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Old 01-12-2009, 08:56 AM   #1
Ascendancy5
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Comparison to "Program Files" Folder in Linux?


Is there a folder in Linux that can be compared to the Program Files folder in Windows, or more specifically just a folder where all of your installed programs go?
 
Old 01-12-2009, 09:09 AM   #2
pixellany
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Program files con go anywhere, but there are some conventions.

/bin: basic utilities
/sbin: utilities normally only used by the systems admin
/usr/...: Application programs
/opt/...: Application programs not installed with the distro package manager

The above are my very loose definitions---the standard reference is the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard---I think it's at http://tldp.org, but Google will find it.
 
Old 01-12-2009, 09:18 AM   #3
alan_ri
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No,It's different in Linux.Learn about it here.
 
Old 01-13-2009, 07:53 AM   #4
Ascendancy5
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Thanks for the link. Still seems a bit confusing, but I'm going to go through the documentation to check it out.
 
Old 01-13-2009, 08:22 AM   #5
pixellany
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It's not confusing---it's tradition......

Linux builds on the Unix tradition, which has it's roots in large, multi-user systems. You are not required to use ANY of the conventions, but your life will often be easier if you do.
 
Old 01-14-2009, 07:43 AM   #6
Ascendancy5
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Well then I guess it's not confusing, just something new to me so it's hard to grasp right away. I figured Linux was based off a lot of Unix's design, which I also don't know very well, so this is like something completely new for me.
 
Old 01-14-2009, 07:54 AM   #7
brianL
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Don't worry about it. The package management of whatever distro you use knows where to put everything.
 
Old 01-14-2009, 09:14 AM   #8
sundialsvcs
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As they said, "it's tradition." But a very good one. Remember, Linux goes back to Unix which goes back to the 1970's ... and lots and lots of way-cool systems from way back then.

Windows' Program Files folder is actually a fairly-recent invention, and it, too, is "a convention." Windows has a certain "path" of places where it looks for things like applications and libraries. Every system does. And Windows has its backward compatibility considerations, and its "traditions," too.

So... Linux comes from the Unix camp, while Windows comes from MS-DOS which came from CP/M and DEC VAX and RSTS/E and lots of other (ahem... you may call them...) "oldies." If you know what rocks to look under, it's all "still there," in every case. And there will be a fairly large number of applications which still depend on them.
 
Old 01-14-2009, 09:22 AM   #9
pwc101
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You may be interested in Gobolinux, which has taken the traditional filesystem hierarchy, and replaced it with:

/Programs
/System
/Users
/Files
/Mount
/Depot

See http://www.gobolinux.org and particularly http://gobo.kundor.org/wiki/The_Gobo...stem_Hierarchy for more info.

How they manage to maintain traditional FHS and their system in parallel is mind boggling.
 
Old 01-15-2009, 07:40 AM   #10
Ascendancy5
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Thanks pwc101, but it's not that I'm interested in turning Linux into the same file structure as Windows, I am just interested in learning how Linux is different than Windows and how to transition a bit easier
 
Old 01-15-2009, 07:43 AM   #11
pwc101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ascendancy5 View Post
Thanks pwc101, but it's not that I'm interested in turning Linux into the same file structure as Windows, I am just interested in learning how Linux is different than Windows and how to transition a bit easier
I thought that was the case, but the articles on how Gobolinux has arranged its filesystem explain what each directory in the traditional UNIX filesystem corresponds to in a Windows-type filesystem.

Particularly this part:
Code:
:-- etc  -> System/Settings
:-- dev  -> System/Kernel/Devices
:-- sys  -> System/Kernel/Objects
:-- proc -> System/Kernel/Status
:-- var  -> System/Variable
:-- tmp  -> System/Variable/tmp
:-- sbin -> System/Links/Executables
:-- bin  -> System/Links/Executables
:-- lib  -> System/Links/Libraries
`-- usr
    |-- X11R6   -> .
    |-- local   -> .
    |-- sbin    -> ../System/Links/Executables
    |-- bin     -> ../System/Links/Executables
    |-- include -> ../System/Links/Headers
    |-- lib     -> ../System/Links/Libraries
    |-- man     -> ../System/Links/Manuals
    `-- share   -> ../System/Links/Shared
 
Old 01-15-2009, 07:45 AM   #12
craigevil
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The important thing to do is to READ the documentation that is available for the distribution that your running. You should also add the distro your using to your profile ,makes it easier for people to help you.

Between your distro's docs, Google and resources like:
The Linux Documentation Project
http://tldp.org/
LINUX: Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition
http://linux.2038bug.com/rute-home.html

You will be good to go.
 
  


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