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Old 04-06-2010, 09:00 PM   #1
koodoo
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Registered: Aug 2004
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Distribution: Fedora Core 1, Slackware 10.0 | 2.4.26 | custom 2.6.14.2, Slackware 10.2 | 11.0, Slackware64-13
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Cannot change file permissions on a mounted file system


Hi,

I have an ntfs partition that I wish to access as a normal user(non-root). For this I did the following.

As root I created a folder /windows and did a chmod 777 -R on /windows.
Then I added the following line to /etc/fstab
Code:
/dev/sda3        /windows       ntfs-3g     defaults,nosuid,nodev,umask=000        1   0
Now, the partition is mounted alright but the problem is that when any other user (non-root) creates a files in /windows (say by executing touch newfile) the newly created file has the owner and group set as root.

The non-root user can create the file and he can also delete the file, however, he cannot change the permissions of the file and also the owner:group is always set as root:root.

How do I get across this problem, i.e. how do I mount a partition, so that a non-root user can also change the permissions and ownerships of the files he creates.

Thanks a lot,
koodoo

Last edited by koodoo; 04-06-2010 at 09:01 PM.
 
Old 04-06-2010, 09:24 PM   #2
Tinkster
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You can't have permissions on ntfs, as the file-system has no idea what
Linux permissions are; same applies for ownerships.

You can choose ONE user to "own" all files at mount-time, but that's
about as flexible as windows file-systems are in regards to Linux'
ownerships and perms.


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 04-06-2010, 11:22 PM   #3
koodoo
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Registered: Aug 2004
Location: a small village faraway in the mountains
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Hi Tinkster,

Thanks a lot. Now it makes sense. When I am mount the partition in Ubuntu then it works fine (because the partition is mounted by the currently logged in user), however it does not in Slackware (where the root mounts the partitions at startup).
And I was wondering why it is working in Ubuntu and not in Slack when the contents of /etc/mtab of both were exactly the same.

Thanks again,
koodoo.
 
  


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