LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-10-2010, 01:48 AM   #1
Oldgeek54
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2010
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Unhappy Choosing Partition for Ubuntu/XP Install


Hi, all. Like most long-time Windows users, I am a bit (very!) confused by the manual partitioning of Linux, and particularly the semi-guided partitioning of Ubuntu 10. I first tried Ubuntu way back in version 5, and it was easy to install, I could identify the correct partition by SIZE, not the enigmatic sdb1(0,1,0) nomenclature used in 10.

I set up a 32GB partition, figuring I could install Ubuntu to that, letting it manage the entire space. Instead, I can't even figure out which drive or partition is which (three hard drives, 8 partitions).

Why can't Linux (most distros--some are clear) at least give you a "sdb (0,1,0) 25.6GB" "hint" that you are installing to where you want to?

I've tried thirty versions/distros of Linux over the years (starting with Corel Linux) and for the same handful of reasons, never replaced Windows, or for that matter, even used Linux much.

1) Partitioning woes (explained above)
2) Inability to play well with Windows networks
3) ALSA? I've NEVER gotten it to work for me; it either works out of the box or I never have sound
4) Needing to download every audio and video codec and it's associated libraries to play an mp3 and watch a Divx movie
5) Completely non-intuitive naming of almost every part of Linux (why can't the names at least hint at what they are?)

Yes, I want a more Windows-like Linux. I grew up with the DOS command prompt. Been there, done that. Ain't going back.
 
Old 12-10-2010, 01:58 AM   #2
stress_junkie
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.04 and CentOS 5.5
Posts: 3,873

Rep: Reputation: 332Reputation: 332Reputation: 332Reputation: 332
I agree with every one of your complaints.

It seems that recent versions of Linux distributions have taken a bad direction in several areas. The installer is one of those areas.

You may have better luck with Linux Mint 10.
http://http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

You may help yourself if you create both a Linux system partition AND a swap partition using Windows. The swap partition could be 2 GB in size.

during the installation you choose "custom disk partition" or "manual disk partition" The Linux Mint installer makes the partitions easier to visualize. You must tell the installer to put the Linux system partition mount point at / which is the up slash. Tell the installer that the swap partition is "type swap".

I recently (last week) installed Linux Mint 10 but the details are starting to fade from my memory. I just remember that disk partitioning was easy to visualize. But I only have one physical disk in my machine.

Last edited by stress_junkie; 12-10-2010 at 02:03 AM.
 
Old 12-10-2010, 06:28 AM   #3
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,130
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825
Easiest way would be to not make partitions for Ubuntu, but delete them. Then at install time let Ubuntu simply use the free space.

To your complaints:
1. Should be solved if you don't create partitions, but let the installer do it automatically in the free space.
2. I have never had any problems with that, what are your issues?
3. Same as with 2, what are your issues?
4. Try Linux Mint, it comes with all that preinstalled.
5. It is only unintuitive because it is not named like in Windows. Windows namings are also not intuitive, only thing is that you are used to their namings, it has nothing to do with unintuitive.

I think the problem that most people have, when they want to change to Linux, is that they expect Linux to be like a free Windows replacement. But it is not, Linux was invented as a free Unix replacement. Maybe you should have a look here.
 
Old 12-10-2010, 06:38 AM   #4
i92guboj
Gentoo support team
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: Lucena, Córdoba (Spain)
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 4,063

Rep: Reputation: 381Reputation: 381Reputation: 381Reputation: 381
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldgeek54 View Post
Hi, all. Like most long-time Windows users, I am a bit (very!) confused by the manual partitioning of Linux, and particularly the semi-guided partitioning of Ubuntu 10. I first tried Ubuntu way back in version 5, and it was easy to install, I could identify the correct partition by SIZE, not the enigmatic sdb1(0,1,0) nomenclature used in 10.

I set up a 32GB partition, figuring I could install Ubuntu to that, letting it manage the entire space. Instead, I can't even figure out which drive or partition is which (three hard drives, 8 partitions).

Why can't Linux (most distros--some are clear) at least give you a "sdb (0,1,0) 25.6GB" "hint" that you are installing to where you want to?
I can't comment on installers, I don't use them on my home PC's (Gentoo), and when doing so in other computers I usually just empty the drive(s) and start afresh, so partitioning is hardly an issue there. However I am surprised that it is that hard to guess it. Installers should offer a clear view of your drives. Bad for them if they don't. You can always choose another distribution. The installers are not part of Linux itself and each distro do have its own, so if you don't like *buntu's one pick SuSE or anything else.

Quote:
1) Partitioning woes (explained above)
You should also be able to use control+alt+f1, to go to a terminal, and then use fdisk -l to try to guess yourself. I agree that's far from intuitive, though.

Quote:
2) Inability to play well with Windows networks
Windows networks are a pain by design, nothing to do with Linux. Linux can do ok with CIFS and Samba based networks. But these networks usually fail, it doesn't matter you are on a Windows or Linux machine. If you have a more concrete problem just ask for a solution. The fact that something doesn't fit your desires with a default setup doesn't mean it's broken or bad.

Quote:
3) ALSA? I've NEVER gotten it to work for me; it either works out of the box or I never have sound
ALSA is probably the most buggy piece in Linux. Pile that up with pulse, jack and a few others... But, in any case, the problem(s) you have might have an easy solution. Again, open a thread when you have a problem and look for a solution.

Quote:
4) Needing to download every audio and video codec and it's associated libraries to play an mp3 and watch a Divx movie
Oh, right, in Windows you don't need to download codecs (nor drivers, nor anything else, right?). Maybe something happened while I was asleep.

5) Completely non-intuitive naming of almost every part of Linux (why can't the names at least hint at what they are?)

Quote:
Yes, I want a more Windows-like Linux.
It's called "Windows". If you want Windows use Windows. It's a nonsense to do otherwise.

All in all, it seems you are in anger because "Linux is not Windows (TM)".
 
Old 12-10-2010, 08:32 AM   #5
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: Slackware®
Posts: 12,549
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,

@OP Not to be smart but;
'(Linux is Not Windows) Refers to the GNU/Linux OS and various Free & Open-Source Software (FOSS) projects under the catch-all name of "Linux". It scans better and a Great Article'

You may have started at DOS, but MS-DOS started indirectly from UNIX style via CP/M.

Modern Gnu/Linux shouldn't even be compared to MS-DOS since DOS is so archaic. Gnu/Linux cli surpasses DOS commands even back in 1993. Gnu/Linux OS and MS-DOS OS are different animals. Darn, that Apple thing keeps slipping in.

As to the semantics & syntax issues you seem to be having with Gnu/Linux here's
a few links to aid you to gaining some understanding;



1 Linux Documentation Project
2 Rute Tutorial & Exposition
3 Linux Command Guide
4 Bash Beginners Guide
5 Bash Reference Manual
6 Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
7 Linux Newbie Admin Guide
8 LinuxSelfHelp
9 Getting Started with Linux


The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just Slackware® links!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OVER MY HEAD - Choosing the right partition to boot from, Grub? zzyzx1 Linux - Newbie 12 11-08-2009 02:20 PM
Ubuntu 9.x install corrupted NTFS partition; repair corrupted TrueCrypt partition halfer Linux - General 1 06-30-2009 03:59 PM
Ubuntu Install Partition Error rlorenz7 Linux - Newbie 6 02-02-2008 02:14 PM
I Cant Install Ubuntu...I cant go through the Partition section....! perfectbiker Linux - Software 4 05-17-2006 03:56 PM
How do I partition my HDD and install Ubuntu? tmtjjhnsn Linux - Newbie 2 10-03-2005 07:43 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:09 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration