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-   -   configuring laptop C drive into half windows 7 and half linux (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/configuring-laptop-c-drive-into-half-windows-7-and-half-linux-933241/)

muddyholiday 03-07-2012 10:24 AM

configuring laptop C drive into half windows 7 and half linux
 
is it possible to partition my windows seven so that i can use microsoft while learning how to use linux? as well as which linux is best for beginners? Should i start with the build your own style?

DavidMcCann 03-07-2012 10:35 AM

Yes! That's what most people do who have a computer with Windows pre-installed. You defrag the HD and then run the Linux installation disk. That allows you to shrink your Windows partition and create new ones alongside it to hold Linux. The distributions all come with installation instructions on their websites that explain how to do it.

Everyone has their own ideas on the best distros. Unlike Windows, Linux allow you to choose a user interface or desktop, so it's a good idea to try them out and see which you like. The Cd or DVD allows you to try without installing. I'd suggest Linux Mint. Get two CDs: the KDE and Xfce ones have a very different style so you can see how personal Linux can be. The main Mint disk, using Gnome, in in a bit of a state of flux at the moment, so I'd give it a miss for now.

TobiSGD 03-07-2012 11:20 AM

You don't need to repartition at all to learn Linux. Just install Linux into a virtual machine, like Virtualbox. This way you can even run both systems at the same time.

DavidMcCann 03-08-2012 11:14 AM

Using Virtualbox depends on having enough memory for both operating systems plus VB's own requirement. Some Linux distros may give problems or require tweaking, as mentioned in the VB manual. That's why I didn't suggest it: keep things simple!

suicidaleggroll 03-08-2012 11:29 AM

How is re-partitioning the hard drive and overwriting the boot sector (requiring him to go back and re-write it every time he tries out a new Linux distro, or if he decides to drop it and go back to Windows) "keeping things simple"? If he doesn't know what he's doing, he could easily wipe out his entire Windows installation.

A full re-partition and installation is about as far from "simple" as you can get.

Try out the VM, it is the perfect fit for what you are looking for. If you have problems, then you should look into setting up a live USB stick. Only if you have problems with both of those (rare), should you consider a full installation for your application.

Master_CAPS 03-08-2012 02:41 PM

Get partition magic. shrink your C:\ (8-40gb) and boot up a live cd and click install.
If you ever want to go back just boot into windows, open partition magic, and click "fix MBR" than just delete the linux partition. (this puts it all back to normal.

If something ever goes wrong get HBCD (herenis boot cd) and save it to a cd.
You can boot even if MBR is f---ed, and run windows apps from it.

as for distro, get LINUX MINT 12(gnome3) its like windows 7

EevaH 03-16-2012 04:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DavidMcCann (Post 4620956)
Yes! That's what most people do who have a computer with Windows pre-installed. You defrag the HD and then run the Linux installation disk. That allows you to shrink your Windows partition and create new ones alongside it to hold Linux. The distributions all come with installation instructions on their websites that explain how to do it.

This is what I have always done, too, though am still with XP. However, trying to defrag with Mydefrag and option to gather everything together, it still leaves a couple of small winfiles near the end of the disk (cannot be moved), leaving me only 10/180 gigs available for another opsys. I got this advice in Mydefrag forum:

For resizing partitions the free Gnome Partition Editor is very good. You don't need MyDefrag to move the data first, Gnome will do it all for you.

True or False?

If true, is this the same software I just used installing Ubuntu 11.10 on my laptop besides XP? If not, where can I find it? Can it really truly move the offending NTFS data out of its way, not just wipe it off? As usual, I got no install media with the preinstalled XP so I'd hate to kill it. I plan to use it from live-CD, so XP should not be guarding its files.


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