geographical area ask for is a good indication.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My confusion with Linux Marlinnhag@aol.com Linux - Newbie 6 09-27-2006 04:23 PM
Linux Mail: Confusion and Ignorance james1980 Linux - Software 3 04-02-2004 03:25 AM
Linux Wireless Networking Confusion redneon Linux - Wireless Networking 3 01-18-2004 02:39 PM
Confusion with Nvidia drivers for Linux..... lub0 Linux - Software 2 09-23-2003 11:46 AM
Upgrade of Linux 6.2 to 7.1 -- confusion russell Linux - Software 7 08-08-2001 07:48 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:52 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration