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Old 08-10-2005, 08:34 PM   #1
Saquear
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Command Line


Hi everyone, I done the search thing and the wheel just kept going around so I thought I'd just ask, when using the command line what determines the spaces? Do you start to type after the blinking cursor or do you space and then start to type? What is the rule of thumb in either case? Thank you Saquear!!!
 
Old 08-10-2005, 08:43 PM   #2
kencaz
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I'm confused by your problem... a space is just that... you type command on the CLI as you would normally... a space being a space...

KC
 
Old 08-10-2005, 11:31 PM   #3
Saquear
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Command Line!!!

"Space is just a space ", sounds like my teacher!!! Again, do you start typing right after the blinking cursor or is there a space between the cursor and where you start to type??? Saquear!!!
 
Old 08-10-2005, 11:40 PM   #4
detpenguin
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type right after the blinking cursor....although either would work, but the a space is not required...
 
Old 08-10-2005, 11:54 PM   #5
jrdioko
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Two things I can think of could be confusing you. First, in many programs there is a single line for a cursor while the command line often has a solid block. Think of the left side of the block as the single-lined cursor and you'll be fine. Second, there is a space between your prompt on the command line and where you start typing, but that's technically part of the prompt and not something you type. Try hitting backspace and you'll see it won't delete. If you're in doubt, hit backspace to get rid of any spaces you've put in there, then start to type.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 12:27 AM   #6
Saquear
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Command Line!!!

Thanks guys, " one down" next, where do you use a space in the command line, otherwise what calls for leaving a space symbols or cyphers or letters? What is the rule for for when you apply spaces??? Saquear!!!
 
Old 08-11-2005, 09:30 PM   #7
jrdioko
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Take a look at:

http://www.linuxcommand.org

to learn how to use the command line. Spaces go in between arguments, and it should be common sense once you learn the commands. For example, it seems obvious (to me at least) that you type "cd /etc" instead of "cd/etc" to change directories to /etc.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:28 PM   #8
Saquear
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Command Line!!!

Common sense is only an agreement between users, and since I'm new I am not sure what the agreement is, that is why I am asking!!! Thank you anyway!!! I have been going to Linux Command dot org and it is a very good tutorial especially the way he approaches but he omitts spacing... I also sent him an email about this topic but no response yet... I just thought that since this whole site is based around products that are command line oriented I thought it would be easier to get some assistance here!!! Saquear.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:36 PM   #9
jrdioko
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I apologize if my post came across as putting you down, that certainly wasn't my intention. From my experience it seems clear but maybe it isn't as obvious as I thought. I'll try to explain how spaces work here, and post back with specific questions if that doesn't help. I'm still a little confused exactly what you're asking.

When typing something on the command line, you start typing immediately without putting any spaces before what you're typing. The first things to put is the command you want to run (for example, "cd" or "mv"). Next comes a space. After that usually comes some options passed to the command (such as "-nolisten" "--version" or "-la"). Then another space. Then whatever else the command requires, such as the path to a file or two (again separated by spaces).

For example,

Code:
ls
ls -la
ls -la /etc
tar zxvf archive.tar.gz
make install
mv /home/you/file /home/you/renamedfile
cp file1 directory1
ps -e
Let me know if anything's still confusing. The exact syntax really depends on what command you're using.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:57 PM   #10
ComputerErik
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If you have ever used DOS, or the CLI of enterprise routers and switches, then the way spaces are used is pretty much the same.

I have to agree that it is pretty much a common sense sort of thing. Try thinking of it like typing a letter or other document. A space is used to seperate words. Using the commend interface is very much the same, a space seperates a command and any paramaters it takes.

BTW, I am a newbie at this too. I am fairly comfortable working in a CLI environment, but not very familiar with the specifics of Linux.
 
Old 08-12-2005, 12:23 AM   #11
Saquear
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Command Line!!!

OooooKay!!! Thanks a lot, you guys don't understand but that did clear a lot of confusion... And jrdioko I am going to take you up on that offer cause I'm almost positive that I'm going to have more questions... Again all of you Thank you very much, Saquear!!!
 
  


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