LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-07-2015, 02:29 PM   #1
green ice
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2015
Posts: 152

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Confusion about when Linux Mint is really Installed


I installed Linux Mint 10 from a DVD, or so I thought. My other OS is Win 7 which I want to shift away from.

But on the Desktop of Linux Mint was the the file labelled Install Linux Mint.

It gave three choices:
- install alongside another operating system
- erase and use entire disk
- specify partitions manually

Does this mean that Linux Mint from the DVD is not really the full system?

Would it be better to use one of the options, like the first, so I could have both Win 7 and Linux Mint?

(I could also use a linux mint tutorial btw)
 
Old 08-07-2015, 03:25 PM   #2
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 14,930

Rep: Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520
The disc boots what is known as a Live DVD. LiveCD The Operating system runs entirely from memory and the disc and is almost like the real thing. To actually install Mint to the hard drive you would as discovered click on the installer application.

The documentation will guide you through the installation process. The install along side will configure a dual boot system and without knowing what applications you run or how you use your computer we can't say yet if it is better than only running linux.

The other two options are for installing as the only operating system and installing to existing partitions.

http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php
 
Old 08-07-2015, 05:35 PM   #3
green ice
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2015
Posts: 152

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk View Post
The disc boots what is known as a Live DVD. LiveCD The Operating system runs entirely from memory and the disc and is almost like the real thing. To actually install Mint to the hard drive you would as discovered click on the installer application.

The documentation will guide you through the installation process. The install along side will configure a dual boot system and without knowing what applications you run or how you use your computer we can't say yet if it is better than only running linux.

The other two options are for installing as the only operating system and installing to existing partitions.

http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php
Thanks for responding on this.

I read that if you pick "install alongside" then you are given the chance to create a partition at that time.

Is this correct or should I partition before installing?

I have 6 gig RAM and 500 gig HDD.
 
Old 08-07-2015, 05:58 PM   #4
Saorge
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
Linux Mint installation program will create a new partition for Linux Mint if there is unused (unallocated) space on your HDD. In any case, you will have the choice to set new partition(s) yourself because the installation program will ask a confirmation of changes that will be done. If you have Windows 7 and do not have free space, you will have to shrink your Win 7 data partition before (usually labelled OS by Linux and most of the time the sda5 partition). To do so, use the disk manager in Win7 (or gparted in Linux), select the partition and select resize option. But if it is your first time, be extremely careful! Be sure to resize the data partition and not any other. Usually, it is the biggest (in your case, more than 300 GB).
 
Old 08-07-2015, 05:58 PM   #5
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 6,869

Rep: Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247
Are you actually trying to install Linux Mint 10? As you can see at the link below to the Mint site, the support for this version ended over three years ago. It is outdated and you will not be able to get updates or install software in the normal manner. If your computer is newer, you might try downloading and running the current version of Mint, 17.

http://www.linuxmint.com/oldreleases.php

I've never actually used the Install Alongside method. It usually works if you have unallocated space available on the drive but because you don't really have much control, you may not know if there are any problems until you reboot. The manual option which is referred to as "Something Else" on newer versions of Mint will give you more control over the installation.

The Mint DVD, as pointed out above, contains the operating system as read only. The disadvantage of that is any changes to software or files created are lost on reboot when running from a DVD. Of course it also contains the installer to put Mint on a hard drive.
 
Old 08-08-2015, 11:44 AM   #6
green ice
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2015
Posts: 152

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saorge View Post
Linux Mint installation program will create a new partition for Linux Mint if there is unused (unallocated) space on your HDD. In any case, you will have the choice to set new partition(s) yourself because the installation program will ask a confirmation of changes that will be done.

If you have Windows 7 and do not have free space, you will have to shrink your Win 7 data partition before (usually labelled OS by Linux and most of the time the sda5 partition). To do so, use the disk manager in Win7 (or gparted in Linux), select the partition and select resize option. But if it is your first time, be extremely careful! Be sure to resize the data partition and not any other. Usually, it is the biggest (in your case, more than 300 GB).
I have now only 1 partition, the entire disk space. 500 gbn minus something taken out I guess by Windows install.

I am not exactly sure what you mean by "data partition". Does MS reserve some space from the total 500 gb?

There is at least 400 gb remaining on my HDD.

So am assuming I can just let Linux do it.

My sony vaio was bought in 2011. I am now trying to download Linux Mint 17 cinnamon but since the iso is 1.5 gb it is not proving to be easy. If I can get it I will do the install with that.

Last edited by green ice; 08-08-2015 at 11:51 AM.
 
Old 08-08-2015, 02:08 PM   #7
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 6,869

Rep: Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247Reputation: 1247
Quote:
I have now only 1 partition, the entire disk space. 500 gbn minus something taken out I guess by Windows install
If you have only one partition and it takes up the entire disk, you won't be able to install Mint. When you get the new Mint downloaded and put on a DVD or flash drive, boot it up. When you get to the Desktop with the Install Linux Mint icon, go to the Menu and find the terminal and when you opne it run this command: sudo fdisk -l(Lower Case Letter L in the command). That will provide some detaile on your drives/partitions so someone should be able to give you specific advice on what to do.

If you currently have unallocated space on the drive, the Mint installer should work with either method, Alongside or Something Else. If you have free space inside a windows partition, that won't help. Shrink the windows partition and then reboot it and run chkdsk before beginning the install of Mint.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-09-2015, 12:51 PM   #8
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,258

Rep: Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947
Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
If you have only one partition and it takes up the entire disk, you won't be able to install Mint.
Many Linux installers will happily resize your windows partition for you during the install process if you choose. I would actually be surprised if Mint won't do that.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 01:39 PM   #9
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 14,930

Rep: Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520Reputation: 1520
Yes, the install alongside will shrink an existing windows partition as well as the something else option will allow one to manually create partitions as desired.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hi, I have Linux mint 16 installed on 1 partition, I want to install W. 8.1 as well stewart858 Linux - Newbie 2 05-30-2014 01:44 AM
Installed Linux Mint 14 but HDD will not boot rayp Linux - Newbie 18 01-29-2014 08:50 AM
I installed the vanilla kernel on Linux Mint and.... darkstarbyte Linux - Kernel 1 12-24-2010 04:55 AM
How do I boot Linux Mint~!? ( installed from Live CD ) bruceleejr Linux Mint 16 02-19-2010 05:09 PM
I am a new member .I have Linux mint installed alex6500 LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 1 08-18-2009 08:12 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:14 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration